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house Bill H.R. 1156

Do U.S. Researchers Need to Coordinate With the International Science and Technology Community?

Argument in favor

Scientific collaboration benefits all parties involved, and having U.S. researchers work with international partners could accelerate the pace of scientific and technological development.

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05/27/2015
It has been proven that collaboration leads to progress. Thus, even collaboration between the public and private sections of R&D could only further benefit humanity as a whole.
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mickeywc24's Opinion
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05/27/2015
I would encourage those commenting negatively on this to actually read the bill. It plainly states that partnerships must be in line with our foreign policy objectives.
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James's Opinion
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05/29/2015
Science benefits the entirety of mankind. It's more effective and cheaper to work together.
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Argument opposed

This could potentially put U.S. researchers in the unsavory position of having to collaborate with repressive regimes — there need to be guidelines outlining who American researchers should collaborate with.

ThomasParker's Opinion
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05/26/2015
It is not the role of the government to attempt to stimulate research. While well-intentioned, these research councils and bodies never amount to more than useless bureaucracies that end up inhibiting the very innovation they were established to create.
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PacificCstar's Opinion
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06/04/2015
We do not need to collaborate. We need to compete. That's what drove us to reach the moon.
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Jake's Opinion
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02/02/2016
It is the researchers' decision to collaborate or not. I wouldn't want to be forced to write a dissertation with someone just because the government thinks it would be nice. This hinders our advancement.
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What is House Bill H.R. 1156?

This bill would establish a body within the National Science and Technology Council (NSTC) to identify and coordinate international science and technology cooperation. Bill sponsors hope that international cooperation will strengthen domestic science and technology sectors, improve economic and national security, and support U.S. foreign policy goals.

The NSTC body would be co-chaired by senior level officials from the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) and the Department of State. Its responsibilities would include:

  • Planning and coordinating international research and training activities with other NSTC committees.

  • Establishing Federal priorities and policies for aligning international science and technology cooperative research, activities, and partnerships with U.S. foreign policy goals.

  • Identify opportunities for cooperative research and training partnerships that advance both the science and technology and foreign policy objectives of the U.S.

  • Soliciting input from non-Federal stakeholders like universities, scientific and professional societies, private industry, and relevant organizations and institutions.Identify broad issues that influence the ability of U.S. scientists and engineers to collaborate with their foreign counterparts - including barriers to collaboration and access to scientific information.

Impact

Stakeholders that have an interest in international science and research cooperation (like universities, professional societies, businesses, etc.), the newly established body under the NSTC, the NSTC, officials from the OSTP and the State Department, the Director of OSTP.

Cost of House Bill H.R. 1156

$3.00 Million
The CBO estimates that implementing this legislation would cost about $3 million annually.

More Information

In-Depth: Rep. Dana Rohrabacher (R-CA) pointed out that although the intention of this bill isn’t to have U.S. scientists cooperate with countries governed by dictatorships:

“We have certain degrees of cooperation already, scientifically - with China, which is the world’s worst human rights abuser… I would think it’s very nice to think that we should cooperate with everybody scientifically, but I don’t believe that is rational.”

A previous version of this bill introduced in July 2014 passed in the House of Representatives by a vote of 346-41, but failed to receive a vote in the Senate.

Other provisions of the bill include: 

The Director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) would be directed to provide relevant congressional committees with a report on the status of the program every two years. This report would be made publicly available, and would describe:

  • Priorities and policies the NSTC body established.

  • Ongoing and new partnerships established since the previous report update.

  • The means by which stakeholder input was received as well as summary views of stakeholder input.

  • Issues influencing cooperation between U.S. scientists and engineers and their international counterparts.


Media:


Summary by Eric Revell
(Photo Credit: Flickr user x-ray_delta_one)

AKA

International Science and Technology Cooperation Act of 2015

Official Title

To authorize the establishment or designation of a working group under the National Science and Technology Council to identify and coordinate international science and technology cooperation opportunities.

bill Progress


  • Not enacted
    The President has not signed this bill
  • The senate has not voted
      senate Committees
      Committee on Foreign Relations
  • The house Passed May 19th, 2015
    Passed by Voice Vote
      house Committees
      Committee on Science, Space, and Technology
    IntroducedFebruary 27th, 2015

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    It has been proven that collaboration leads to progress. Thus, even collaboration between the public and private sections of R&D could only further benefit humanity as a whole.
    Like (7)
    Follow
    Share
    It is not the role of the government to attempt to stimulate research. While well-intentioned, these research councils and bodies never amount to more than useless bureaucracies that end up inhibiting the very innovation they were established to create.
    Like (9)
    Follow
    Share
    We do not need to collaborate. We need to compete. That's what drove us to reach the moon.
    Like (3)
    Follow
    Share
    I would encourage those commenting negatively on this to actually read the bill. It plainly states that partnerships must be in line with our foreign policy objectives.
    Like (3)
    Follow
    Share
    It is the researchers' decision to collaborate or not. I wouldn't want to be forced to write a dissertation with someone just because the government thinks it would be nice. This hinders our advancement.
    Like (3)
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    Anything that brings us together as a species, rather than dividing us by arbitrary lines on a map, is a good thing.
    Like (2)
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    Science benefits the entirety of mankind. It's more effective and cheaper to work together.
    Like (2)
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    As the world becomes more and more interconnected, we need global solutions and collaboration to global problems
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    This world needs amazing scientific development if we want to expand past this single rock floating in space. Working divided is too slow.
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    Since the digital age the world has seen national borders start to disappear. Nations no longer have as large of a stake in global affairs, companies and corporations have an immense amount of power compared to what we've seen in the past and since the internet, an individual has the potential to have a huge influence regardless of social standing. So to think that our world is not heading towards one without nations, to think that if the US sits this out it will stay on top is fool hearty. So why not embrace it? Face the new world with an actual plan and the willingness to accept that others can help us, maybe not right away in every aspect but in a field that transcends cultures not collaborating will leave the US without a stake in the new world.
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    This could be a dangerous situation for our researchers trying to develop new weapons for the military or new items for our space program that are secret from other countries.
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    By coordinating with researchers in other nations we strengthen regional ties, and by promoting scientific projects across diverse regions we become both more open and more influential in a sector which begs for collaboration. Scientific research cannot be globally competitive, that's a lose-lose for the world of understanding and progress. By believing that we must be constantly competing in science to make the next leap in weapons technology before everyone else we create the circumstances we are ALL trying to avoid. No nation alone has all the information and tools, but together we have enough critical diversity to strengthen individual weaknesses and push forward together.
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    While collaboration may lead to better results, forced collaboration, quite possibly with repressive countries, will not stimulate innovation in the least.
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    It takes a Democrat to assume that nothing is possible without the government. IF GOVERNMENT WOULD GET OUT OF THE WAY EVERYTHING WOULD BE BETTER.
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    Why waste time on ground already covered. I swear most of the opinions are such no brainers it shows how worthless congress is.
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    We should integrate with the international community and be able to do wonderful things. We as one Earth should cooperate for the greater good of everyone on Earth. Yes certain nations should be blocked if they're notorious for violations of international law, British dictatorships, and the elk.But this law helps bring the world together.
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    Researchers already do this quite well without government oversight
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    Get out of the business of trying to direct the future of innovation, you do more harm than good.
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    This Is Up To Private Researchers To Decide For Themselves. Not Government.
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    Collaboration with allies is always a good idea.
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