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S Rammiya Thevar

I am Rammiya, an energetic, ambitious professional Humanist

Personal Campaign

S Rammiya Thevar

S Rammiya is gathering 100 signatures to

Making Impactive Change Stop Gang Violence In The Uk In Memory Of Umar Tufail (Hu M Uh Humz

Disturbing the peace ( Human Rights ) Disturbing the peace, also known as breach of the peace, is a criminal offense that occurs when a person engages in some form of disorderly conduct, such as fighting or threatening to fight in public, causing excessively loud noise, by shouting, playing loud music, or even allowing a dog to bark for prolonged periods of time. When a person's words or conduct jeopardizes others right to peace and tranquility, he or she may be charged with disturbing the peace.Disturbing the peace laws are covered by state or local ordinances. While disturbing the peace is not considered a serious criminal offense, it is an offense punishable by jail time, monetary fine, or both. What Constitutes Disturbing the Peace? Disturbing the peace laws vary from state to state. Generally, disturbing the peace refers to words or conduct that compromises the safety, health, morals or overall peace and quiet of the public. Disturbing the peace charges cover a variety of conduct and often falls under the broader "catch-all" category of disorderly conduct. Some examples of disorderly conduct include: *Fighting or challenging someone to fight in a public place *Using offensive words in a public place likely to incite violence *Shouting in a public place intending to incite violence or unlawful activity *Bullying a student on or near school grounds *Knocking loudly on hotel doors of sleeping guests with the *purpose of annoying them *Holding an unlawful public assembly *Shouting profanities out of a car window in front of a person's *home over an extended period of time *Allowing excessive dog barking in a residential area, and *Intentionally playing loud music during the night that continues, *even after a fair warning. In most states, the person's conduct must have been on purpose (willful) or with bad intent (malicious). It is not enough that a person engaged in conduct that merely annoyed, harassed, or embarrassed another person. If fighting was involved, it must have been unlawful, and not in self-defense or to protect someone. To determine guilt, a court will look at the particular circumstances of each case. Some of the factors a judge may consider include the location, time, place, words, actions, and the person spoken to or touched (for example, a police officer, teacher, student, relative or passerby). Common actions that do not constitute disturbing the peace may include: *Engaging in horseplay; *Simply embarrassing someone; *Merely annoying someone; *Accidentally bumping into someone; *Giving someone a gesture such as the middle finger, (sometimes even against a police officer). *However, if a person's non-violent actions are likely to incite *violence or public disorder, criminal liability may apply. *Purpose of the Law *Disturbing the peace is a law against public disorder and chaos. Laws against disorderly conduct, such as disturbing the peace, exist to prevent people from disturbing the peace of others while they are tending to their daily business and personal affairs. Disturbing the peace may be charged as part of the broader catch-all crime of disorderly conduct, which includes many other types of public disturbances, or it may be charged separately, based on the factors listed above and the laws of the particular state. Penalties and Punishment Disturbing the peace is a misdemeanor criminal offense. A person charged with disturbing the peace may face jail time of up to 90 days, fines up to $400, or both. In many instances, disturbing the peace is a first criminal offense and, if so, a person may avoid jail time altogether if convicted. Your Rights as a Victim If you, or someone you know, believe that you are the victim of disorderly conduct or loud and excessive noise or disruption, it is important to know what you can do to minimize or stop the harm your are experiencing. What Can You Do? Ask Them to Stop the Behavior If the perpetrator is a neighbor or person you know, and you do not feel physically threatened or in potential harm, you might explain that their conduct is problematic and ask him or her to stop the behavior. Should the situation escalate, you should remove yourself immediately. Contact the Police,If the harm continues, or if there is imminent danger (such as fighting) you may want to contact the police and explain the situation to them. A person who disrupts the peace is often given a fair warning by police. In most cases, police involvement may stop the disruptive behavior altogether. Contact a Lawyer,Finally, if none of the above actions help your situation, it may be necessary to contact an attorney. In addition to violating criminal laws against disturbing the peace, disruptive behavior may violate nuisance laws, in which case, filing a lawsuit against the perpetrator might help bring an end the disruptive behavior. Defenses to Disturbing the Peace: If you, or someone you know, are facing or may face disturbing the peace charges, it is important to know your legal rights and defenses to minimize or avoid penalties and/or criminal charges. Disturbing the peace is a subjective charge. This means that police are given broad discretion to apply the charge to many types of disruptive behavior. Generally, defenses to criminal charges fall into two categories: (1) "I didn't do it", or (2) "I did it, but I had to" (as in self-defense or reasonable defense of others). There is also the possibility that your actions fall under the protection of the First Amendment right to free speech. Finally, your actions in question may simply fall short of the type of peace disturbing conduct prohibited by law. Check with a lawyer in your area to find out whether a defense may apply to your particular situation. Additional Considerations: Related Offenses Offenses related to disturbing the peace include public intoxication, disorderly conduct, indecent exposure, and public nuisance. Such charges may be filed of, or in addition to, disturbing the peace charges. Additionally, conduct prohibited by disturbing the peace laws may expose the perpetrator to civil liability in a nuisance lawsuit files by an aggrieved individual such as a neighbor who has been continually disturbed. Larger Criminal Charges Because of the broad nature of a disturbing the peace charge, it is often included among more serious crimes, such as prostitution, battery, domestic violence, or other criminal threats. Often, when a person is arrested for one of these greater offenses, they are additionally charged with the lesser offense of disturbing the peace. Disturbing the Peace as a Plea Bargaining Tool Defense lawyers often use disturbing the peace as a plea bargaining tool against the more serious charges faced by their clients. Because punishment for disturbing the peace often involves little or no jail time, the lesser charge of disturbing the peace is sought after in a plea negotiation. If you have been charged with a greater criminal offense, you may ask your lawyer whether negotiating a plea bargain for disturbing the peace might benefit you. Disturbing the Peace and Permanent Criminal RecordsIn certain cases, minor offenses such as disturbing the peace are often excluded from criminal records, employment background checks, and other routine criminal activity checks. This is more common when the disturbing the peace conviction is a person's first offense. Even so, there are some states and organizations that may require you to disclose this type of information, such as on school, government, or security applications. You should check with your local state laws to find when and how you may need to disclose past disturbing the peace charges and convictions. Conclusion Disturbing the peace is a crime against public disorder and chaos. Disturbing the peace laws cover a wide variety of behaviors and vary from state to state. Typically, behavior must be willful and with malicious intent to constitute disturbing the peace. Actions taken in reasonable defense of oneself or others do not qualify, nor do actions which constitute protected free speech. Contact a local attorney to learn more about the specific disturbing the peace laws of your state, and what defense(s) might apply to a specific situation.

S Rammiya's progress

0 signed
100 S Rammiya's goal

Personal Campaign

S Rammiya Thevar

S Rammiya is gathering 10 signatures to

Tell Vogue Italia That Abuse Is Never Glamorous

Five reasons to plant trees now We will soon urgently need trees for fuel. Space heating uses 30 - 40% of the energy consumed in our homes. Our current heating sources are primarily heating oil, natural gas, and electricity (from natural gas, coal, nuclear, and hydroelectric dams). Heating with these sources is dependent on having an affordable supply of these fuels as well as an economy with decent wages and a safe and dependable infrastructure (pipelines, roads, extraction operations) to deliver the energy around the country. All of these - supply, economy, and infrastructure - are becoming less reliable. In most of the non-industrialized world, wood is still the primary source of heating and cooking fires, and has been for thousands of years. Certain characteristics of wood give it an advantage over other choices: it can be stored and used as needed, it requires little up-front investment or special technology, it can be produced locally in most places, it can be renewed, and before deforestation arises, it is often relatively cheap. As the production of fossil fuels wane, and their cost waxes, I believe that wood will eventually return to dominance as the heating fuel of choice in our part of the world as well. In most of the non-industrialized world, wood is still the primary source of heating and cooking fires, and has been for thousands of years. Certain characteristics of wood give it an advantage over other choices: it can be stored and used as needed, it requires little up-front investment or special technology, it can be produced locally in most places, it can be renewed, and before deforestation arises, it is often relatively cheap. As the production of fossil fuels wane, and their cost waxes, I believe that wood will eventually return to dominance as the heating fuel of choice in our part of the world as well. Ideally, we would all have Earth-sheltered or passive solar homes that require little to no heating fuel. However, without proper initial design or timely retrofits, most people will heat with wood again in the long run - hopefully in a sustainable and healthy way, by reducing our need for heating fuel and by using efficient technologies and forestry practices. If an area has an abundance of forests, wood from trees may be able to be harvested sustainably. If not, the area will likely experience deforestation (with all the problems that entails) and will have to import fuel, or may even be eventually abandoned. 2. Trees provide food. Trees produce many different types of fruit (apples, peaches, pears, oranges, plums, figs) and nuts (pecans, almonds, chestnut, walnut), which offer an important source of fat, nutrition, taste and sweetness. Unlike annual crops, trees only need to be planted once, minimizing soil and nutrient loss, and are easy to integrate into an urban landscape. Using permaculture techniques, a "food forest" can integrate trees with shrubs (blueberries, blackberries, raspberries), perennial vegetables and herbs (thyme, oregano, mint, rosemary, etc), and even annuals. This approach to food cultivation creates a more stable and diverse ecosystem, since the soil does not need to be plowed and planted every year. It also yields a significant amount of food per square foot. More and more people are beginning to recognize that industrial agriculture is unsustainable due to the massive quantities of fertilizer and oil required to lubricate the system that is destroying our biodiversity, our topsoil and our wildlife. If we want to have fruit in a post-peak world, we may need to grow it in our own neighborhoods - or within a few miles. 3. Trees can be a source of income. Local food and fuel are poised to return to the prominence they enjoyed for all of human history (except the last forty years). Someone will need to provide that food and fuel, but many people in densely populated cities don't have room to grow their own fruit, nuts, and firewood, or they simply don't know how. People who have the space, the knowledge, and the foresight to plant now can help meet the critical need for non-fossil fuel subsidized food and fuel. Trees can provide income year after year. A well managed forest can yield wood not only for personal use, but also for sale as firewood or lumber. An orchard can provide food for the family and for sale or barter. Anyone who plants trees for these purposes now could be investing in a source of income for years in the future. The simple act of planting a $10 tree can yield hundreds of pounds (and dollars) of produce for years thereafter, with only a little yearly pruning, thinning and harvesting. 4. Trees can mitigate the effects of severe weather. The effects of climate change are already being seen. Scientists, farmers, gardeners, and people who live in canary areas (the poles, islands) are witnessing the effects of drought, habitat change, and ice melt. Over time, the changes will become increasingly more obvious, probably in the form of more severe weather. Trees can help mitigate the effects of many types of severe and more extreme weather. They hold the soil to prevent erosion from downpours and flash floods. Holding the soil (and decreasing the soil temperature via shade) also prevents desertification and duststorms. The shade cast by trees decreases the effects of harsh heatwaves, and trees can usually survive drought much better than smaller plants. They can absorb carbon to help prevent the worst excesses of climate change, and they can provide habitat and food for other species that make up our ecosystems. 5. Trees make an area more liveable. Our lives are going to become more local. Perhaps we should start to pay attention to what "here" looks like, feels like, and can provide; pay attention to whether the places we live are places worth living. Trees help cool an area, cut electricity use and cost, and soothe the eye - all while providing the benefits mentioned above. One of the easily anticipated effects of an unraveling economy and a declining supply of oil is a need for cheaper modes of transportation, namely biking and walking. If we are to transform our urban areas to be walkable and bikeable, we will need to make them more pleasant than the baked scrubby Bermuda strips that now predominate (in Oklahoma City, anyway). A helpful, but perhaps overlooked, way to encourage pedestrian transport is to plant trees. Trees not only provide shade, but in groups and clusters, they cool an area down. The difference between walking down a shadeless street vs. a shady street in 100+ degree heat can be more than 10 degrees - the difference between walking and staying at home, in my experience. Various sources estimate that trees shading a home can cut air-conditioning costs by 30-50%, which will also decrease the strain on our aging electrical grid. When air-conditioning becomes unaffordable (or electricity becomes unreliable), shade from trees could make a place bearable. And shade is not just a matter of comfort, as many people (elderly, infants, people with health issues) can suffer from heat distress, and even death from heat stroke in extreme cases. Not only are trees useful, but they are beautiful. Their green soothes the eye. Their spring blossoms remind us that winter's harsh reign is almost ended, and their multi-colored fall leaves remind us that the baking heat of summer is over. We will need beautiful places to live once we can't escape to info-tainment all day long and a seaside/mountainside/forested vacation several times a year. Any one of these reasons should be enough, but all of them together make planting urban trees, food forests, and managed woodlots an important part of any resiliency effort. Trees aren't a cliche - they are a keystone of the environment, and therefore, our future. Since trees take many years to reach maturity, we need to plant a variety of fruit, nut, and shade trees now, wherever we can feasibly and safely do so. For food security, for heat in the winter and shade in the summer, for income, taste and nutrition, for a place worth living, plant a tree this fall.

S Rammiya's progress

1 signed
10 S Rammiya's goal

Personal Campaign

S Rammiya Thevar

S Rammiya is gathering 1,000 pledges to

Reduce Pollution To Save Animals

Five reasons to plant trees now We will soon urgently need trees for fuel. Space heating uses 30 - 40% of the energy consumed in our homes. Our current heating sources are primarily heating oil, natural gas, and electricity (from natural gas, coal, nuclear, and hydroelectric dams). Heating with these sources is dependent on having an affordable supply of these fuels as well as an economy with decent wages and a safe and dependable infrastructure (pipelines, roads, extraction operations) to deliver the energy around the country. All of these - supply, economy, and infrastructure - are becoming less reliable. In most of the non-industrialized world, wood is still the primary source of heating and cooking fires, and has been for thousands of years. Certain characteristics of wood give it an advantage over other choices: it can be stored and used as needed, it requires little up-front investment or special technology, it can be produced locally in most places, it can be renewed, and before deforestation arises, it is often relatively cheap. As the production of fossil fuels wane, and their cost waxes, I believe that wood will eventually return to dominance as the heating fuel of choice in our part of the world as well. In most of the non-industrialized world, wood is still the primary source of heating and cooking fires, and has been for thousands of years. Certain characteristics of wood give it an advantage over other choices: it can be stored and used as needed, it requires little up-front investment or special technology, it can be produced locally in most places, it can be renewed, and before deforestation arises, it is often relatively cheap. As the production of fossil fuels wane, and their cost waxes, I believe that wood will eventually return to dominance as the heating fuel of choice in our part of the world as well. Ideally, we would all have Earth-sheltered or passive solar homes that require little to no heating fuel. However, without proper initial design or timely retrofits, most people will heat with wood again in the long run - hopefully in a sustainable and healthy way, by reducing our need for heating fuel and by using efficient technologies and forestry practices. If an area has an abundance of forests, wood from trees may be able to be harvested sustainably. If not, the area will likely experience deforestation (with all the problems that entails) and will have to import fuel, or may even be eventually abandoned. 2. Trees provide food. Trees produce many different types of fruit (apples, peaches, pears, oranges, plums, figs) and nuts (pecans, almonds, chestnut, walnut), which offer an important source of fat, nutrition, taste and sweetness. Unlike annual crops, trees only need to be planted once, minimizing soil and nutrient loss, and are easy to integrate into an urban landscape. Using permaculture techniques, a "food forest" can integrate trees with shrubs (blueberries, blackberries, raspberries), perennial vegetables and herbs (thyme, oregano, mint, rosemary, etc), and even annuals. This approach to food cultivation creates a more stable and diverse ecosystem, since the soil does not need to be plowed and planted every year. It also yields a significant amount of food per square foot. More and more people are beginning to recognize that industrial agriculture is unsustainable due to the massive quantities of fertilizer and oil required to lubricate the system that is destroying our biodiversity, our topsoil and our wildlife. If we want to have fruit in a post-peak world, we may need to grow it in our own neighborhoods - or within a few miles. 3. Trees can be a source of income. Local food and fuel are poised to return to the prominence they enjoyed for all of human history (except the last forty years). Someone will need to provide that food and fuel, but many people in densely populated cities don't have room to grow their own fruit, nuts, and firewood, or they simply don't know how. People who have the space, the knowledge, and the foresight to plant now can help meet the critical need for non-fossil fuel subsidized food and fuel. Trees can provide income year after year. A well managed forest can yield wood not only for personal use, but also for sale as firewood or lumber. An orchard can provide food for the family and for sale or barter. Anyone who plants trees for these purposes now could be investing in a source of income for years in the future. The simple act of planting a $10 tree can yield hundreds of pounds (and dollars) of produce for years thereafter, with only a little yearly pruning, thinning and harvesting. 4. Trees can mitigate the effects of severe weather. The effects of climate change are already being seen. Scientists, farmers, gardeners, and people who live in canary areas (the poles, islands) are witnessing the effects of drought, habitat change, and ice melt. Over time, the changes will become increasingly more obvious, probably in the form of more severe weather. Trees can help mitigate the effects of many types of severe and more extreme weather. They hold the soil to prevent erosion from downpours and flash floods. Holding the soil (and decreasing the soil temperature via shade) also prevents desertification and duststorms. The shade cast by trees decreases the effects of harsh heatwaves, and trees can usually survive drought much better than smaller plants. They can absorb carbon to help prevent the worst excesses of climate change, and they can provide habitat and food for other species that make up our ecosystems. 5. Trees make an area more liveable. Our lives are going to become more local. Perhaps we should start to pay attention to what "here" looks like, feels like, and can provide; pay attention to whether the places we live are places worth living. Trees help cool an area, cut electricity use and cost, and soothe the eye - all while providing the benefits mentioned above. One of the easily anticipated effects of an unraveling economy and a declining supply of oil is a need for cheaper modes of transportation, namely biking and walking. If we are to transform our urban areas to be walkable and bikeable, we will need to make them more pleasant than the baked scrubby Bermuda strips that now predominate (in Oklahoma City, anyway). A helpful, but perhaps overlooked, way to encourage pedestrian transport is to plant trees. Trees not only provide shade, but in groups and clusters, they cool an area down. The difference between walking down a shadeless street vs. a shady street in 100+ degree heat can be more than 10 degrees - the difference between walking and staying at home, in my experience. Various sources estimate that trees shading a home can cut air-conditioning costs by 30-50%, which will also decrease the strain on our aging electrical grid. When air-conditioning becomes unaffordable (or electricity becomes unreliable), shade from trees could make a place bearable. And shade is not just a matter of comfort, as many people (elderly, infants, people with health issues) can suffer from heat distress, and even death from heat stroke in extreme cases. Not only are trees useful, but they are beautiful. Their green soothes the eye. Their spring blossoms remind us that winter's harsh reign is almost ended, and their multi-colored fall leaves remind us that the baking heat of summer is over. We will need beautiful places to live once we can't escape to info-tainment all day long and a seaside/mountainside/forested vacation several times a year. Any one of these reasons should be enough, but all of them together make planting urban trees, food forests, and managed woodlots an important part of any resiliency effort. Trees aren't a cliche - they are a keystone of the environment, and therefore, our future. Since trees take many years to reach maturity, we need to plant a variety of fruit, nut, and shade trees now, wherever we can feasibly and safely do so. For food security, for heat in the winter and shade in the summer, for income, taste and nutrition, for a place worth living, plant a tree this fall.

S Rammiya's progress

1 pledged
1,000 S Rammiya's goal

Personal Campaign

S Rammiya Thevar

S Rammiya is gathering 100 pledges to

Surpass Monetary System

"Capitalism, Socialism, Fascism, Communism, the Free-Market .... What good are these approaches for? These attempts are made by men who are cerebral insufficient. I'm trying to give you back your brain, which they took away from you in schools and in your upbringing. I'm trying to show you how the world works. So if you want a better world, you have to get up off your ass and make it better"

S Rammiya's progress

14 pledged
100 S Rammiya's goal