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Update #3 ·

SO, How Do You Deal with Bullies?

Children and adolescents who bully thrive on controlling or dominating others. They have often been the victims of physical abuse or bullying themselves. Bullies may also be depressed, angry or upset about events at school or at home. Children targeted by bullies also tend to fit a particular profile. Bullies often choose children who are passive, easily intimidated, or have few friends.

If you suspect your child is bullying others, it's important to seek help for him or her as soon as possible. Without intervention, bullying can lead to serious academic, social, emotional and legal difficulties. Talk to your child's pediatrician, teacher, principal, or school counselor. If the bullying continues, a comprehensive evaluation by a child and adolescent psychiatrist or other mental health professional should be arranged. The evaluation can help you and your child understand what is causing the bullying, and help you develop a plan to stop the destructive behavior. 

If you suspect your child may be the victim of bullying ask them to tell you what's going on. You can help by providing opportunities to talk with them, in an open and honest way. It's also important to respond in a positive and accepting manner. Let your child know it's not his or her fault, and that they did the right thing by telling you. 

Other specific suggestions include the following:

•Ask your child what he or she thinks should be done. What's already been tried? What worked and what didn't?  

• Seek help from your child's teacher or the school guidance counselor. Most bullying occurs on playgrounds, in lunchrooms, and bathrooms, on school buses or in unsupervised halls. Ask the school administrators to find out about programs other schools and communities have used to help combat bullying, such as peer mediation, conflict resolution, and anger management training, and increased adult supervision. 

• Don't encourage your child to fight back. Instead, suggest that he or she try walking away to avoid the bully, or that they seek help from a teacher, coach, or other trusted adult. 

• Help your child practice what to say to the bully so he or she will be prepared the next time. 

• Help your child practice being assertive. The simple act of insisting that the bully leave him alone may have a surprising effect. Explain to your child that the bully's true goal is to get a response. If your child becomes withdrawn, depressed or reluctant to go to school, or if you see a decline in school performance, additional consultation or intervention may be required. A child and adolescent psychiatrist or other mental health professional can help your child and family and the school develop a strategy to deal with the bullying. Seeking professional assistance earlier can lessen the risk of lasting emotional consequences for your child.

If ALL else fails and the acts of bullying continue, consider filing charges against the child/children who are the bullies.  Don't close your eyes to a situation that may not go away on its own!  

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