Tammy Setzer Denton
Tammy Setzer Denton

I cannot support this cause. Home schooling opts out of the public school system. I agree that he should look into community based sports.

Heath Arnold
Heath Arnold
  • Tammy Setzer Denton

Community sports ends after grade six. Then what?

Will Rein
Will Rein
  • Tammy Setzer Denton

mine didn't

Barbara Garcia
Barbara Garcia
  • Tammy Setzer Denton

In Mariposa County they have various community team sports, some of whom go all the way up into high school.

David Bollinger
David Bollinger
  • Tammy Setzer Denton

Tax payers money. Tammy, that is a socialistic point of view!

Heath Arnold
Heath Arnold
  • Tammy Setzer Denton

Not in our small "hick" town.

Frank Bing
Frank Bing
  • Tammy Setzer Denton

Heath Arnold Go to public school. You can't have it both ways.

Heath Arnold
Heath Arnold
  • Tammy Setzer Denton

According to the state of Tennessee he can play sports at a public school. It is not my son opting out of public services, it is they opting him out. Read my other posts for further information.

Heath Arnold
Heath Arnold
  • Tammy Setzer Denton

If what you say were legally true, I would have to agree with you and fight this a different way.

Rhonda Hornbuckle
Rhonda Hornbuckle
  • Tammy Setzer Denton

They pay taxes to the public schools systems...and they take the time to teach their children. Home schooling is not a social function. They have strict rules to go by but they choose to do it ... and pay those taxes..

Aydene Militello
Aydene Militello
  • Tammy Setzer Denton

Barbara Garcia, see my comment in Mike Kelley's comment above

Bryn Mackworth
Bryn Mackworth

You opt out of the system, you opt out of the entire system. I don't think you should be able to cherry pick activities. There are plenty of sports options which are not based in schools (i.e., community based).

Nicholas Keene
Nicholas Keene
  • Bryn Mackworth

Bryn, please stop trying to use logic to convince this dad. Logic applies to a vanishingly tiny proportion of home-school parents. Does it apply to this dad? I don't know for sure because I've never met him, but from the article it sounds like no.

What part of "I don't want to participate in public education" did this father not understand? Bryn, you used exactly the right term for it: cherry picking. Public education isn't a buffet. You don't get to take some bits and leave some others....

Bryn, please stop trying to use logic to convince this dad. Logic applies to a vanishingly tiny proportion of home-school parents. Does it apply to this dad? I don't know for sure because I've never met him, but from the article it sounds like no.

What part of "I don't want to participate in public education" did this father not understand? Bryn, you used exactly the right term for it: cherry picking. Public education isn't a buffet. You don't get to take some bits and leave some others. You want your kid to participate in public-school sports? Well then enroll your kid in public school. You don't want your kid in public school but still want him to do team sports? Well then get together with your home-school-parent friends and start a team-sport league. That's what you signed up for when you took your kid out of school.

Cheryl L. Wright-Gonzales
Cheryl L. Wright-Gonzales
  • Bryn Mackworth

Homeschool families still pay taxes for the local school district. Therefore, I think should entitle them to be able to play sports.

Mike Kelley
Mike Kelley
  • Bryn Mackworth

Can he opt out of paying the taxes, after all you said "you opt out of the entire system." If you would allow him to not pay his taxes then I would agree. Otherwise he is being screwed!!

Colin K Tessier
Colin K Tessier
  • Bryn Mackworth

He's sure to practice just as the other boys, let alone keep the grade(s) up and parents pay taxes and all. But if some kid comes out of the neighborhood wanting to play on the SCHOOL team? I think not. That is where The Team study and where the team spend their days...like it or not.

Heath Arnold
Heath Arnold
  • Bryn Mackworth

A common misconception is that sports are governed by the schools. They are not, they are governed by the Tennessee Secondary School Athletic Association (TSSAA). Charter schools, public schools, private schools an homeschool groups form the teams, which can play each other. They are set up this way because of where the majority of athletes come from. Unfortunately I live in a among very rural communities where forming age appropriate teams for a homeschool group is not possible. Because...

A common misconception is that sports are governed by the schools. They are not, they are governed by the Tennessee Secondary School Athletic Association (TSSAA). Charter schools, public schools, private schools an homeschool groups form the teams, which can play each other. They are set up this way because of where the majority of athletes come from. Unfortunately I live in a among very rural communities where forming age appropriate teams for a homeschool group is not possible. Because of our situation the State of Tennessee and the TSSAA allows homeschool athletes to join any group in their district. Our district has chosen not to go along with the state and the TSSAA.

Shawn Meyer
Shawn Meyer
  • Bryn Mackworth

Right on Mike Kelly. That was going to be my point as well. Thanks for making it!

Pauline McGregor Taylor
Pauline McGregor Taylor
  • Bryn Mackworth

Cheryl L. Wright-Gonzales STOP PAYING THE TAXES SHOW THEM YOUR KID IS HOME SCHOOLED PROTEST THE TAX LAWS THAT IS YOUR RIGHT BUT GOOD LUCK

Barbara Garcia
Barbara Garcia
  • Bryn Mackworth

Cheryl L. Wright-Gonzales - People who send their kids to private schools pay the same taxes so that is NOT an argument. Your district gives you service for your taxes because they monitor the child's progress to make sure that the home schooling is giving the child the education the child needs.

Frank Bing
Frank Bing
  • Bryn Mackworth

Cheryl L. Wright-Gonzales Wrong!

Katheryne Koelker
Katheryne Koelker
  • Bryn Mackworth

Mike Kelley The parents can't 'opt out' of paying taxes--or the schools would be out a considerable sum of money (to be made up by the other parents).

Heather Pickens
Heather Pickens

No way I will sign this. You keep saying "if he chooses I will out him in a school." You are the adult not your son, you make the decisions and he has to abide by him. I don't think he should be able to take a spot in a public school team from another child that actually attends the school. Quit whining, quit trying to play victim. You are not a victim, you CHOSE not to put your son in the school, therefore you should not be able to be part of their sports team. Easy choice keep...

No way I will sign this. You keep saying "if he chooses I will out him in a school." You are the adult not your son, you make the decisions and he has to abide by him. I don't think he should be able to take a spot in a public school team from another child that actually attends the school. Quit whining, quit trying to play victim. You are not a victim, you CHOSE not to put your son in the school, therefore you should not be able to be part of their sports team. Easy choice keep homeschooling, quit complaining, or put him in public school (Again you are the ADULT NOT HIM!!!) and be can play on the team. You are not a victim when you choose the circumstances. Rules shouldn't be changed because of the choices you make, end if story.

Heather Pickens
Heather Pickens
  • Heather Pickens

*put him in a school.

Heath Arnold
Heath Arnold
  • Heather Pickens

You have the wrong idea. I would be just as upset as you if all you say was true. It is my son that wants to play sports not me. He has always had the choice to go to public school if he so chooses. I am the parent, as such my wife and I leave the decision up to him. I have decided that at his age now he knows best whether he wants to continue being homeschooled or not.

If you would have read the information provided on the site and in the updates you would know that the state...

You have the wrong idea. I would be just as upset as you if all you say was true. It is my son that wants to play sports not me. He has always had the choice to go to public school if he so chooses. I am the parent, as such my wife and I leave the decision up to him. I have decided that at his age now he knows best whether he wants to continue being homeschooled or not.

If you would have read the information provided on the site and in the updates you would know that the state department of education and the governing sports entity, TSSAA, has already made the decision that he can play. It is the local district that won't let him. No rules or laws need to be changed, only followed.

I do appreciate your comments.

Heather Pickens
Heather Pickens
  • Heather Pickens

I have read it. It is funny that is your reply to everyone who disagrees with you. I don't have the wrong idea, and what I say is true, he would be taking up a spot on a school team when he doesn't attend the school. He is in 5th grade about to start middle school, and you are letting him make the decisions you as a parent should be making. Grow up, stop complaining, and put him in the school if you want him to play for them. Stop letting a child who is just starting middle school to...

I have read it. It is funny that is your reply to everyone who disagrees with you. I don't have the wrong idea, and what I say is true, he would be taking up a spot on a school team when he doesn't attend the school. He is in 5th grade about to start middle school, and you are letting him make the decisions you as a parent should be making. Grow up, stop complaining, and put him in the school if you want him to play for them. Stop letting a child who is just starting middle school to make the decisions in the house. The district is doing the right and fair thing. There is no discrimination in place, and I guarantee any court in the country would laugh at you for trying to argue that you are. Simple logical solution? Be a man, be an adult, be a parent and tell the kid he is going to a real school starting in the fall, and actually stick to it. Have some control in your house, seriously.

Heath Arnold
Heath Arnold
  • Heather Pickens

All I can say is read the statistics. Report to me any statistics that prove your point about homeschool not being adequate.
Homeschool Versus Public School

The issue of whether to homeschool or send your child to public school is a major decision that will impact your child’s future. According to the Homeschool Legal Defense Association, 28% more homeschooled students enter college compared to public school students and 9.2% more homeschoolers graduate college. The H.L.D.A. states that...

All I can say is read the statistics. Report to me any statistics that prove your point about homeschool not being adequate.
Homeschool Versus Public School

The issue of whether to homeschool or send your child to public school is a major decision that will impact your child’s future. According to the Homeschool Legal Defense Association, 28% more homeschooled students enter college compared to public school students and 9.2% more homeschoolers graduate college. The H.L.D.A. states that 74% of homeschooled students attend college and 46% of public school students enter. 66.7% percent of homeschooled students graduate and 57.5% of public school students graduate. These statistics and more support the idea that homeschooling is far better than public school.

It is a huge advantage for homeschool parents to set the environmental conditions for their child’s education. Distractions in public schools are everywhere and there are few things faculty can do to minimize this. A homeschool environment is much more controllable. Public school students can do little to change environmental conditions such as comfort, sounds, lighting and safety. It is my opinion that the majority of students would be more comfortable in their own home. Along with better environmental conditions the student to teacher ratio is much better for homeschooled students. My son is homeschooled and has five teachers. He is using an online Christian homeschool program through Alpha Omega Academy using the Switched on Schoolhouse program. The teachers at the academy are just an e-mail or phone call away and I am here too. He works on his five subjects, math, science, English, history, and bible from 8am to 2:30pm or 3pm five days a week. His teachers and I can make any adjustments to his curriculum as we see fit. It is good that we can give him personal support with his dyslexia, and he is improving in strides. We also have the advantage of easily implementing hands on learning to enrich his learning experience. Being that he is homeschooled it is far easier to open his eyes to the relationship between reality and what he is learning. There are methods such as field trips, experiments and real life scenarios that can be utilized in order to strengthen this connection.
Research has shown that homeschoolers do better in college. Michael Cogan from the University of St. Thomas conducted studies to compare the experiences of homeschooled students with that of others at an anonymous medium-size college in the upper Midwest United States. He found that homeschoolers fared much better than others in many areas. They entered college with 8.7 more college credits than others which entered with only 6 college credits, therefore advancing faster. (Cogan, 2009 "Exploring Academic Outcomes of Homeschooled Students" p. 14) Homeschoolers had higher ACT scores 26.5 and 25 for others. (Cogan, 2009 E.A.O.H.S. p. 14) Homeschooled freshman had better GPA’s in their first semester 3.37 as opposed to 3.08 and finished the year with a 3.41, 3.12 for others. (Cogan, 2009 E.A.O.H.S. pp. 20-21) The theme continued to the end of their freshman year with an average of 3.46 and 3.16 for others. (Cogan, 2009 E.A.O.H.S. p. 21) The study completed by Cogan is accepted by the Home School Legal Defence Association for which I hold membership. Much research has been done, and you will find that all of the results are comparable. (Ray, Brian D. Ph.D. 2010 Home-Educated Doing Well at College) It is safe to say, because of the research, college students that have been homeschooled fare much better in college.
However you look at it, public school has its disadvantages and homeschool is no different. There are some disadvantages to homeschooling, but most of them can be managed. Peer interaction is something that is lacking for many homeschoolers, but that is something that can be overcome. My son is involved in many activities that give him the interaction he needs. One such activity is an afterschool martial arts program. He spends at least two hours a day during the week in this program. He learns how to cope with an instructor and the 30 or so other children in this program. My son also plays every sport you can imagine, which gives him more peer interaction. Many public schools now offer homeschool students the opportunity to play school sports. This is crucial for children whom age out of community sports programs. Many do not consider the fact that children do not grow too old to play, the opportunities move into associations such as the Tennessee Secondary School Athletic Association (T.S.S.A.A.) and there is nowhere for them to play. The intrastate sports associations are mostly conducted in public schools. Giving all students access to sports will give the children a better opportunity for college scholarships and much more. Consider football star Tim Tebow as an example. He was homeschooled in high school while playing public school sports. (I am working hard to convince all public schools to make this opportunity available.) Church activities and youth programs give even more opportunities for peer interaction. Homeschool parents can find many opportunities in their community to give their child the interaction they would otherwise miss. Without this interaction from other children and adult instructors their social skills would be severely neglected.
Another disadvantage to homeschool is poor educational leadership. Not all parents are equipped with the knowledge or ability to properly educate their child. Let’s face it, some parents are just plain lazy and refuse to put forth the effort to properly educate their homeschooled child. There is a way around this too, virtual homeschooling. This is a computer or Internet version where the student has a teacher and all their curriculum online or on the computer. This version is a virtual academy, like they are physically in a classroom except it is all online. The teacher and student communicate in real-time and with their curriculum. All the parent has to do is make sure the student is online when they need to be. A disadvantage for many is the cost of homeschooling. Homeschooling can be very expensive, costing as much a $5000 per school year and more. Between tuition, curriculum, material and supplies the cost can add up, but it is well worth it. When you consider the reasons described here, the disadvantages do not outweigh the advantages.
The subject of homeschooling is one that definitely has garnered much attention by those in and out of the educational realm. Many have snapped to negative judgment without considering the facts. While there are disadvantages to both, studies are clear about one thing: students that have been homeschooled have the advantage and that cannot be denied unless facts are disregarded. With the right parental commitment and curriculum, homeschooling is the best educational choice for children today.

Heather Pickens
Heather Pickens
  • Heather Pickens

Can you read? I never said homeschool wasn't adequate, I simply said be an adult, and either quit complaining if you choose to keep your child homeschooled, or put him in public. You can even send him to private if you can afford it. Why are you so obsessed with him playing for this school? Why not see if you can transfer to a different district. Seems you just can't be happy. I guess logic and intelligence escapes you.

Heather Pickens
Heather Pickens
  • Heather Pickens

Also, with all of the stats you just gave it shows you look down on public schools. If you are so dead set against them, then why do you want to use their sports teams so badly? You are cherry picking, and mad that the school system is taking a stand against it. Get over it make a decision. Homeschool and park sports or public or private school and school team sports. Not a difficult concept to grasp.

Heather Pickens
Heather Pickens
  • Heather Pickens

No insecurities, no inferiority, nice try though. This guy only gives 1 argument and that is to read the petition to anyone who disagrees. He is claiming discrimination, and it is not. I just want him to give a good reason why his son can't attend the school and play sports, instead of cherry picking.

Heath Arnold
Heath Arnold
  • Heather Pickens

Sorry if I misunderstood your statements, "be a parent and tell the kid he is going to a real school starting in the fall", as meaning homeschool was not a real school. That is the way it sounds.

This cause is not about the legitamacy of homeschool, I have made my argument. This cause is about a district choosing not to allow my son to participate in what the state says he is allowed. You are correct, my son can attend the school and play sports, instead of "cherry picking". For...

Sorry if I misunderstood your statements, "be a parent and tell the kid he is going to a real school starting in the fall", as meaning homeschool was not a real school. That is the way it sounds.

This cause is not about the legitamacy of homeschool, I have made my argument. This cause is about a district choosing not to allow my son to participate in what the state says he is allowed. You are correct, my son can attend the school and play sports, instead of "cherry picking". For religious and personal reasons we have the right and have chosen to homeschool.

My son has some learnigng disabilites and needs more one on one attention than most schools can provide. For this reason, previously mentioned reasons and more we have made the decision to homeschool.

We love the school and have no issues with it. We are also friends with the superintendant and his family. They are great people. He is honestly the best basketball coach and person I know. My wife played ball for him until she graduated in 2000.

We pay a $1200 yearly fee in order to homeschool our child. Public school would be much cheaper for us, and yes I believe homeschool is superior to public school. That is a fact that has never been proved wrong. (Wtih the exception of a very select few of dead beat parents.)

We are not mad at anyone, only in a disagreement. That is what makes our country great. You don't like it when I repeat the argument stated in the petition, however you missed the part where I made it known that community sport ends after sixth grade here.

Again this petition is about supporting a right that has already been decided. Whether you agree with the state's decision or not is not he issue.

Please keep a postive tone in your replies. I understand your heated argument, but please be positive.

Julie Reinke
Julie Reinke

Kids must have a certain grade point average and attendance to play sports at our school. Why should they make an exception for your kid. Either you are in public school or you are out. As far as paying taxes for the school and not being able to use the school, South Dakota bases how much money each school get by the number of students be taught at that school your son is not in that school so the school does not receive funds to school him.

Mike Kelley
Mike Kelley
  • Julie Reinke

So what happens to the property taxes he pays?

Julie Reinke
Julie Reinke
  • Julie Reinke

in a general fund for infer-structure sewage, water, roads things of that nature.

David Bollinger
David Bollinger
  • Julie Reinke

The CHILDREN should not be told no as long as they meet the same requirements as other school athletes.

Heath Arnold
Heath Arnold
  • Julie Reinke

In our state homeschooled students have to meet the same requirements of the public enrolled students in order to play on the public school team. I support this rule 100 percent.

As I have stated in others posts, since Tennessee law requires all students homeschooled, public schooled, in charter and private schools have to be registered with the state. In our case my child is registered with the public school district and they receives funds on my child's behalf. If my child or I wanted...

In our state homeschooled students have to meet the same requirements of the public enrolled students in order to play on the public school team. I support this rule 100 percent.

As I have stated in others posts, since Tennessee law requires all students homeschooled, public schooled, in charter and private schools have to be registered with the state. In our case my child is registered with the public school district and they receives funds on my child's behalf. If my child or I wanted to he could take any class at the school we choose and still continue homeschooling in everything else. If he can do that, why not play sports. It is not I opting out of public school resources it is the school opting us out.

Mike Kelley
Mike Kelley
  • Julie Reinke

Julie, are you telling me they take his taxes and make certain non is aproppriated to tge school system? No the same percentage of his taxes go to the school as the retiree with no kids as the family with 8 kids. He pays taxes that directly support the school

Mike Kelley
Mike Kelley
  • Julie Reinke

Excuse my spelling. Fingers still to big for smart phone

Rhonda Hornbuckle
Rhonda Hornbuckle
  • Julie Reinke

You need to educate yourself. Here in this community..3/4 of our property taxes go to the public schools and it is NOT cheap. We as taxpayers have a right to attend any public school function. The CENSUS is what determines WHO IS IN THE DISTRICT..

Michael Grimm
Michael Grimm
  • Julie Reinke

Rhonda Hornbuckle where are you from? Three quarters of your property tax goes to the school system? Do you even have a water system in your community or is everyone on their own well?

Tom Deschesne
Tom Deschesne

The parents chose to not have their children learn other social skills outside of their home & family. Let's keep it that way and NOT allow their children any sports skills outside of their home and family as well. yes they pay taxes but they chose it. They should suffer it.

Heath Arnold
Heath Arnold
  • Tom Deschesne

I am sorry you fill this way. I feel no child should have to suffer.

My son and most other homeschool children are very involved in outside social activities. My son is a second degree blackbelt in taekwondo in an after school program. He has also played soccer, football, baseball, and basketball all of his life in city wide and church leagues. All we practice is the right to educate our children. My son can go to public school whenever he chooses.

See that you do not look down on...

I am sorry you fill this way. I feel no child should have to suffer.

My son and most other homeschool children are very involved in outside social activities. My son is a second degree blackbelt in taekwondo in an after school program. He has also played soccer, football, baseball, and basketball all of his life in city wide and church leagues. All we practice is the right to educate our children. My son can go to public school whenever he chooses.

See that you do not look down on one of these little ones. For I tell you that their angels in heaven always see the face of my Father in heaven.
—Matthew 18:10

Pauline McGregor Taylor
Pauline McGregor Taylor
  • Tom Deschesne

I HATE IT FOR THE CHILD BUT HE SHOULD NOT BE ABLE TO PLAY ANY SCHOOL SPORTS BECAUSE HE DON'T ATTEND THE SCHOOL WHAT TEAM WILL THEY PLAY ON WHY SHOULD HE COME IN AND MAYBE MOVE A KID THAT'S BEEN THERE ALL THE TIME BECAUSE THEY HAVE TO CUT BECAUSE THERE ARE TO MANY CHILDREN TRYING OUT HAD THIS TO HAPPEN START YOUR OWN SPORTS PROGRAM

Barbara Garcia
Barbara Garcia
  • Tom Deschesne

Then set up a Home School team for that sport. Don't try to shoe horn a child that doesn't attend a specific school onto that school's team and take a place on that team that should belong to a child that actually attends that school.

Heath Arnold
Heath Arnold
  • Tom Deschesne

Barbara Garcia Great idea but they will not work in our area. Read other posts for my explanation. Keep them coming.

Heath Arnold
Heath Arnold
  • Tom Deschesne

Is my child less important than another. Or are we all created? U.S. Constitution

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.

If my child tries out and makes the team, how is that not fair. Which is more fair?

1. A new kid in school tries out, makes the team and a student player of two years loses his

spot.

2....

Is my child less important than another. Or are we all created? U.S. Constitution

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.

If my child tries out and makes the team, how is that not fair. Which is more fair?

1. A new kid in school tries out, makes the team and a student player of two years loses his

spot.

2. A fifth grader became eligible, tries out and takes the player of two years spot.

3. A homeschoolers tries out and takes the player of two years spot.

I think they are all fair and so does the state of Tennessee.

Rhonda Hornbuckle
Rhonda Hornbuckle
  • Tom Deschesne

wow. What a hate filled person against a child. IF a child tries out and is better then that is LIFE.
wow. What an attitude. Wow.

Heath Arnold
Heath Arnold
  • Tom Deschesne

Thank you Rhonda. Getting use to and dealing with how others treat you is a social skill that a very few number of homeschoolers miss out on. Yet, many outsiders criticize homeschool parents for sheltering their kids. That is the number one complaint from those opposed to homeschool. Playing public school sports is a great venue to learn social skills and how to deal with those that are lacking those social skills and choose to isolate or treat others differently.

It sounds to me that...

Thank you Rhonda. Getting use to and dealing with how others treat you is a social skill that a very few number of homeschoolers miss out on. Yet, many outsiders criticize homeschool parents for sheltering their kids. That is the number one complaint from those opposed to homeschool. Playing public school sports is a great venue to learn social skills and how to deal with those that are lacking those social skills and choose to isolate or treat others differently.

It sounds to me that you don't understand that the world is harsh and things don't always go the way we want them to and we therefore, have to learn to deal with people of all kinds. If your not confronted with it you will never know how to deal with it.

Everything I do is with God in mind, you do not have to believe. I am a former atheist. If you will go back and read, we have good grounds to stand on. That is not even an issue, we only want the district to support what the state says is fair and legal.

Heath Arnold
Heath Arnold
  • Tom Deschesne

You are correct and I agree with you. Read my arguments and updates, especially the first update. I go even further than you mention.

Rick Siegfried
Rick Siegfried

Playing sports is not a right. Kids have to earn the privilege of playing sports (good grades, attendance, behavior). Your homeschooling deprives the public schools of the monies it needs to run these programs. Why should your homeschooled child be allowed to take advantage of that funding when you refused to contribute? If you choose not to support the schools, then the schools can choose not to support you. You can't have everything; you made your choice.

Keenan Lee
Keenan Lee
  • Rick Siegfried

The tax you pay on your home and the rent that you pay go to schools. He pays taxes which go to the local schools. Unless he gets an educational voucher, he should be able to participate in the district's extracurricular activities. Homeschooling actually saves the district money by alleviating overcrowding, extra funding for special needs children, resources, and transportation. Homeschooling parents have to pay for their own materials. That saves a lot of money for the districts. ...

The tax you pay on your home and the rent that you pay go to schools. He pays taxes which go to the local schools. Unless he gets an educational voucher, he should be able to participate in the district's extracurricular activities. Homeschooling actually saves the district money by alleviating overcrowding, extra funding for special needs children, resources, and transportation. Homeschooling parents have to pay for their own materials. That saves a lot of money for the districts. There are over 42,000 students the district doesn't have to provide supplies or resources for each year. Logistically siphoning off some students should help out. I say IMHO he should get the support to send his son to participate in sports.

Julie Reinke
Julie Reinke
  • Rick Siegfried

Keenan Eugene Lee The money is sent to the state the state decides how much money each school get by how many students are taught at said school. x amount of money per student. Your taxes you pay on your home does not just go to the schools it also goes for city infer-structure such as sewage and water improvements. They are not saving the districts any money if anything they are taking the money out of districts.

Heath Arnold
Heath Arnold
  • Rick Siegfried

You are correct in some ways. We are saving the taxpayers money.

Fred L Hammond
Fred L Hammond
  • Rick Siegfried

Many schools require families to pay for their child's participation in school sports and other extracurricular activities. I just had a family tell me that because of their finances they had to tell their child she could not participate in the school track program because of the additional fees required which the family does not have in their budget. Participating in extracurricular activities in schools has become a privilege of class. Very sad.

Heath Arnold
Heath Arnold
  • Rick Siegfried

According to the state we are entitled. My child knows just about ever child he would be playing with. He plays with them in civic sports leagues, taekwondo, church and etcetera. Even if he did not know them, he should be able to get to know them. What a good way to learn social skills and learn to deal with the bullying and such as you mention. However, not a problem here. As I have mentioned many times, creating our own team is an option, but not viable in our case. Very rural area...

According to the state we are entitled. My child knows just about ever child he would be playing with. He plays with them in civic sports leagues, taekwondo, church and etcetera. Even if he did not know them, he should be able to get to know them. What a good way to learn social skills and learn to deal with the bullying and such as you mention. However, not a problem here. As I have mentioned many times, creating our own team is an option, but not viable in our case. Very rural area of West Tennessee, not enough homeschool children of the right ages within the correct districts to form a legitimate team. Please read other posts....... Not stupid at all, we only want what the state says we are entitled to.

Heath Arnold
Heath Arnold
  • Rick Siegfried

Correction to Keenan Eugene Lee's post. 42,000 homeschooled students in the state of Tennessee.

Mike Kelley
Mike Kelley
  • Rick Siegfried

He still supports the school through taxes.

Michael Grimm
Michael Grimm
  • Rick Siegfried

Heath Arnold NOT

Joann Miehl-Miller
Joann Miehl-Miller

Whether
home schooled or public schooled, school taxes are being paid. Therefore, they should be able to participate. There are multitudes of public school students who do not participate in extra-curricular activiites (their loss). Home schooled participants must be held to the same standards and expectations (attending practice, being on time) regardless of their home school schedule.

Mary Miehl
Mary Miehl
  • Joann Miehl-Miller

How will the grade averages and attendance be measured and documented. The public school students have to maintain at least a C average and not be absent from school on the day on an event. How will this be proven.

Heath Arnold
Heath Arnold
  • Joann Miehl-Miller

Valuable comments. I agree standards must be the same across the board. In our case grades, attendance and such are recording by the distance learning academy and reported to our public schools district office. My child has to sign in and out of his online classes as well as everything he does and 'clicks' is recorded with time stamps. The school can be provided a password to check his status at any given time.

I don't agree with the C average idea that is too lenient. Homeschooled...

Valuable comments. I agree standards must be the same across the board. In our case grades, attendance and such are recording by the distance learning academy and reported to our public schools district office. My child has to sign in and out of his online classes as well as everything he does and 'clicks' is recorded with time stamps. The school can be provided a password to check his status at any given time.

I don't agree with the C average idea that is too lenient. Homeschooled children should not be held to a letter grade, but a number grade. Too often, and in my child's case, the schools grading scale differs from that of the child. It should all line up with the public school and the sports governing agency.

Joann Miehl-Miller
Joann Miehl-Miller
  • Joann Miehl-Miller

Holy cow! Wait a minute. This is why I shouldn't make comments before my third cup of coffee. 1) I'm coming from home schoolers winning the right in the end, so why waste money on legal fees.

Joann Miehl-Miller
Joann Miehl-Miller
  • Joann Miehl-Miller

Sorry, I wasn't finished. 2) By expectations and standards, I meant those of the sport. I foolishly forgot about academic standards. I had personal experience w/ home schoolers w/ one of my kids and it wasn't handled well. THe home school kids cut practice, showed up late for games, etc., and still got major playing time.

Heath Arnold
Heath Arnold
  • Joann Miehl-Miller

It sounds like in the case you speak of they were either "afraid" of punishing the homeschoolers or they were the type of coach that let all the "good" players play, if indeed they were good... I am obviously in support of total equality and fairness, holding everyone to the same standard.

Michele Trainor
Michele Trainor

Public schools receive funding for each student enrolled - part of which goes towards extracurricular activities. Is the homeschooled dad willing to pay this base allotment? And if the school is not good enough for the his students to attend on a daily basis, why is their sports program any different? Unless your homeschool is part of the district and you are willing to compensate for the additional costs the answer is no.

Heath Arnold
Heath Arnold
  • Michele Trainor

Our taxes pay for our child's an that of others registered with the district. Per state law our child is registered therefore funds go to the district just as that of others.

If your comment were correct the argument is still wrong. Hypothetically, I would pay no more taxes if my child were enrolled. regardless of his enrollment, and he is, a portion of all taxpayers taxes pay for the public schools. I do pay taxes and my child does not attend, can I opt out of paying for the education...

Our taxes pay for our child's an that of others registered with the district. Per state law our child is registered therefore funds go to the district just as that of others.

If your comment were correct the argument is still wrong. Hypothetically, I would pay no more taxes if my child were enrolled. regardless of his enrollment, and he is, a portion of all taxpayers taxes pay for the public schools. I do pay taxes and my child does not attend, can I opt out of paying for the education of others? Nope. Since my child is registered this argument does not apply anyway.

Since you ask. First one to make the statement, Good job! Seriously. Our homeschool is registered with the district. All homeschools have to be per state law. And yes my taxes do cover the cost.

Heath Arnold
Heath Arnold
  • Michele Trainor

Alpha Omega Academy is a great homeschool Academy registered and approved by the state of Tennessee. Also, every homeschooled children from fifth grade on must be registered with the district. My son has five teachers, including myself on his online campus. He frequently talks to his teachers via phone and internet. That is a five to one student teacher ratio. How can you argue with that.

Barbara Garcia
Barbara Garcia
  • Michele Trainor

Heath Arnold: If your son is enrolled in Alpha Omega Academy why aren't they providing the sport's program you want him in?

Heath Arnold
Heath Arnold
  • Michele Trainor

It is a distance learning center. He is enrolled online. Similar to online college programs, but with more teacher and peer interaction. Good question.

Heath Arnold
Heath Arnold
  • Michele Trainor

It is a distance learning Academy, similar to online college.

Diane Adams
Diane Adams

Home schooled kids do NOT earn ADA (Average Daily Attendance) monies for the school dostrict. I'm not sure about this one...

Diane Adams
Diane Adams
  • Diane Adams

The home schooling families I've known are doing mostly on-line Christian-based curriculum...not through the district at all. There is a home schooling academy now in EGUSD and the kids meet with a credentialed teacher. This keeps the ADA coming to the district because the students are enrolled in the academy.

Heath Arnold
Heath Arnold
  • Diane Adams

Your information is incorrect. The Tennessee Department of Education has the same A.D.A. requirement for homeschoolers and public school attendees, 4 1/2 hours.

The state receives funding for its service in all cases. Accredited academies are approved by the T.D.E. and are required to report the the T.D.E. on behalf of the student. homeschooled students, once in the fifth grade, must report to their local local district and take standard tests.

Many think it is not fair that...

Your information is incorrect. The Tennessee Department of Education has the same A.D.A. requirement for homeschoolers and public school attendees, 4 1/2 hours.

The state receives funding for its service in all cases. Accredited academies are approved by the T.D.E. and are required to report the the T.D.E. on behalf of the student. homeschooled students, once in the fifth grade, must report to their local local district and take standard tests.

Many think it is not fair that academy students do not have to take state standardize tests. They fail to understand that the state has to approve an academy. Thereby agreeing that the academy's curriculum, standards, and testing meets or exceeds that of public schools.

Thank you for your input

Nicholas Keene
Nicholas Keene
  • Diane Adams

Heath, you must be kidding if you think "approving an academy" is tantamount to "agreeing that the academy's curriculum meets that of public schools". It doesn't mean that at all.

Barbara Garcia
Barbara Garcia
  • Diane Adams

Heath Arnold - Then if they are "enrolled" in that academy, let the academy provide the team sports for the kids.

Heath Arnold
Heath Arnold
  • Diane Adams

Nicholas Keene, that is not my words, but that of the state of Tennessee. They go over all curriculum, testing and aspects of distant learning academies, all homeschool methods and curriculum used via any method has to be approved be the Tennessee Department of Education. They make sure it meets or exceed that of public schools. Some homeschoolers not in a distance learning academy have to go to their local school for testing. The aforementioned is the law and for very good reason. Argue with the state not me over this matter.

Heath Arnold
Heath Arnold
  • Diane Adams

Barbara Garcia, again it is a distance learning center, which is considered homeschool by the state of Tennessee and most other states. The actual academy is in another state.

Davin Lassiter
Davin Lassiter

I wonder how the high school kids feel about one of their friends possibly losing out on a spot on the team to a kid that doesn't even go there. I know how I would've felt when I was in high school. I know how I'd feel if I had a kid that had that happen to him.

Heath Arnold
Heath Arnold
  • Davin Lassiter

My child already plays with the same kids he would play with in public school. He does so through civic programs. His friends want him to be able to play. According to state law, the school in question is my son's school. He is registered in the district and this would be his school. The state is behind homeschoolers and so are my son's peers.

Davin Lassiter
Davin Lassiter
  • Davin Lassiter

If his prospective teammates don't have a problem with it, more power to him. Hope it's the whole team. Because I would not be happy. If the education of the school's truly inadequate, then I have to go to an inadequate school AND compete for a spot with a kid that doesn't go there? Your kid has wonderful friends, that's for sure.

Heath Arnold
Heath Arnold
  • Davin Lassiter

The school is perfectly adequate for all children. My wife graduated from it and played basketball for the now superintendent. We chose homeschool because of our religious perspective. For the last few years as our child has grown more wise we have offered him the opportunity to go to public school. At this point it is his choice. He even takes an additional class at his choosing, bible. My son is blessed. This is a very small school averaging 30 kids in a graduating class. Thanks for keeping it positive.

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