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senate Bill S. 4049

Authorizing $740 Billion in Defense Spending for FY2021

Argument in favor

Congress’s foremost constitutional duty to provide for the national defense. While this bipartisan bill is a compromise, it will strengthen the military at a time when global threats are increasing and funding is hard to come by.

Sneaky-Pete's Opinion
···
07/23/2020
👍 S. 4049: National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021 👍 It's Congress’s foremost constitutional duty to provide for the national defense. While this bipartisan bill is a compromise, it will strengthen the military at a time when global threats are increasing and funding is hard to come by. I support and strongly recommend the passage of the Senste bill A-4049 AKA National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021 which would authorize $731.3 billion in discretionary defense spending for fiscal year 2021, of which $662.3 billion would go to the base budget and $69 billion to Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO). It would also authorize $9.1 billion for defense-related mandatory spending. An in-depth summary of how its various provisions would impact troops, military families, equipment, and multiple aspects of U.S. defense policy can be found below, along with amendments adopted by the Senate in the course of its consideration. I'd also recommend that the President lineline veto any attempts at the renaming any military base, post or installations. SneakyPete 👍👏 S4049👏👍 7.23.20
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B.R.'s Opinion
···
07/23/2020
Recognizing the fact and the reality that the number one priority is the defense of this nation, this bill is the best version I have seen so far; very targeted, thorough, etc. I would only make one suggestion, which is to continue to differentiate between necessity and luxury. While I understand there is a demand to do something about the Confederate names, statues, symbols, etc., it should be presented on its own. It is simply not a necessity.
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Just.Dave's Opinion
···
07/23/2020
Both jimmy carters were dumb asses. (the original jimmy carter and the second jimmy carter from Jan 2009 to Jan 2017.) Quote them all you like; you're a dumb ass too. With all of the humanitarian issues in China... obviously their economy is doing well because they are taking advantage of their people... And we are not Canada. I don't want to live in Canada. No one wants to live in Canada, that's why anytime a Canadian has money or wants to make more money they come here... it's why artists and comedians and actors come here to make money that they can't in Canada... And then they talk trash on the system that got them rich... If you like Canada, move there. If you want to stand up to the Russians, the Chinese, or whatever threat, we need to be ready. We need to pass this bill to ensure the freedom you libs have already surrendered, but the rest of us still appreciate. You libs have Stockholm syndrome, you have become sympathetic, empathetic to your captors, and you don't even realize that you are slaves. Seek help. Shut up about student loan debt. You signed an agreement, you pay for it. You should have gone to college in Germany if you wanted free college.
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Argument opposed

The U.S. shouldn’t be spending $740 billion on national defense, an amount significantly outpacing America’s most significant rivals. A smaller military would free up funding for other priorities.

jimK's Opinion
···
06/28/2020
It is time to sort out our priorities. I have recounted the interview of Jimmy Carter when he was asked ‘How did the Chinese economy grow so much over the last 40 years?’ He answered with the question, ‘How many military conflicts has China been involved with over the last 40 years?’ Well, they invested heavily in infrastructure and increasing the wealth and affluence of the Chinese people. They invested heavily in education and making scientific advances in critical technological areas and have become world leaders in a few. Yes, they cheated by stealing intellectual property from the US and others. They thought long-term and strategically and, for example, bought up 90% of the world’s mining rights to rare earth materials - something that modern electronics and electrical devices such as critical defense systems, integrated circuits, circuit boards, electric motors, lithium batteries and green energy photovoltaics require. Our country was so involved with policing the world that we did not even notice. … … … I would suggest dividing the military budget into three parts: Defensive Capability, Offensive Capability, and Operational Sustenance. Figure out what is most important in light of other national risks and needs- and then to invest wisely. My guess is that some Offensive Capability could be deferred for more important strategic goals, like educating our people and repairing our aging infrastructure. Of course, if the wealthy and wealthy corporations need military offensive capabilities to protect their interests, we can always levy a defense fund tax directly upon them; if the wealthy benefit the most from offensive capabilities, have the most needing protection - then they can pick up the tab. … … … Then of course, we have the issue of dealing with the climate crisis which is currently effecting global watersheds, precipitation patterns, arable lands, weather, ecological food chains, and increasing pandemic risks by wildlife migration into heavily populated areas. … If you think that the pandemic is hard on us and requires self-sacrifice, wait until the climate crisis gets worse and we will have no choice but to aggressively take action! … … … Our country’s greatest strength has never been vested in military prowess. Our country’s greatest strengths had been the ability of our empowered and diverse population to take on threats with resolve, ingenuity and common purpose. The threat of collective American ingenuity was feared by our enemies and the promise of our democratic ideals was envied by our friends. We formed alliances which contributed to our strength and we used many forms of positive influence to make positive changes throughout the world; our diplomatic processes were second to none, our world wide reach through our voice of America institutions honestly addressed our missteps and the missteps of others giving us a world-wide audience and great credibility, our dominance of world currencies, our economy, our beneficial trade agreements, our willingness and expertise in leading the world when in crisis - these are the things that made us a world power, these are the things that brought down the Berlin Wall - not our military prowess. North Korea thinks it is a World power because it has nukes and a strong military; it is not. When we shifted our country’s priorities to enriching our wealthy, we sacrificed the education of our youth, the ability of our populace to take on new challenges since most are struggling just to get by. We have lost and are still losing our position in the world order, our ability to be what we were, a world leader. We will continue to sacrifice what it took years to achieve if we continue to be so one dimensionally focusing so heavily on military prowess without also addressing all of those things that had made our country great. We do not exist and should not exist to just support the wealth gathered by the Military Industrial complex. Military ‘might’ does not make ‘right’. It never has and it never will. Balance and working to re-establish all of those things that had made us a great nation will.
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larubia's Opinion
···
07/23/2020
This budget needs to be cut, by at least 10%. USA: Military Budget $740 billion, one time $1200 stimulus check during pandemic Canada: Military Budget $21.9 billion, monthly $2000 check during pandemic Stop the endless wars. Stop feeding the military industrial complex. Take care of the people of the USA.
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burrkitty's Opinion
···
06/30/2020
There is no realistic way to reduce the US budget deficit without cutting military spending. 2% of the GDP or 10% of the federal budget is the absolute hard maximum of what we should be spending on the military. Cut it in half.
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What is Senate Bill S. 4049?

This bill would authorize $731.3 billion in discretionary defense spending for fiscal year 2021, of which $662.3 billion would go to the base budget and $69 billion to Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO). It would also authorize $9.1 billion for defense-related mandatory spending. An in-depth summary of how its various provisions would impact troops, military families, equipment, and various aspects of U.S. defense policy can be found below, along with amendments adopted by the Senate in the course of its consideration.

RESOURCES

Troops & Families: This section would fully fund a 3% pay raise for the military & reauthorize more than 30 types of bonuses & special pay. It would authorize an active-duty end strength of 1,345,205 including 485,000 in the Army; 346,730 in the Navy; 180,000 in the Marines; and 333,475 in the Air Force. It would also establish a Space Force reserve component, and study the establishment of a Space Force National Guard.

Professional development opportunities for military spouses would be continued, and Dept. of Defense (DOD) efforts to provide families with affordable childcare would be continued. DOD initiatives to track & report incidents of child abuse on military installations would be improved. Oversight of privatized housing would be increased, and service secretaries would be prohibited from leasing substandard family housing.

Equipment & Construction: The acquisition & modernization of several key defense technologies would be stepped up under this bill, including:

  • $9.1 billion to procure 95 F-35 Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter aircraft, including 60 F-35As, 12 F-35Bs, and 23 F-35Cs. Additionally, the Air Force would be allowed to utilize, modify, and operate six Turkish F-35s that were never delivered because of Turkey’s suspension from the F-35 program.

  • $21.3 billion for shipbuilding, including seven battle force ships and long lead time purchases for future procurement of Columbia-class & Virginia-class submarines, Arleigh Burke-class destroyers, and San Antonio-class amphibious assault ships. 

  • $3.7 billion for weapons procurement programs, including Tomahawk missiles, Long-Range Anti-Ship Missiles, and Ground-Based Anti-Ship Missiles.

  • Funding for test materials, prototyping of hypersonic weapons, and planning would be increased.

  • Additionally, this bill would prohibit divestment of A-10 Warthog aircraft, delay divestment of certain refueling & intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance aircraft.

This bill would authorize $8.15 billion for military construction and focus on the facility sustainment backlog. It would also prohibit the DOD from conducting an additional round of Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) in FY2021.

STRATEGIC READINESS

Nuclear Deterrence: This section would improve DOD coordination, insight, and participation in the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) budget development process, and improve transparency of the NNSA budget for Congress & the public. It would prohibit the use of FY2021 funding to reduce the quantity or alert status of intercontinental ballistic missiles below 400, and authorize construction projects to convert Minuteman III launch facilities to Ground-Based Strategic Deterrent configurations under certain conditions.

Space: This section would make technical changes needed to continue implementation of the Space Force; continue development of the space technology base including launch vehicles and responsive launch; and authorize increased funding for space domain awareness, launch development, and space-based surveillance capability. The Space Force would continue working with research institutions to establish critical research infrastructure and develop the future workforce.

The Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and service chiefs would be directed to report on the space-related missions and expertise within each service that should remain within each service and whether they require organized or liased Space Force personnel. The transfer of military installations would be prohibited prior to congressional defense committees receiving an analysis from the Secretary of the Air Force.

ADDRESSING THREATS

Russia

  • The European Deterrence Initiative (EDI) would be fully funded and enhanced to support rotational forces in Europe. The DOD would be prohibited from using any funds to reduce air base resiliency or demolish protected aircraft shelters in the European theater without creating similar protection, or to close or return existing airbases to host nations until the DOD certifies that there’s no need for a rotational military presence in the European theater.

  • DOD would be required to report on Russian support to racially & ethnically motivated violent extremist groups & networks in Europe & the U.S. that pose national security threats, are involved in information warfare, and increase risks to societal stability & democratic institutions. 

  • Restrictions on military-to-military cooperation with Russia and any activities that would recognize Russian sovereignty over Crimea would be extended.

  • The DOD limitations on providing sensitive missile defense information to Russia and on the integration of U.S. missile defense systems into Russia’s would be extended.

  • This bill would express a sense of the Senate that long-term strategic competition with Russia is a top defense priority that requires sustained investment and enhanced deterrence due to the level of threat posed.

China

  • The DOD would be required to submit a report on the risk to DOD personnel, equipment, and operations due to Huawei 5G architecture in host countries & possible steps for mitigation. 

  • The DOD would be required to consider 5G & 6G security risks posed by vendors like Huawei & ZTE when making overseas basing decisions. 

  • The DOD limitation on the integration of U.S. missile defense systems into China’s would be extended.

Missile Defense:

  • Additional funding would be made available for the Hypersonic & Ballistic Tracking Sensor, components for an eight Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) battery, Homeland Defense Radar in Hawaii, and additional SM-311A interceptors.

  • The DOD would compile a classified report on the integrated air and missile defense; counter-rocket, artillery, and mortar (C-RAM); and Counter-Unmanned Aircraft posture in the CENTCOM area.

Pacific Deterrence Initiative: This section would establish the Pacific Deterrence Initiative (PDI) to send a strong signal to the Chinese Communist Party that America is deeply committed to defending its interests in the Indo-Pacific region. It would authorize $1.4 billion for PDI in FY2021 for missile defense, enhanced forward posture, and improving interoperability with allies & partners. The PDI would specifically aim to:

  • Improve the lethality of the Joint Force in the Indo-Pacific, including by improving active & passive defense against theater cruise, ballistic, and hypersonic missiles for bases, operating locations, and other critical infrastructure.

  • Enhance the design & posture of the Joint Force in the Indo-Pacific by transitioning from large, centralized, and unhardened infrastructure to smaller, dispersed, resilient, and adaptive basing; increasing the capabilities of expeditionary airfields & ports; enhancing pre-positioning of forward stocks of fuel, munitions, equipment, and material; and improving logistics & maintenance capabilities in the region.

  • Strengthen alliances & partnerships to increase capabilities, improve interoperability & information sharing, and support information operations capabilities with a focus on countering malign influence.

  • Additionally, a PDI topline budget of $5.5 billion would be authorized for FY2022, and the DOD would develop a spending plan for those resources.

Alliances & Partnerships: This section would aim to develop & strengthen mutually beneficial alliances & partnerships as part of the National Defense Strategy, and would specifically:

  • Authorize $4 billion for the Afghanistan Security Forces Fund & require an assessment of the Afghan government’s progress on shared security goals & fulfillment of commitments under the joint declaration on bringing peace to Afghanistan. It would also extend & modify support for the Afghan government’s reconciliation activities to ensure it’s only provided for activities including the Afghan government and don’t restrict the participation of women.

  • Express a sense of the Senate expressing concerns about the risks of a precipitous withdrawal of U.S. military, diplomatic, and intelligence personnel from Afghanistan & the need to ensure such decisions are conditions-based. It would also express a sense of the Senate urging the government to clear the backlog in processing Special Immigrant Visa applications for Afghan allies.

  • Express commitment to the Taiwan Relations Act, which assures Taiwan of U.S. military support to ensure it has self-defense capabilities needed to resist any use of force or other form of coercion that would jeopardize its security, in addition to calling for deepened bilateral ties with Taiwan.

  • Provide $250 million in security assistance for Ukraine, require a long-term plan for assistance to Ukraine, and support NATO designation of Ukraine as an “enhanced opportunities partner.”

  • Provide assistance to Iraq and to vetted Syrian groups & individuals to counter the threat posed by ISIS, and emphasize support to Syrian Democratic Support for the humane detention & repatriation of foreign terrorist fighters, and continue efforts to transition security assistance to standing assistance authorities in Iraq.

  • Authorize funding for the Missile Defense Agency’s cooperative programs with Israel in line with the 2016 Memorandum of Understanding.

MISCELLANEOUS

  • A commission would be established to study and provide recommendations concerning the removal of names, symbols, displays, monuments, and paraphernalia that commemorate the Confederate States of America. The commission would develop an implementation plan, cost estimate, and criteria for renaming, among other procedures. It would allow the renaming of any base, installation, street, building, facility, aircraft, ship, place, weapon, equipment or other DOD property. The implementation plan would include a plan for collecting & incorporating local sensitivities associated with naming or renaming DOD assets, and would go into effect three years after the enactment of this legislation. The bill would exempt grave markers (not monuments) from the removal, and the commission would further define what constitutes a grave marker. The commission would have $2 million in funding to conduct its study and provide recommendations.

  • This bill would authorize $44 million for coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccine & biotechnology research supported by the DOD.

AMENDMENTS
  • The DOD would be prohibited from transferring bayonets, grenades (other than stun & flash-bang grenades), weaponized tracked combat vehicles, and weaponized drones to U.S. law enforcement agencies.
  • This bill would establish a grant program to incentivize the manufacturing of semiconductors to enhance the competitiveness of U.S. entities and national security. The grant program would require manufacturers to meet certain requirements, such as employing economically disadvantaged individuals.
  • This bill would increase funding for a study by the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention related to perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substance contamination in drinking water.
  • This bill would add Parkinson's disease, bladder cancer, hypertension, and hypothyroidism to the list of veterans' diseases covered by a presumption of service connection to herbicides (like Agent Orange) used during the Vietnam War.
  • This bill would require the DOD to include an element in annual cybersecurity reports addressing work with academic consortia on high priority cybersecurity research activities.

Impact

Members of the U.S. military, their families, and retirees; foreign allies of the U.S. military; and the DOD or other affected agencies.

Cost of Senate Bill S. 4049

A CBO cost estimate is unavailable.

More Information

In-DepthSenate Armed Services Committee Chairman Jim Inhofe (R-OK) offered the following statement about the committee’s work on the annual defense authorization bill:

“This year marks the 60th year in a row that the Committee has fulfilled our Constitutional duty to provide for the common defense by advancing the National Defense Authorization Act — once again with overwhelming support. There’s a reason for this: It’s because this bill is, to its core, bipartisan, reflecting equal input from Republicans and Democrats alike. There isn’t too much Congress does anymore on a bipartisan basis and for so many consecutive years — but we all agree that supporting our troops and defending our nation are two of our most important priorities. Building on the last two years, this year’s NDAA charts a decisive course of action to implement the National Defense Strategy, regain a credible military deterrent, and, ultimately, achieve a lasting peace, not only for us, but for our children and grandchildren. It does so by prioritizing strategic competition with China and Russia, particularly in the Indo-Pacific theater, investing in a modern, lethal joint force, spurring innovation at every level of the Pentagon, and, of course, ensuring our troops have the training, equipment, and resources they need to succeed in their missions.”

Senate Armed Services Committee Ranking Member Jack Reed (D-RI) added:

“This bipartisan NDAA provides our troops with a well-deserved pay raise and tools to protect the health and well-being of our forces and their families. I commend Chairman Inhofe for his bipartisan collaboration. While I do not support every provision in this bill, it makes important investments in readiness, modernization, and force protection and includes several needed reforms. I hope we can improve the bill on the floor. Congress must work on a bipartisan basis to ensure our forces have the right tools and capabilities to combat threats around the globe.”

This legislation passed the Senate Armed Services Committee on a bipartisan vote of 25-2, after the committee adopted 229 bipartisan amendments.


Media:

Summary by Eric Revell

(Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by Specialist Steven Hitchcock / Public Domain)

AKA

National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021

Official Title

An original bill to authorize appropriations for fiscal year 2021 for military activities of the Department of Defense, for military construction, and for defense activities of the Department of Energy, to prescribe military personnel strengths for such fiscal year, and for other purposes.

bill Progress


  • Not enacted
    The President has not signed this bill
  • The house has not voted
  • The senate Passed July 23rd, 2020
    Roll Call Vote 86 Yea / 14 Nay
    IntroducedJune 23rd, 2020

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    👍 S. 4049: National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021 👍 It's Congress’s foremost constitutional duty to provide for the national defense. While this bipartisan bill is a compromise, it will strengthen the military at a time when global threats are increasing and funding is hard to come by. I support and strongly recommend the passage of the Senste bill A-4049 AKA National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021 which would authorize $731.3 billion in discretionary defense spending for fiscal year 2021, of which $662.3 billion would go to the base budget and $69 billion to Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO). It would also authorize $9.1 billion for defense-related mandatory spending. An in-depth summary of how its various provisions would impact troops, military families, equipment, and multiple aspects of U.S. defense policy can be found below, along with amendments adopted by the Senate in the course of its consideration. I'd also recommend that the President lineline veto any attempts at the renaming any military base, post or installations. SneakyPete 👍👏 S4049👏👍 7.23.20
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    It is time to sort out our priorities. I have recounted the interview of Jimmy Carter when he was asked ‘How did the Chinese economy grow so much over the last 40 years?’ He answered with the question, ‘How many military conflicts has China been involved with over the last 40 years?’ Well, they invested heavily in infrastructure and increasing the wealth and affluence of the Chinese people. They invested heavily in education and making scientific advances in critical technological areas and have become world leaders in a few. Yes, they cheated by stealing intellectual property from the US and others. They thought long-term and strategically and, for example, bought up 90% of the world’s mining rights to rare earth materials - something that modern electronics and electrical devices such as critical defense systems, integrated circuits, circuit boards, electric motors, lithium batteries and green energy photovoltaics require. Our country was so involved with policing the world that we did not even notice. … … … I would suggest dividing the military budget into three parts: Defensive Capability, Offensive Capability, and Operational Sustenance. Figure out what is most important in light of other national risks and needs- and then to invest wisely. My guess is that some Offensive Capability could be deferred for more important strategic goals, like educating our people and repairing our aging infrastructure. Of course, if the wealthy and wealthy corporations need military offensive capabilities to protect their interests, we can always levy a defense fund tax directly upon them; if the wealthy benefit the most from offensive capabilities, have the most needing protection - then they can pick up the tab. … … … Then of course, we have the issue of dealing with the climate crisis which is currently effecting global watersheds, precipitation patterns, arable lands, weather, ecological food chains, and increasing pandemic risks by wildlife migration into heavily populated areas. … If you think that the pandemic is hard on us and requires self-sacrifice, wait until the climate crisis gets worse and we will have no choice but to aggressively take action! … … … Our country’s greatest strength has never been vested in military prowess. Our country’s greatest strengths had been the ability of our empowered and diverse population to take on threats with resolve, ingenuity and common purpose. The threat of collective American ingenuity was feared by our enemies and the promise of our democratic ideals was envied by our friends. We formed alliances which contributed to our strength and we used many forms of positive influence to make positive changes throughout the world; our diplomatic processes were second to none, our world wide reach through our voice of America institutions honestly addressed our missteps and the missteps of others giving us a world-wide audience and great credibility, our dominance of world currencies, our economy, our beneficial trade agreements, our willingness and expertise in leading the world when in crisis - these are the things that made us a world power, these are the things that brought down the Berlin Wall - not our military prowess. North Korea thinks it is a World power because it has nukes and a strong military; it is not. When we shifted our country’s priorities to enriching our wealthy, we sacrificed the education of our youth, the ability of our populace to take on new challenges since most are struggling just to get by. We have lost and are still losing our position in the world order, our ability to be what we were, a world leader. We will continue to sacrifice what it took years to achieve if we continue to be so one dimensionally focusing so heavily on military prowess without also addressing all of those things that had made our country great. We do not exist and should not exist to just support the wealth gathered by the Military Industrial complex. Military ‘might’ does not make ‘right’. It never has and it never will. Balance and working to re-establish all of those things that had made us a great nation will.
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    This budget needs to be cut, by at least 10%. USA: Military Budget $740 billion, one time $1200 stimulus check during pandemic Canada: Military Budget $21.9 billion, monthly $2000 check during pandemic Stop the endless wars. Stop feeding the military industrial complex. Take care of the people of the USA.
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    There is no realistic way to reduce the US budget deficit without cutting military spending. 2% of the GDP or 10% of the federal budget is the absolute hard maximum of what we should be spending on the military. Cut it in half.
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    We have a war to fight right here. We NEED everything we have to defeat this invisible enemy. We NEED a leader RIGHT now to lead that fight!
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    Van Hollen & Cardin: Who are you looking out for Defense Contractors or your constituents! Fund COVID-19 control measures and economic recovery from COVID-19 using defense funds! Until COVID-19 is under control & eradicated this is what the US population needs protection from. Since other countries are facing a similar attack from COVID-19 no other country is really able to do anything else! @Renee: Agree the biggest threats to the US are biological (like Covid-19 & other viruses) and technical (industrial espionage & voter manipulation). Excessive spending on armaments will bankrupt the US just like the Soviet Union & leaves the US unprotected from the real threats.
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    No! Time to scale back the death and destruction. No more war!
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    Person, woman, man, camera, tv. I so smart! https://youtu.be/vBxH26n6i3g
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    Get out of some of these wars we’re in and we can reduce it significantly. Congress keeps it bloated to keep themselves in office and as a income source for their rich donors.
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    Given this administration’s tumultuous history with our national security, foreign policy, and the elimination of oversight, I am wary of endorsing any additional military spending beyond that needed to cover existing daily expenses: ie solider’ salaries and maintenance expenses. --------------
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    This inflated budget is completely unnecessary for our defense and only serves as a fear tactic in other countries to assert American imperialism. We need that money spent here, providing housing and resources for the millions of unemployed and uninsured citizens.
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    No more funding bills for the military until after Congress has funded relief for the unemployed, the hungry (SNAP), schools to increase safety, healthcare workers and facilities, increased testing and contact tracing, and small businesses (truly small) that need help. Then fund police reform and racial equity programs such as fair housing and community investment. The military IS NOT the most important part of this society and we cannot keep throwing good money after bad when people are dying and crowds are protesting in the streets. Wake up, Congress, the people are speaking!
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    No more military spending. Defund the military.
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    Gut this bloated military pig. Cut at least 20 percent off. Make the military be more efficient and therefore more effective. People are crying for a balanced budget. Start here.
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    Discretionary is the MAIN WORD HERE. Why doesn’t the defense department have to submit a REAL LIFE BUDGET of WHERE they plan to SPEND THIS DISCRETIONARY Money. No one would be given $1 million LET ALONE THE $$$$Billions that the military is being given while THE PEOPLE OF THIS COUNTRY ARE BEING DENIED HEALTHCARE INSURANCE & the REPUBLICANS ARE COMPLAINING THAT PEOPLE ARE NOT GOING TO WORK IF THEY GET $600 extra UNEMPLOYMENT. THAT IS THE BIGGEST CROCK OF CRAP EVER. The REPUBLICANS ARE CONTINUING THE SLAVERY CULTURE BY KEEPING THE POOR DOWN & PUSHING THE MIDDLE CLASS DOWN.
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    The military won’t even notice a ten percent cut. The Pentagon can just lose more than that quite easily.
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    How can 750 billion dollars be justified when our front line workers don't even have the necessary equipment to tackle the pandemic! America has to stop spending these rediculous amounts on defence and start taking care of its citizens. The apparent need for this outrages amount of defence spending is a populist myth.
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    We spend way too much money on so-called defense! We’ve been involved in senseless wars my entire life. This budget needs aggressive cuts.
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    Unemployment, healthcare and hunger need to be priority! Cut military spending! Trump brand fear mongering is a con, scam. We have had enough of Trump! Put an end to the fox entertainment propaganda CRAP!
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    Stop using my tax dollars to buy bombs for Saudi Arabia. Stop using them to murder people in Yemen, Syria, Afghanistan, and Central & South America. I want my taxes spent here, in our communities, on healthcare, education, housing, nutrition, and infrastructure.
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