Tammy Setzer Denton
Tammy Setzer Denton

I cannot support this cause. Home schooling opts out of the public school system. I agree that he should look into community based sports.

Heath Arnold
Heath Arnold
  • Tammy Setzer Denton

Community sports ends after grade six. Then what?

Will Rein
Will Rein
  • Tammy Setzer Denton

mine didn't

Barbara Garcia
Barbara Garcia
  • Tammy Setzer Denton

In Mariposa County they have various community team sports, some of whom go all the way up into high school.

David Bollinger
David Bollinger
  • Tammy Setzer Denton

Tax payers money. Tammy, that is a socialistic point of view!

Heath Arnold
Heath Arnold
  • Tammy Setzer Denton

Not in our small "hick" town.

Frank Bing
Frank Bing
  • Tammy Setzer Denton

Heath Arnold Go to public school. You can't have it both ways.

Heath Arnold
Heath Arnold
  • Tammy Setzer Denton

According to the state of Tennessee he can play sports at a public school. It is not my son opting out of public services, it is they opting him out. Read my other posts for further information.

Heath Arnold
Heath Arnold
  • Tammy Setzer Denton

If what you say were legally true, I would have to agree with you and fight this a different way.

Rhonda Hornbuckle
Rhonda Hornbuckle
  • Tammy Setzer Denton

They pay taxes to the public schools systems...and they take the time to teach their children. Home schooling is not a social function. They have strict rules to go by but they choose to do it ... and pay those taxes..

Aydene Militello
Aydene Militello
  • Tammy Setzer Denton

Barbara Garcia, see my comment in Mike Kelley's comment above

Bryn Wyllychuk
Bryn Wyllychuk

You opt out of the system, you opt out of the entire system. I don't think you should be able to cherry pick activities. There are plenty of sports options which are not based in schools (i.e., community based).

Nicholas Keene
Nicholas Keene
  • Bryn Wyllychuk

Bryn, please stop trying to use logic to convince this dad. Logic applies to a vanishingly tiny proportion of home-school parents. Does it apply to this dad? I don't know for sure because I've never met him, but from the article it sounds like no.

What part of "I don't want to participate in public education" did this father not understand? Bryn, you used exactly the right term for it: cherry picking. Public education isn't a buffet. You don't get to take some bits and leave some others....

Bryn, please stop trying to use logic to convince this dad. Logic applies to a vanishingly tiny proportion of home-school parents. Does it apply to this dad? I don't know for sure because I've never met him, but from the article it sounds like no.

What part of "I don't want to participate in public education" did this father not understand? Bryn, you used exactly the right term for it: cherry picking. Public education isn't a buffet. You don't get to take some bits and leave some others. You want your kid to participate in public-school sports? Well then enroll your kid in public school. You don't want your kid in public school but still want him to do team sports? Well then get together with your home-school-parent friends and start a team-sport league. That's what you signed up for when you took your kid out of school.

Cheryl Wright
Cheryl Wright
  • Bryn Wyllychuk

Homeschool families still pay taxes for the local school district. Therefore, I think should entitle them to be able to play sports.

Mike Kelley
Mike Kelley
  • Bryn Wyllychuk

Can he opt out of paying the taxes, after all you said "you opt out of the entire system." If you would allow him to not pay his taxes then I would agree. Otherwise he is being screwed!!

Colin K Tessier
Colin K Tessier
  • Bryn Wyllychuk

He's sure to practice just as the other boys, let alone keep the grade(s) up and parents pay taxes and all. But if some kid comes out of the neighborhood wanting to play on the SCHOOL team? I think not. That is where The Team study and where the team spend their days...like it or not.

Heath Arnold
Heath Arnold
  • Bryn Wyllychuk

A common misconception is that sports are governed by the schools. They are not, they are governed by the Tennessee Secondary School Athletic Association (TSSAA). Charter schools, public schools, private schools an homeschool groups form the teams, which can play each other. They are set up this way because of where the majority of athletes come from. Unfortunately I live in a among very rural communities where forming age appropriate teams for a homeschool group is not possible. Because...

A common misconception is that sports are governed by the schools. They are not, they are governed by the Tennessee Secondary School Athletic Association (TSSAA). Charter schools, public schools, private schools an homeschool groups form the teams, which can play each other. They are set up this way because of where the majority of athletes come from. Unfortunately I live in a among very rural communities where forming age appropriate teams for a homeschool group is not possible. Because of our situation the State of Tennessee and the TSSAA allows homeschool athletes to join any group in their district. Our district has chosen not to go along with the state and the TSSAA.

Shawn Meyer
Shawn Meyer
  • Bryn Wyllychuk

Right on Mike Kelly. That was going to be my point as well. Thanks for making it!

Pauline Taylor
Pauline Taylor
  • Bryn Wyllychuk

Cheryl L. Wright-Gonzales STOP PAYING THE TAXES SHOW THEM YOUR KID IS HOME SCHOOLED PROTEST THE TAX LAWS THAT IS YOUR RIGHT BUT GOOD LUCK

Barbara Garcia
Barbara Garcia
  • Bryn Wyllychuk

Cheryl L. Wright-Gonzales - People who send their kids to private schools pay the same taxes so that is NOT an argument. Your district gives you service for your taxes because they monitor the child's progress to make sure that the home schooling is giving the child the education the child needs.

Frank Bing
Frank Bing
  • Bryn Wyllychuk

Cheryl L. Wright-Gonzales Wrong!

Katheryne Koelker
Katheryne Koelker
  • Bryn Wyllychuk

Mike Kelley The parents can't 'opt out' of paying taxes--or the schools would be out a considerable sum of money (to be made up by the other parents).

Deyanir Helt
Deyanir Helt

OMG!!! Im soooo tired of always been the country behind human rights issues!!!

Heath Arnold
Heath Arnold
  • Deyanir Helt

I am tired too. We shouldn't have to fight for human rights... Especially in the U.S.

Jennifer Emry
Jennifer Emry
  • Deyanir Helt

I have tried to read as many of the posts as I can and I have a couple of questions, I apologize if they have already been answered. Is there a clause in the state guidlines that says that it is to the discretion of the district whether or not they allow homeschooled children to participate? Have you contacted a lawyer? I am a teacher is a large school district in Missouri and I have had homeschooled children actually come in a just attend my class (advanced mathematics) and then they go...

I have tried to read as many of the posts as I can and I have a couple of questions, I apologize if they have already been answered. Is there a clause in the state guidlines that says that it is to the discretion of the district whether or not they allow homeschooled children to participate? Have you contacted a lawyer? I am a teacher is a large school district in Missouri and I have had homeschooled children actually come in a just attend my class (advanced mathematics) and then they go home. I am not sure how our sports teams work for homeschooled children but I think our population of homeschoolers is large enough that they have their own teams.

Heath Arnold
Heath Arnold
  • Deyanir Helt

Sorry for all of the confusion. Most of the arguments made in these postings have already been addressed in the petition and it's updates.

Yes the state has ruled that homeschool students can partake of public school resources, including sports, but leaves the decision up the local school boards and schools when it comes to sports. There is never a problem for schools to let home schoolers take classes like the core subjects. The law states that public schools have to open their doors to...

Sorry for all of the confusion. Most of the arguments made in these postings have already been addressed in the petition and it's updates.

Yes the state has ruled that homeschool students can partake of public school resources, including sports, but leaves the decision up the local school boards and schools when it comes to sports. There is never a problem for schools to let home schoolers take classes like the core subjects. The law states that public schools have to open their doors to homeschoolers. But when it comes to sports their is a clause leaving the decision up to local entities. This is because Tennessee sports, once in high school, are not regulated by the school, but by the Tennessee Secondary School Athletic Association (TSSAA), which allows homeschoolers to play. Junior high sports are usually regulated by the school.

The rulings by the state have been misconstrued in order to appease those opposed to letting "outsiders" in. The reason we are taking this up at the local level is simply to get minds rolling and for me to learn before taking this to the state level.

Oh, because of the law as it is wriiten a lawyer is not needed at the local level. It has been tried. That is why I am going at this a different way.

Thanks for your interest. Feel free to engage me here or personally.

Regardless of the outcome locally, we intend to take this to the state level. 11 states mandate homeschoolers be allowed in school sports and Tennessee needs to be the next. Many believe, as do I, that the law as it is now is uncostitutional (state and federal).

Marsha Wright
Marsha Wright

My kids go to a private school that allows homeschool kids to participate in sports, field trips with their classes

Heath Arnold
Heath Arnold
  • Marsha Wright

Sounds like you have a great school that cares about all kids. I do not know how some people can say that a child does not deserve to gain from anything of value. No one child is better than another, regardless of race, creed, religion, educational preference, or anything else. How can anyone say that one group of kids is more important than another?

Marsha Wright
Marsha Wright
  • Marsha Wright

Christian community schools in White House tn is a great school and cares about all kids getting a chance to play sports and cheer. It gives a great diversity to our sports programs. The homeschool fee is around the price of our enrollment for students that attend CCS.

Heath Arnold
Heath Arnold

I would like to add another thought. Everyone is looking at this from a personal perspective. We each have our own opinions and that is great. From a legal perspective there is no reason why he cannot play. I'm sure that will be argued too, however, the argument has already been decided by the state and the state is on my side.

Symantha Harfst Raley
Symantha Harfst Raley
  • Heath Arnold

Hi, found you on Causes... we were a homeschool family and are adoptive foster parents of two. You may try contacting Coach Rick. He has spread athletics across the globe and knows many famous people. He even ran with the olympics' torch. http://chaasaints.org/ and https://www.facebook.com/chaasaints

Heath Arnold
Heath Arnold
  • Heath Arnold

Thanks a million.

Katt James
Katt James

I'm sorry, but I will not sign this. If you chose to have your child learn from home and not go to the school, he should not be allowed to go to the school just to play. If he really wants to play football, sign him up for a community team.

Heath Arnold
Heath Arnold
  • Katt James

Thanks for you input. Although I obviously don't agree, I value your input.

David Bollinger
David Bollinger
  • Katt James

Ditto Heath's comment! What about the CHILDREN Katheryn Rose? They cannot opt out of school. What is the damage? Every kid should be playing a sport or be involved in a sanctioned activity with their peers. It's about the CHILDREN!

Erica Wilkinson
Erica Wilkinson

We have to pay taxes for the public school system, so why shouldn't we be able to play in their sports team

Erica Wilkinson
Erica Wilkinson
  • Erica Wilkinson

*teams?

Heath Arnold
Heath Arnold
  • Erica Wilkinson

There is no legitimate reason. Don't worry, I type too fast too...

Jillian Holland
Jillian Holland

I was a home schooled child. Yes, it would be a good opportunity for this child to get some social skills outside of his home & family. Yes, sports builds team building skills, is great for exercise etc... However, this child should not be allowed to join a sports team at this school because he does not attend this school. It would be like going to the school you are you are enrolled in, but then joining the sports team at the school down the road instead of your own. If these parents want...

I was a home schooled child. Yes, it would be a good opportunity for this child to get some social skills outside of his home & family. Yes, sports builds team building skills, is great for exercise etc... However, this child should not be allowed to join a sports team at this school because he does not attend this school. It would be like going to the school you are you are enrolled in, but then joining the sports team at the school down the road instead of your own. If these parents want their child to be on the school sports team they should have to enroll him into the school.

Heath Arnold
Heath Arnold
  • Jillian Holland

He is enrolled in the district and this would be the school he would attend if he ever chooses to do so. Again, read my prior posts. Sports in Tennessee are regulated by the TSSAA not the schools. The schools abide by the TSSAA rules. Junior high which he would qualify next year are not TSSAA regulated, however you have to play your eighth grade year in order to not get red shirted in ninth grade. He needs and is qualified to play in junior high according to the state of Tennessee. This district chooses to go against status quo.

Heath Arnold
Heath Arnold
  • Jillian Holland

Jill, whether you agree he should be able to join or not is not the issue here. The state says that all homeschooled kids can play sports, take supplemental class, & etc. at the nearest school in the district for which they are registered. According to state law he has a right to the facilities, services & activities. He has to follow the same rules/laws that all other children have to. He cannot use a school facility outside of the school appointed by the district. If you think he can...

Jill, whether you agree he should be able to join or not is not the issue here. The state says that all homeschooled kids can play sports, take supplemental class, & etc. at the nearest school in the district for which they are registered. According to state law he has a right to the facilities, services & activities. He has to follow the same rules/laws that all other children have to. He cannot use a school facility outside of the school appointed by the district. If you think he can play against a full team by himself, then you think he is better I do. Your theory about a student going to play at another school is faulty. The ruling is on our side and the school board is abusing the "choice" clause.

Sarah Patterer
Sarah Patterer

yes I believe home schooled children should have the same rights as schhol children with sports activities.

Heath Arnold
Heath Arnold
  • Sarah Patterer

I am tired too. We shouldn't have to fight for human rights... Especially in the U.S.

Heath Arnold
Heath Arnold
  • Sarah Patterer

Oops. Wrong post (-:

Heather Burnes
Heather Burnes

No way I will sign this. You keep saying "if he chooses I will out him in a school." You are the adult not your son, you make the decisions and he has to abide by him. I don't think he should be able to take a spot in a public school team from another child that actually attends the school. Quit whining, quit trying to play victim. You are not a victim, you CHOSE not to put your son in the school, therefore you should not be able to be part of their sports team. Easy choice keep...

No way I will sign this. You keep saying "if he chooses I will out him in a school." You are the adult not your son, you make the decisions and he has to abide by him. I don't think he should be able to take a spot in a public school team from another child that actually attends the school. Quit whining, quit trying to play victim. You are not a victim, you CHOSE not to put your son in the school, therefore you should not be able to be part of their sports team. Easy choice keep homeschooling, quit complaining, or put him in public school (Again you are the ADULT NOT HIM!!!) and be can play on the team. You are not a victim when you choose the circumstances. Rules shouldn't be changed because of the choices you make, end if story.

Heather Burnes
Heather Burnes
  • Heather Burnes

*put him in a school.

Heath Arnold
Heath Arnold
  • Heather Burnes

You have the wrong idea. I would be just as upset as you if all you say was true. It is my son that wants to play sports not me. He has always had the choice to go to public school if he so chooses. I am the parent, as such my wife and I leave the decision up to him. I have decided that at his age now he knows best whether he wants to continue being homeschooled or not.

If you would have read the information provided on the site and in the updates you would know that the state...

You have the wrong idea. I would be just as upset as you if all you say was true. It is my son that wants to play sports not me. He has always had the choice to go to public school if he so chooses. I am the parent, as such my wife and I leave the decision up to him. I have decided that at his age now he knows best whether he wants to continue being homeschooled or not.

If you would have read the information provided on the site and in the updates you would know that the state department of education and the governing sports entity, TSSAA, has already made the decision that he can play. It is the local district that won't let him. No rules or laws need to be changed, only followed.

I do appreciate your comments.

Heather Burnes
Heather Burnes
  • Heather Burnes

I have read it. It is funny that is your reply to everyone who disagrees with you. I don't have the wrong idea, and what I say is true, he would be taking up a spot on a school team when he doesn't attend the school. He is in 5th grade about to start middle school, and you are letting him make the decisions you as a parent should be making. Grow up, stop complaining, and put him in the school if you want him to play for them. Stop letting a child who is just starting middle school to...

I have read it. It is funny that is your reply to everyone who disagrees with you. I don't have the wrong idea, and what I say is true, he would be taking up a spot on a school team when he doesn't attend the school. He is in 5th grade about to start middle school, and you are letting him make the decisions you as a parent should be making. Grow up, stop complaining, and put him in the school if you want him to play for them. Stop letting a child who is just starting middle school to make the decisions in the house. The district is doing the right and fair thing. There is no discrimination in place, and I guarantee any court in the country would laugh at you for trying to argue that you are. Simple logical solution? Be a man, be an adult, be a parent and tell the kid he is going to a real school starting in the fall, and actually stick to it. Have some control in your house, seriously.

Heath Arnold
Heath Arnold
  • Heather Burnes

All I can say is read the statistics. Report to me any statistics that prove your point about homeschool not being adequate.
Homeschool Versus Public School

The issue of whether to homeschool or send your child to public school is a major decision that will impact your child’s future. According to the Homeschool Legal Defense Association, 28% more homeschooled students enter college compared to public school students and 9.2% more homeschoolers graduate college. The H.L.D.A. states that...

All I can say is read the statistics. Report to me any statistics that prove your point about homeschool not being adequate.
Homeschool Versus Public School

The issue of whether to homeschool or send your child to public school is a major decision that will impact your child’s future. According to the Homeschool Legal Defense Association, 28% more homeschooled students enter college compared to public school students and 9.2% more homeschoolers graduate college. The H.L.D.A. states that 74% of homeschooled students attend college and 46% of public school students enter. 66.7% percent of homeschooled students graduate and 57.5% of public school students graduate. These statistics and more support the idea that homeschooling is far better than public school.

It is a huge advantage for homeschool parents to set the environmental conditions for their child’s education. Distractions in public schools are everywhere and there are few things faculty can do to minimize this. A homeschool environment is much more controllable. Public school students can do little to change environmental conditions such as comfort, sounds, lighting and safety. It is my opinion that the majority of students would be more comfortable in their own home. Along with better environmental conditions the student to teacher ratio is much better for homeschooled students. My son is homeschooled and has five teachers. He is using an online Christian homeschool program through Alpha Omega Academy using the Switched on Schoolhouse program. The teachers at the academy are just an e-mail or phone call away and I am here too. He works on his five subjects, math, science, English, history, and bible from 8am to 2:30pm or 3pm five days a week. His teachers and I can make any adjustments to his curriculum as we see fit. It is good that we can give him personal support with his dyslexia, and he is improving in strides. We also have the advantage of easily implementing hands on learning to enrich his learning experience. Being that he is homeschooled it is far easier to open his eyes to the relationship between reality and what he is learning. There are methods such as field trips, experiments and real life scenarios that can be utilized in order to strengthen this connection.
Research has shown that homeschoolers do better in college. Michael Cogan from the University of St. Thomas conducted studies to compare the experiences of homeschooled students with that of others at an anonymous medium-size college in the upper Midwest United States. He found that homeschoolers fared much better than others in many areas. They entered college with 8.7 more college credits than others which entered with only 6 college credits, therefore advancing faster. (Cogan, 2009 "Exploring Academic Outcomes of Homeschooled Students" p. 14) Homeschoolers had higher ACT scores 26.5 and 25 for others. (Cogan, 2009 E.A.O.H.S. p. 14) Homeschooled freshman had better GPA’s in their first semester 3.37 as opposed to 3.08 and finished the year with a 3.41, 3.12 for others. (Cogan, 2009 E.A.O.H.S. pp. 20-21) The theme continued to the end of their freshman year with an average of 3.46 and 3.16 for others. (Cogan, 2009 E.A.O.H.S. p. 21) The study completed by Cogan is accepted by the Home School Legal Defence Association for which I hold membership. Much research has been done, and you will find that all of the results are comparable. (Ray, Brian D. Ph.D. 2010 Home-Educated Doing Well at College) It is safe to say, because of the research, college students that have been homeschooled fare much better in college.
However you look at it, public school has its disadvantages and homeschool is no different. There are some disadvantages to homeschooling, but most of them can be managed. Peer interaction is something that is lacking for many homeschoolers, but that is something that can be overcome. My son is involved in many activities that give him the interaction he needs. One such activity is an afterschool martial arts program. He spends at least two hours a day during the week in this program. He learns how to cope with an instructor and the 30 or so other children in this program. My son also plays every sport you can imagine, which gives him more peer interaction. Many public schools now offer homeschool students the opportunity to play school sports. This is crucial for children whom age out of community sports programs. Many do not consider the fact that children do not grow too old to play, the opportunities move into associations such as the Tennessee Secondary School Athletic Association (T.S.S.A.A.) and there is nowhere for them to play. The intrastate sports associations are mostly conducted in public schools. Giving all students access to sports will give the children a better opportunity for college scholarships and much more. Consider football star Tim Tebow as an example. He was homeschooled in high school while playing public school sports. (I am working hard to convince all public schools to make this opportunity available.) Church activities and youth programs give even more opportunities for peer interaction. Homeschool parents can find many opportunities in their community to give their child the interaction they would otherwise miss. Without this interaction from other children and adult instructors their social skills would be severely neglected.
Another disadvantage to homeschool is poor educational leadership. Not all parents are equipped with the knowledge or ability to properly educate their child. Let’s face it, some parents are just plain lazy and refuse to put forth the effort to properly educate their homeschooled child. There is a way around this too, virtual homeschooling. This is a computer or Internet version where the student has a teacher and all their curriculum online or on the computer. This version is a virtual academy, like they are physically in a classroom except it is all online. The teacher and student communicate in real-time and with their curriculum. All the parent has to do is make sure the student is online when they need to be. A disadvantage for many is the cost of homeschooling. Homeschooling can be very expensive, costing as much a $5000 per school year and more. Between tuition, curriculum, material and supplies the cost can add up, but it is well worth it. When you consider the reasons described here, the disadvantages do not outweigh the advantages.
The subject of homeschooling is one that definitely has garnered much attention by those in and out of the educational realm. Many have snapped to negative judgment without considering the facts. While there are disadvantages to both, studies are clear about one thing: students that have been homeschooled have the advantage and that cannot be denied unless facts are disregarded. With the right parental commitment and curriculum, homeschooling is the best educational choice for children today.

Heather Burnes
Heather Burnes
  • Heather Burnes

Can you read? I never said homeschool wasn't adequate, I simply said be an adult, and either quit complaining if you choose to keep your child homeschooled, or put him in public. You can even send him to private if you can afford it. Why are you so obsessed with him playing for this school? Why not see if you can transfer to a different district. Seems you just can't be happy. I guess logic and intelligence escapes you.

Heather Burnes
Heather Burnes
  • Heather Burnes

Also, with all of the stats you just gave it shows you look down on public schools. If you are so dead set against them, then why do you want to use their sports teams so badly? You are cherry picking, and mad that the school system is taking a stand against it. Get over it make a decision. Homeschool and park sports or public or private school and school team sports. Not a difficult concept to grasp.

Heather Burnes
Heather Burnes
  • Heather Burnes

No insecurities, no inferiority, nice try though. This guy only gives 1 argument and that is to read the petition to anyone who disagrees. He is claiming discrimination, and it is not. I just want him to give a good reason why his son can't attend the school and play sports, instead of cherry picking.

Heath Arnold
Heath Arnold
  • Heather Burnes

Sorry if I misunderstood your statements, "be a parent and tell the kid he is going to a real school starting in the fall", as meaning homeschool was not a real school. That is the way it sounds.

This cause is not about the legitamacy of homeschool, I have made my argument. This cause is about a district choosing not to allow my son to participate in what the state says he is allowed. You are correct, my son can attend the school and play sports, instead of "cherry picking". For...

Sorry if I misunderstood your statements, "be a parent and tell the kid he is going to a real school starting in the fall", as meaning homeschool was not a real school. That is the way it sounds.

This cause is not about the legitamacy of homeschool, I have made my argument. This cause is about a district choosing not to allow my son to participate in what the state says he is allowed. You are correct, my son can attend the school and play sports, instead of "cherry picking". For religious and personal reasons we have the right and have chosen to homeschool.

My son has some learnigng disabilites and needs more one on one attention than most schools can provide. For this reason, previously mentioned reasons and more we have made the decision to homeschool.

We love the school and have no issues with it. We are also friends with the superintendant and his family. They are great people. He is honestly the best basketball coach and person I know. My wife played ball for him until she graduated in 2000.

We pay a $1200 yearly fee in order to homeschool our child. Public school would be much cheaper for us, and yes I believe homeschool is superior to public school. That is a fact that has never been proved wrong. (Wtih the exception of a very select few of dead beat parents.)

We are not mad at anyone, only in a disagreement. That is what makes our country great. You don't like it when I repeat the argument stated in the petition, however you missed the part where I made it known that community sport ends after sixth grade here.

Again this petition is about supporting a right that has already been decided. Whether you agree with the state's decision or not is not he issue.

Please keep a postive tone in your replies. I understand your heated argument, but please be positive.

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