Solar Energy for Lakota Families

To provide solar heating systems to Native American families in need. In the nation's poorest communities — Native American reservation... Read more

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To provide solar heating systems to Native American families in need.

In the nation's poorest communities — Native American reservations across the Great Plains — bitter winters force many families to spend up to 70% of their total income to heat their small, dilapidated homes. Choices are few: expensive electricity, polluting propane, or firewood from the few remaining trees.

Energy costs on these reservations create hardship for everyone. The harsh cold can be deadly for tribal elders living in poorly insulated trailer homes that aren't adequately heated. The high cost of heating often puts other necessities, such as food and medicine, out of reach. The result is more suffering for a people that has already suffered too much.

Trees, Water & People's Tribal Renewable Energy Program puts the power of nature — the warmth of the sun, the power of the wind, the shelter of trees — to work for Native Americans.

Working with reservations communities, TWP and partner Henry Red Cloud, owner of Lakota Solar Enterprises (LSE), build and install supplemental solar air heating systems and plant windbreak and shade trees around the homes of families in need. The cost-effective solar heaters save 20-30% on annual heating costs for 2-3 decades with practically no maintenance!

At the Red Cloud Renewable Energy Center (RCREC), home of LSE on the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota, tribes learn about renewable energy applications from fellow Native Americans. This one-of-a-kind educational facility provides the skills and strategies necessary for tribes to establish successful solar installation programs in their own communities.

Please join the "Solar Energy for Lakota Families" Cause and help provide tribal families with solutions that are sustainable, economically beneficial, environmentally friendly, culturally appropriate, and celebrate their traditional respect for Mother Earth.

Mitakuye oyasin (We are all related)