Like Causes?

Install the App
TRY NOW

house Bill H.R. 4644

Should the U.S. Support the Peace Process Led by the United Nations in Libya?

Argument in favor

The Libya conflict is both a humanitarian and security crisis. The U.S. needs to take a stronger role in helping all parties reach a peaceful diplomatic resolution to end the violence and promote a safe future for both the Libyan people and the broader Middle East.

jimK's Opinion
···
01/06/2020
Yes, our isolationist policies from the rest of the world, our current leadership's notion that our military might means that we are always right and can we can simply enforce our will upon others without allies is short sighted and does not reflect the realities of the modern world. Isolationism may have been appropriate in the 1700's when world communities were not interdependent, but not today. We and other country’s are co-dependent on critical supply lines for resources, production and technologies. We must protect our interests and those of allied nations. It is in our interest to work with allied nations to equitably prevent expansionism of other countries to preferentially exert their influence and take advantage of their neighbors. Turkey has shown itself to be a bad actor in this regard and I feel that their alliance and dependence upon the Russians disrupts the purpose of NATO to the point that they should be removed from NATO altogether. Given that the Libyan’s still see the United States as a fair arbiter of just resolutions, it is an opportunity for the US to re-engage with the U.N. and try to restore some of the faith that the world once had in us. We should be responsible partners in the U.N. and contribute as is warranted and necessary. This would be an important step toward re-engaging the world community in addressing the looming impactful consequences of having ignored the worsening Climate Crisis- and help set the stage for a new US leadership (please!) to tackle the requisite world commitments necessary to forestall and stop the pending global disruptions which will occur otherwise.
Like (81)
Follow
Share
Politics2020's Opinion
···
01/06/2020
Peace is always the ultimate desire of every sane person in my opinion, so yes the United States should back this. Also, it would help our standing since we aren’t very popular right now.
Like (43)
Follow
Share
KansasTamale's Opinion
···
01/06/2020
Need to try to get peace somewhere. We should help the UN who is actually trying to create peace rather than be like Trump who is going to start WWIII and would not even serve himself. He has no idea nor does he care what a mess he is getting us into with this murder & strikes everywhere. He’s trying to start a war to get re-elected. He has created 3 more articles of Impeachment if the Congress chooses to charge him. GOOD LORD PEOPLE. THIS IS BASED ON LIES JUST AS THE BUSH2 WMDs WERE A LIE TO GET US INTO IRAQ IN THE FIRST PLACE. TRUMP & THE CABINET NEED TO GO.
Like (39)
Follow
Share

Argument opposed

Previous U.S. interventions in Libya haven’t yielded positive results and the current situation can be traced to America’s role in the downfall of the Qaddafi regime, which it had worked to prop up until the 2011 civil war. There’s no reason to think this bill will bring peace to Libya.

Bob's Opinion
···
01/06/2020
The United Nations is a corrupt entity and any of its efforts to exploit people in war-torn countries shouldn't be supported.
Like (23)
Follow
Share
James's Opinion
···
01/06/2020
The U.S. must stop giving our tax dollars to an Evil Entity such as the U.N. is! That is a Globalist entity that is anti Christian and Anti Israel! They stand for a One World Government under them which will bring The Beast into the world stage! They are Anti Freedom and Liberty and supported by Evil Super wealthy families such as The Rockefeller’s, Rothshild’s and many other! There are a lot of evil entities such as The Builderburg and Skull and Bone Society! And a Whole lot more in Kahoots! We don’t need the U.N. Involved in or to have a say in our lives and freedom!
Like (6)
Follow
Share
AmericaIsARepublic's Opinion
···
01/07/2020
The UN is completely corrupt and cannot be trusted for anything. It is no longer necessary. Abolish the UN immediately.
Like (6)
Follow
Share

What is House Bill H.R. 4644?

This bill — the Libya Stabilization Act — would clarify and strengthen U.S. policy in support of a peaceful diplomatic resolution to the Libyan conflict and to deter foreign interference in Libya. It would codify Executive Order 13726 (an Obama-era order imposing financial and travel sanctions on persons contributing to the Libyan conflict) and sanction individuals who commit human rights violations in Libya, support Russia’s military intervention in Libya, or threaten the peace, security, and stability of Libya. It would also call for a political peace process under UN guidance, the implementation of relevant UN Security Council Resolutions, and for the U.S. to leverage diplomacy to end the conflict in Libya.

Additionally, this bill would require a report on foreign interference in Libya, including parties who provide material and financial support in violation of the UN arms embargo. 

This bill would authorize U.S. support for efforts to: 

  • Strengthen good governance in Libya;

  • Promote anti-corruption efforts in Libya; and

  • Foster economic recovery both during and after a negotiated political solution to the Libyan conflict.

It would also authorize the State Dept. and U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) to provide humanitarian assistance to Libyans and international migrants, and require the creation of a strategy to address the humanitarian situation in Libya.

Impact

State Dept.; USAID; UN; US involvement in resolving the Libya conflict; and Libya.

Cost of House Bill H.R. 4644

A CBO cost estimate is unavailable.

More Information

In-Depth: Rep. Ted Deutch (D-FL) introduced this bill to clarify and strengthen U.S. policy in support of a peaceful diplomatic resolution to the Libyan conflict and to deter foreign interference in Libya

"The United States cannot afford to ignore the Libyan conflict, which is undermining the stability of North Africa, exacerbating a humanitarian crisis, and impeding a return to UN-sponsored peace talks. Libya is increasingly exposed to severe threats by terrorist groups and other non-state actors, and foreign interference is escalating the conflict. It is essential that the United States establish a clear and principled policy towards Libya to mitigate instability, stem the humanitarian crisis, and promote political reconciliation. This legislation seeks to clarify U.S. policy towards Libya and empower the United States with sanctions authority to revitalize diplomacy, secure our national interests, stabilize Libya, and provide peace and opportunity for the Libyan people."

Original cosponsor Rep. Joe Wilson (R-SC) says

“The ongoing turmoil in Libya has paralyzed the country’s post-Qaddafi political trajectory, created an ideal breeding ground for jihadist terrorist groups of all stripes, and continues to destabilize the broader region.  I am grateful for Chairman Deutch’s leadership in crafting a robust, comprehensive, and thoughtful approach to address Libya’s instability and target those that have fueled and exploited the chaos.”

Testifying before the House Foreign Affairs Committee on May 15, 2019, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace Middle East Program senior fellow Frederic Wehrey expressed his belief that the U.S. needs to be more involved in the Libyan peace process: 

“[I]n my recent conversations with numerous Libyans, as well as foreign diplomats, it is clear that the U.S. maintains unique leverage in Libya and is viewed as a relatively neutral broker.   A more resolute U.S. policy response in this current crisis does not mean “owning” the Libya problem. But even modest U.S. diplomacy could prevent the country from spiraling into broader conflict.” 

Wehrey identified three key areas for the U.S. to focus on: 

  1. Exerting diplomatic leverage to dissuade regional meddlers form sending arms and materials to both sides, including through greater Congressional scrutiny of violations of the UN arms embargo and sanctions on logistical companies that facilitate these violations.

  2. Safeguarding Libyan oil assets and preventing oil from being sold outside the country.

  3. Using the threat of sanctions and war crimes prosecution against all sides to deter attacks on civilians, medical workers, and critical infrastructure and marginalize spoilers.

Other countries, including Turkey & Russia, are seeking to intervene and influence the future of Libya as Ethan Chorin & Wolfgang Pusztai write in Forbes:

“For Turkey, intervention in Libya is the foundation for a growing expansionist posture, enabled by the Arab Spring and driven by both ideology and economic imperatives. First, and most immediately, it buys time for Turkey’s Islamist and Misrata-based clients in Libya and their allies (collectively, part of Erdogan’s base) - and establishes Turkey as a fixture in any future Libya settlement. To counter parties’ interventions, the GNA has purchased large amounts of Turkish military equipment, including at least 25 combat drones, most of which have been destroyed in combat. 

While Russia has to date backed Heftar, Russian President Vladimir Putin appears content to accede to Turkey’s actions in Western Libya, as it serves higher priorities - not least of which, undermining NATO. Assuming no significant U.S. or European pushback, Turkey could force an eventual partition of Libya between an Islamist-Misrata dominated West, and a military-ruled East. If Turkey does send troops into Western Libya, as it threatens, and seeks to push farther, into Libya’s oil rich east, it will very likely draw Egypt into an all-out war: Egypt’s President Sisi has already intimated he will intervene militarily in Libya to protect Egypt’s interests. That may impact, among other things, traffic through the Suez Canal.”

This legislation has three bipartisan cosponsors, including two Democrats and one Republican.


Of Note: Libya has struggled to rebuild state institutions since the October 2011 ouster and subsequent death of former leader Muammar al-Qaddafi. After the transitional government ceded authority to the newly-elected General National Congress (GNC) in July 2012, the GNC faced numerous challenges over the next two years. Those included the September 2012 attack on the U.S. consultate in Benghazi (which was the work of Islamist militants) and the spread of the Islamic State and other armed groups throughout the country. 

In May 2014, Libyan National Army (LNA) leader General Khalifa Haftar launched Operation Dignity — an LNA campaign to attack Islamist militant groups across eastern Libya, including in Benghazi. To counter this movement, Islamist militants and armed groups, including Ansar al-Sharia, formed a coalition called Libya Dawn. Fighting between the two groups eventually broke out at Tripoli’s international airport, leading to a civil war

Attempts to create a unity government (there are currently three power centers in the country) have had limited success, as the House of Representatives (HoR) based in the eastern part of the country, which is a key Haftar supporter, and the UN-backed Government of National Accord (GNA) have struggled to come to an agreement. 

In late September 2019, the UN warned that escalating violence and a deepening humanitarian crisis in Libya are pushing the country closer toward a full-scale civil war like the one that overthrew Qaddafi. The UN warned that progress toward achieving a more stable, effective, and humane government had been shattered by Hafar’s April 2019 offensive on Tripoli. UN Deputy High Commissioner for Human Rights Kate Gilmore said she fears the chaos, unbearable civilian suffering, and widespread human rights violations (including summary executions, abductions, enforced disappearances, torture, gender-based violence, and arbitrary detention) will continue.

To date, the Libyan conflict has led to over 50,500 registered refugees and asylum-seekers and internally displaced over 268,000 people


Media:

Summary by Lorelei Yang

(Photo Credit: iStockphoto.com / zabelin)

AKA

Libya Stabilization Act

Official Title

To clarify United States policy toward Libya, advance a diplomatic solution to the conflict in Libya, and support the people of Libya.

bill Progress


  • Not enacted
    The President has not signed this bill
  • The senate has not voted
  • The house has not voted
      house Committees
      Committee on Foreign Affairs
      Immigration and Citizenship
    IntroducedOctober 11th, 2019
    Yes, our isolationist policies from the rest of the world, our current leadership's notion that our military might means that we are always right and can we can simply enforce our will upon others without allies is short sighted and does not reflect the realities of the modern world. Isolationism may have been appropriate in the 1700's when world communities were not interdependent, but not today. We and other country’s are co-dependent on critical supply lines for resources, production and technologies. We must protect our interests and those of allied nations. It is in our interest to work with allied nations to equitably prevent expansionism of other countries to preferentially exert their influence and take advantage of their neighbors. Turkey has shown itself to be a bad actor in this regard and I feel that their alliance and dependence upon the Russians disrupts the purpose of NATO to the point that they should be removed from NATO altogether. Given that the Libyan’s still see the United States as a fair arbiter of just resolutions, it is an opportunity for the US to re-engage with the U.N. and try to restore some of the faith that the world once had in us. We should be responsible partners in the U.N. and contribute as is warranted and necessary. This would be an important step toward re-engaging the world community in addressing the looming impactful consequences of having ignored the worsening Climate Crisis- and help set the stage for a new US leadership (please!) to tackle the requisite world commitments necessary to forestall and stop the pending global disruptions which will occur otherwise.
    Like (81)
    Follow
    Share
    The United Nations is a corrupt entity and any of its efforts to exploit people in war-torn countries shouldn't be supported.
    Like (23)
    Follow
    Share
    Peace is always the ultimate desire of every sane person in my opinion, so yes the United States should back this. Also, it would help our standing since we aren’t very popular right now.
    Like (43)
    Follow
    Share
    Need to try to get peace somewhere. We should help the UN who is actually trying to create peace rather than be like Trump who is going to start WWIII and would not even serve himself. He has no idea nor does he care what a mess he is getting us into with this murder & strikes everywhere. He’s trying to start a war to get re-elected. He has created 3 more articles of Impeachment if the Congress chooses to charge him. GOOD LORD PEOPLE. THIS IS BASED ON LIES JUST AS THE BUSH2 WMDs WERE A LIE TO GET US INTO IRAQ IN THE FIRST PLACE. TRUMP & THE CABINET NEED TO GO.
    Like (39)
    Follow
    Share
    Oil. Again. It’s always about the effing oil. Not the people, or their suffering. It’s maintaining proxy controls over the oil. I know we probably have too, but Man... F you guys and your warmongering.
    Like (33)
    Follow
    Share
    If as a nation we want fewer refugees then we should be willing to rebuild the wartorn places they are from so they can return if so desired. We as a nation should be more than willing to rebuild any nation we had a hand in destabilizing.
    Like (23)
    Follow
    Share
    Yes, but who would trust the U.S. to keep any agreement. The U.S. supporting any UN brokered treaty may be the best way to end it. It will be years before the U.S. will be trusted to keep an agreement from one Administration to the next. We have Trump and Republicans to thank for our current status. The U.S. will carry a stigma for decades. We must rehabilitate ourselves first and that’s our fault. We put this scourge in office with 40 years worth of information on his ethics and morals. Now we are labeled as well.
    Like (23)
    Follow
    Share
    Despite what this administration shows the world, peace is a good thing.
    Like (16)
    Follow
    Share
    Peace is always the viable option. Stop the suffering of people, not economic policies of money grubbing leaders.
    Like (16)
    Follow
    Share
    We should support the United Nations’ bill for peace in Lybia. The conflict poses a humanitarian and security crisis. We have the ability to help other nations reach peaceful diplomatic solutions to end violence and promote a safe future for both the Libyan people and the broader Middle East. It’s time we start taking the high road.
    Like (13)
    Follow
    Share
    Support peace not trump!
    Like (11)
    Follow
    Share
    Yes please. Let’s work together like we used to.
    Like (11)
    Follow
    Share
    Supporting peace and stopping endless wars, the only ones that benefit are the war machines that spread fear and hate. They are like drug addict feeding both side.
    Like (11)
    Follow
    Share
    Diplomatic efforts, yes. Diplomacy should always be supported in the Middle East. We can't engage physically in Libya; we've already damaged them too much. Do we have an ambassador in Libya? Do we have a top diplomat in place to lead these efforts, since Pompeo is too busy inciting war and reading from teleprompters on television? If we can engage diplomatically and have the resources, then we should.
    Like (10)
    Follow
    Share
    Peace is the goal!
    Like (10)
    Follow
    Share
    We should support the United Nations’ peace mission. And, we need to rein in 45’s lust for war.
    Like (9)
    Follow
    Share
    No war!
    Like (9)
    Follow
    Share
    Peace keeping efforts are always worthwhile, as long as it's not at the end of a gun.
    Like (9)
    Follow
    Share
    Working to support peace has always been an important and humane approach. Today, with the climate crisis, we can't do war any more. All approaches to diplomacy, communication, and conflict resolution must be pursued.
    Like (8)
    Follow
    Share
    YES
    Like (8)
    Follow
    Share
    MORE