Update #11 ·

Discover why wild Porcupine favour Ancient river bed systems for their homes...

Ancient / extinct river bed systems provide the ideal stable and compacted geology for digging mammals in The Meerkat Magic Valley Reserve of The Meerkat Magic Conservation Project, which is located in a vast river bed valley. 

The concrete like ancient baked clay and calcium deposits prevent burrows collapsing on their inhabitants.

There are numerous digging / fossorial inhabitants that are protected from ploughing of their burrow homes in The Meerkat Magic Valley Reserve of The Meerkat Magic Conservation Project. 

Invertebrates all benfit from their homes being protected in the reserve soil and not only the digging vertebrates which include: Meerkats; Yellow Mongooses; Small Grey Mongooses; Large Grey Mongooses; Water Mongooses; Antbear /Aardvark; Porcupine; Bat eared foxes; Cape Foxes; Black Backed Jackal; Honey Badgers; Aardwolf; Scrub Hare; Mole rats; numerous rodent species; Certain Birds; Snakes; Tortoises; Toads and many more species.

FROM GRANT MC ILRATH THE MEERKAT MAN IN THE MEERKAT MAGIC VALLEY RESERVE OF THE MEERKAT MAGIC CONSERVATION PROJECT:

MEERKATS conservation book now on sale by Author Grant Mc Ilrath The Meerkat Man: http://uk.newhollandpublishers.com/meerkats.html

Adopt a Wild meerkat and help support their conservation: http://www.giftrepublic.com/Product.aspx?ProdID=MEERKATADOPTIT

Helping to conserve wild meerkats and their reducing habitat since 1993: https://www.causes.com/causes/483084/updates/977076

The Wild Website Your Wildlife Friendly Information Portal since 2004 with over 12 million views: http://www.meerkatmatmagic.com

The Meerkat Magic Conservation Project's MEERKAT MAGIC MOMENTS by Grant M. Mc Ilrath The Meerkat Man -  professionally qualified Nature Conservation Biologist, internationally published wildlife researcher, Director and owner of The Meerkat Magic Conservation Project and The Meerkat Magic Valley Reserve - involved with Meerkat / Suricate films with the BBC; National Geographic; Discovery Channel and more since 1993 (over 20 years of fieldwork with two subspecies of the 3 recognised).

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