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a5c7b9f00b Gosuke, born in Tatara Village (famous for its steel), has spent his youth being groomed to become the next Murage (Master Blacksmith). After vicious raids on his village, Gosuke leaves his home behind to become a samurai instead. On the way, Gosuke meets Yohei, who invites him to join the honored Oda Army. Gosuke, terrified during his first real battle, deserts the army and returns home. Back in Tatara, Gosuke meets again with Yohei, who convinces him that swords are relics of the past, and that they must utilize guns, in order to survive the raids. Shinpei, Gosuke's childhood friend, warns him against guns and his suspicions of Yohei's true motives, only to be branded as a traitor. Shortly after, Shinnosuke, the leader of the region, is shot by Yohei in cold blood, leaving Gosuke reeling. After all the destruction, Gosuke realizes that true essence of a samurai - honor and compassion - was within him all along, and that as Murage he could do more for Tatara than he ever could by wielding a weapon.
In 16th century Japan, a young man has to choose between becoming a master steel maker like his father and grandfather before him, or becoming a samurai so that he can help protect his village from attacks by the various clans which want the high-quality steel made there.
Tatara Samurai is an unusually contemplative martial arts movie, also a beautiful one with exquisite landscapes and satisfyingly clear sword battles in which every stroke is distinctive. It&#39;s also another deconstruction of the samurai ideal. The hero Gosuke (Shô Aoyagi) discovers it is better to be a traditional artisan than a samurai, and he returns to practice his ancestral calling of murage, blacksmith, forging superb, stainless steel in Tatara Village after an attempt to go out to fight to defend the town from marauders. &quot;My very existence is being sustained,&quot; he declares in a meditative voice-over at the end, &quot;I surrender myself to the flow of nature. Yielding to divine will. Letting be all that is around me.&quot; He is becoming one with bushido, the Japanese spirit - the real subject of this film. <br/><br/>It&#39;s the Sengoku Period, the late sixteenth century, the brief time when the Japanese were to develop matchlock rifles, which we see people learn how to use. There is a sense that the sword may become obsolete - or it may not; for quite some time it didn&#39;t. The film is notable for its physicality, the authenticity of the crafts it shows in action. And it is an advertisement for traditional Japanese village life. It is not ironic, and as it is beautiful, it is, one supposes, a little humorless. <br/><br/>The fine Tatara-buki steel-making technique of the Shimane Prefecture seen in this film is perhaps ideal for these rifles, but more truly has its value for traditional samurai swords also, of course. It is in demand, and that&#39;s why the village is threatened. You sense that Gosuke, with his sensitive face and big eyes and his inner calm, is not suited to sword fighting, but when the town&#39;s leading swordsman is slain, Gosuke wants to fight, and works out alone enthusiastically with a wooden sword. Through a wily old merchant, Sobei (Takashi Sasano), Gosuke meets Yohei (Masahiko Tsugawa), who sets him up to meet someone from the honored Oda Army. Gosuke makes the journey gladly. <br/><br/>The film&#39;s most intense conflict is between Yohei and Shinpei (Naoki Kobayashi), Gosuke&#39;s childhood playmate, who comes from

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