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house Bill H.R. 1836

Should Eligibility for GI Bill Educational Benefits Be Expanded for Members of the National Guard & Reserve?

Argument in favor

Members of the National Guard and Reserve should be entitled to accrue the same educational assistance under the Post-9/11 GI Bill as active duty personnel when they conduct training, inactive training, paid general duty, or active service. This bill would expand eligibility for such educational assistance to members of the Guard and Reserve based on their service.

Andy's Opinion
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01/13/2022
Down here in Texas, Rep. kevin brady, insurrectionist and autocratic wannabe, votes ‘Nay’. I guess he feels that members of the National Guard and Reserve are only second class service men/women.🖕kevin!
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jimK's Opinion
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01/13/2022
Certainly these benefits should be available as tiered by length of service. This does not have to cost the huge amounts proclaimed nor does it mean that our full service military should have to share much of their ‘benefit’ pool. If the benefits are connected directly to the time of mandatory service the benefits for National Guardsmen, for instance, would only accrue for the time that they are actually on duty in the guard for training, meeting or deployment - which would normally be much less time than full military, unless reserve troops are deployed.
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Wendy's Opinion
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01/12/2022
Especially in Texas where Greg Abbott is using them for political gain while ignoring growing suicides, sexual assault, drug and alcohol abuse because the National Guard troops have been unable to maintain family relationships and careers in service to political fodder. Oh and stop CUTTING THEIR PAY!
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Argument opposed

Members of the National Guard and Reserve perform valuable service for the nation, but this bill represents a potentially vast expansion of veterans benefits at a time when the government is already running budget deficits. This proposal should undergo more thoughtful deliberation, as House Democrats opted to not hold an informational hearing or a markup for this bill.

burrkitty's Opinion
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01/13/2022
Education is great, but why not fully fund the VA if you are going to spend all that money? Why can’t you fully fund the VA?
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Frank-001's Opinion
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01/12/2022
Bottom Line: No! But not really no. 1. A CBO cost estimate is unavailable. 2, Lede claims the expense will be "VAST." I'd think properly Funding and Upgrading the VA Health care system should be the vastly higher priority. Up to this point Educational Benefits were not a needed incentive to get people to join the reserves / national guard. Why incur that expense now? I'd like to see what the current benefit package for Reservists / National Guards. HOWEVER, I strongly support making free higher education available to all. Along with eliminating student debt.
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Robert 's Opinion
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01/13/2022
As a person that spent 20 1/2 years in the Army and one year in a Vietnam vacation I got the Gi Bill for my service. I took some courses while in the military but did not have enough for a degree. I Took the courses mainly to max out my college courses credits for the promotion board and it worked. Some and probably a lot of reserve and national guard troops were send to Iraq and Afghanistan theaters with the active troops and face the exact same dangers. As with any previous wars when you served in a period of time from one date to another called a campaign then you even if you didn’t actually go to the war zone you got credit for it on your records. So in this case there was a starting date of the offensive operations like dessert shield to the end of the campaign when Comrade Obama ended the war in Iraq and pulled out all troops. There was a date we went into Afghanistan and our date of August 2021 when Comrade dear leader Beijing Biden end the war there on the last day of the month. Now if you were in the reserves from the day we went into Afghanistan to the last day In August 2021 then you deserve these benefits as as like you were regular military. If you joined on 01 September 2021 when all hostilities in the Middle East officially ended then you should not be eligible except to add the individual days you were on active duty for training like basic MOS training and one weekend per month and two week summer camp days added together. So shy of another war after training you would have 22 days weekends and 14 days on summer camp or 26 days per year or in 6 year enlistment you would have 156 days active duty. This would amount to appropriately 3 semester hours in benefits. Most states national guards have an education bonus or pay off student loans after the first enlistment. That is better than a GI Bill. Maybe this bill could go through a normal mark up through the appropriate committees. I know that is hard as Comrade Nancy can’t even keep you in session a whole month in a row. Last eeek you in the house got sn extension of your vacation by an additional week. Maybe she could have had you all come back when the Senate did and the committee could have worked on this bill. My representative in Louisiana voted against this bill as I would also and how I expected him to vote. The CBO is supposed to be there to give us the true cost of these bills. No bill should pass until they score the bill.
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What is House Bill H.R. 1836?

This bill — known as the Guard and Reserve GI Bill Parity Act of 2021 — would expand eligibility for Post-9/11 GI Bill educational assistance for members of the National Guard and Reserves. The bill would allow service by a reservist or National Guard member that is entitled to pay to count toward benefit eligibility. Such service includes training, active military service, inactive training, and general duty for which basic pay is warranted. Under current law, active-duty service under federal orders for service other than training isn’t covered as qualifying time for accruing GI Bill benefits unless the service is in support of a national emergency declared by the president.

Impact

Members of the National Guard and Reserve; and the Dept. of Veterans Affairs.

Cost of House Bill H.R. 1836

A CBO cost estimate is unavailable.

More Information

In-Depth: Rep. Mike Levin (D-CA) introduced this bill to expand eligibility for Post-9/11 GI Bill benefits to members of the National Guard and Reserve when they conduct training, active military service, inactive training, and general duty for which pay is warranted. Levin explained in a statement

“The men and women who serve in the Guard and Reserve make incredible sacrifices for our country just like other servicemembers, and they deserve equal benefits for doing similar jobs and facing similar risks. This bill will bring some basic fairness to the way GI Bill benefits are earned and provide Guard and Reserve members with the benefits they deserve. I look forward to advancing this bill on behalf of the thousands of Guard members who defended our Capitol and many others who have sacrificed for our country.”

One of the lead Republican cosponsors of this bill, Rep. Steven Palazzo (R-MS), added:

“Individuals serving in the National Guard and Reserve are asked to perform a range of responsibilities similar to their active-duty counterparts, and they deserve to be fairly compensated for their work. Our legislation addresses the GI benefits disparity and ensures members of the Guard and Reserve receive the benefits they rightly earned.”

House Veterans Affairs Committee Chairman Mark Takano (D-CA) said of the bill:

“Time and time again, through natural disasters, global pandemics, and threats to our democracy, our National Guard and Reserve members have answered the call to serve. But despite taking on the same risks and doing the same jobs as their Active Duty counterparts, these servicemembers don’t have access to the same benefits. That’s not right.”

Ranking Member Mike Bost (R-IL) criticized the Democratic majority for not holding a hearing on this legislation in the current Congress before calling a vote to advance it and addressed other policy-related concerns he has with the bill in its committee report:

“I have policy concerns regarding the potential vast expansion of benefits that would be provided if the bill were enacted. There is no question that members of the National Guard continue to serve the nation with courage and resolve in the face of numerous and diverse missions as part of the operational reserve. Under current law, active-duty service under Federal orders for service other than training, is not covered as qualifying time for the G.I. Bill unless this service is in support of a national emergency following a national declaration by the President. I agree that this bar is too high and believe in simplifying the law so that any time spent on active-duty orders for service other than training would count towards G.I. Bill eligibility… I am supportive of this improvement because I question the appropriateness of the benefits that are extended in H.R. 1836. I do not believe in a tight fiscal environment that the extension of eligibility for training time on active duty is meeting the spirit of service in the National Guard compared to providing benefits for full time active-duty service. I also have questions about how this change could impact retention in both the active and reserve branches. Once again, these are the type of questions and concerns that could have been explored if the bill had been subject to a legislative hearing…
I have concerns about using the proposed offsets for this program expansion given competing priorities. Since the beginning of the 117th Congress, the members of the Majority have joined Republican members in our pledge to address the needs of toxic-exposed servicemembers and veterans as our top priority. The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) has concluded that the cost to expand health care and benefits to toxic-exposed veterans will be in the hundreds of billions of dollars over ten years3 . While the shape these benefits may take is still a matter of debate, I believe we should hold off on spending significant mandatory offset dollars, like those proposed in this bill, until Congress acts on addressing toxic exposure issues.”

This legislation passed the House Veterans Affairs Committee on a voice vote after a substitute amendment offered by Levin was adopted on a mostly party-line vote of 17-12.


Media:

Summary by Eric Revell

(Photo Credit: The U.S. Army via Flickr / Creative Commons)

AKA

Guard and Reserve GI Bill Parity Act of 2021

Official Title

Guard and Reserve GI Bill Parity Act of 2021

bill Progress


  • Not enacted
    The President has not signed this bill
  • The senate has not voted
  • The house Passed January 12th, 2022
    Roll Call Vote 287 Yea / 135 Nay
    IntroducedMarch 11th, 2021

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    Down here in Texas, Rep. kevin brady, insurrectionist and autocratic wannabe, votes ‘Nay’. I guess he feels that members of the National Guard and Reserve are only second class service men/women.🖕kevin!
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    Education is great, but why not fully fund the VA if you are going to spend all that money? Why can’t you fully fund the VA?
    Like (12)
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    Certainly these benefits should be available as tiered by length of service. This does not have to cost the huge amounts proclaimed nor does it mean that our full service military should have to share much of their ‘benefit’ pool. If the benefits are connected directly to the time of mandatory service the benefits for National Guardsmen, for instance, would only accrue for the time that they are actually on duty in the guard for training, meeting or deployment - which would normally be much less time than full military, unless reserve troops are deployed.
    Like (22)
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    Especially in Texas where Greg Abbott is using them for political gain while ignoring growing suicides, sexual assault, drug and alcohol abuse because the National Guard troops have been unable to maintain family relationships and careers in service to political fodder. Oh and stop CUTTING THEIR PAY!
    Like (21)
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    If anyone deserves it, it would be our military members.
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    They serve in war zones as well as local matters. For many, the one weekend a month and two weeks in the summer aren’t the only commitments. As an officer there are trainings and meetings and other duties. They need to be treated as regular military service members.
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    This is a question? Why haven’t they been included -
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    Surprised it isn’t already available to National Guard. Probably should have something similar for public school teachers, police, fire, EMT, nurses all who provide essential public service which we are even more aware of during the pandemic caused service interruptions.
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    I am for making education available to anyone who wants it. It seems to me that we’ve seen the damage a lack of education causes.
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    Absolutely! The National Guard is currently serving in my state’s hospitals due to the Covid overload.
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    We as a country depend on national guard and reserve for everything from nature disasters to war to backfill positions and be front line works, plus they have another job and family they go too. Course the GOP would say what would be entitlement or welfare, but subsidies are not?
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    We have relied on the NG and Reserve significantly since the first Gulf War, it’s high time to reward that service
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    I support all Americans who serve our country receiving GI Bill benefits for education, no matter what level of national service. This is a good investment in those willing to give their lives to defend us.
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    Yes. In fact, we should subsidize everyone who needs additional help to attend a 4 year fully accredited college. We need smart people with a strong knowledge base to move our country forward. Take the money to do this away from subsidizing the richest people on Earth.
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    Absolutely. I love the educated.
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    Yes, GI benefits should be extended to all individuals who serve in any branch of the military including the National Guard and the Reserves. Both the Guard and the Reserves have been called upon to provide many, many services to this country and should be rewarded for that service beyond just their salaries.
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    My dad served as a colonel in the North Carolina National Guard for thirty years after also serving with the Army in the South Pacific during World War II. I remember the many dangerous assignments that he and his soldiers faced, with courage and without hesitancy. They were called to forest fires, race riots, and numerous military situations, never knowing when or whether they'd be able to return home. Of course the National Guard should be eligible for educational assistance! Who would question such benefits?
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    Yes ! I was in the US Army the US states Andy Reserve and Connecticut national Guard they all should have the GI Bill
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    Andy Harris is a thoughtless, insensitive and callous individual. I hoped he would for once vote YEA, but to no avail. 😤🤬
    Like (9)
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    In tiers according to length of service. We should require college as part of military training as well as police. Well rounded educations makes well rounded individuals.
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