Cindy Renz LaBlanc
Cindy Renz LaBlanc campaign leader

Save the Children's Progress in Haiti as of 2/19/10

Thank you for being a member of our Haiti Cause on Facebook. Please share this message with your friends and encourage them to join the cause at: http://www.causes.com/haiti

Dear Save the Children Supporters,

More than a month after the Haiti quake, Save the Children has reached over 500,000 children and adults, providing food, medicines and supplies.

We are grateful to supporters like you who are helping Save the Children make a difference for Haitian families. Here are a few highlights of our progress to date (as of Friday, February 19):

FOOD, WATER, SHELTER

* Save the Children food distributions, in partnership with local community leaders and the World Food Program, has reached more than 248,000 people, including nearly 149,000 children, in Marissant and Tabarre over the past two weeks.
* Save the Children and partners are installing water tanks, bathing areas, latrines and hand-washing stations, which, to date, have provided more than 120,000 children and families with access to clean drinking water and sanitation facilities.
* More than 34,000 children and adults have received non-food items, including such items as blankets, plastic tarps, jerry cans, soap and other hygiene products.

HEALTH

* More than 23,000 children and adults have been cared for through Save the Children-supported mobile health clinics. Save the Children, in collaboration with the Ministry of Health, has completed a measles vaccination campaign in Jacmal.
* 140 health agents and nutritional agents have been trained on how to promote breastfeeding among moms in displaced camps in Leogane. The agency has translated internationally recognized public health messages such as the importance of breastfeeding into Creole, which are currently being broadcast on local radio stations, and is making them available to other health groups. Save the Children is establishing sites in Leogane for mothers and babies who need special care and support (e.g., mothers who are having difficulty or are unable to breastfeed) called “baby tents”. This specialized service will be running each day as a referral facility for breastfeeding support groups in the temporary camps.

PROTECTION AND CHILD TRACING/REUNIFICATION

* The organization is working to protect vulnerable children living in temporary camps by providing spaces to play and give structure to their day. These spaces also reassure parents and caretakers that their children are protected while they go about trying to get their life back on track. 19 Child Friendly Spaces are up and running in Port-au-Prince and Jacmal, with more than 3,000 children participating in daily activities.

* Save the Children is working with UNICEF, the International Red Cross, the International Rescue Committee and other agencies to help the Haitian government register and trace children separated from their parents and families and reunite them with their relatives. 27 community registration workers have been trained and began registering children at hospitals and camps in Port-Au-Prince. 100 children have been identified as separated or unaccompanied so far and will go through the Family Tracing and Reunification process.

EDUCATION

* Save the Children is assisting the Ministry of Education in a needs assessment to determine how many of the 6,000 schools in quake-affected areas have been destroyed, partially damaged or not damaged, and how many children and teachers remain in each community. The Ministry of Education estimates that over 400,000 children are displaced.
* Research conducted to date reveals that the biggest barrier to children returning to school is parents’ concern about their children’s safety inside school buildings that were not destroyed by the quake. Save the Children is supporting the Ministry of Education with transport and expertise to carry out inspections and certify the safety of both government and private schools that appear to be undamaged.

We appreciate your continued support as we build back...

About this story
  • Shared 0 times
to comment