Leslie Perry Martin
Leslie Perry Martin

I am a breast cancer survivor and had double mastectomy due to my situation. I think every case should be evaluated and options discussed.

MaryKay Gilbert
MaryKay Gilbert

I had a single mastectomy @ age 49, almost 8 yrs ago (no radiation or chemo as it had not spread into the lymph glands) and my hubby appreciates the fact that I only had 1 removed, but I was done having babies.(BTW~he has NEVER made any negative comments about my appearance to me!) I wouldn't choose to do what she did unless I was done having kids as I think it's very important to breast feed if at all possible. I had trouble nursing on the side that later became cancerous (I had the...

I had a single mastectomy @ age 49, almost 8 yrs ago (no radiation or chemo as it had not spread into the lymph glands) and my hubby appreciates the fact that I only had 1 removed, but I was done having babies.(BTW~he has NEVER made any negative comments about my appearance to me!) I wouldn't choose to do what she did unless I was done having kids as I think it's very important to breast feed if at all possible. I had trouble nursing on the side that later became cancerous (I had the interductal type PLUS a type of skin cancer called Paget's disease of the breast) but still nursed each of my 4 sons at least a year...with the last one I couldn't even nurse on that side as it was so sore (cracked, bleeding at times, frequent mastitis with all my babies). The nipple was inverted and leaked some, but I always thot that was due to a benign cyst removed from that side in my early 20's. SO, be aware of the danger signs, & get your mammograms regularly! I don't bother with the manual tests, as I always had fibrocystic breasts and my cancerous area could not be felt anyway~just looked like a cluster of pinpoints.

Elizabeth Frey
Elizabeth Frey

I believe it is very much a personal decision that requires a vast amount of fact checking. I had invasive breast cancer. My surgeon suggested a lumpectomy with 5 wires guided for the surgery. The breast was almost completely full of DCIS in addition to the invasive tumor. I chose a double mastectomy. That was five years ago. My wounds have healed and my body has healed but there is still residual pain. My nerve endings fire up at the most unfortunate times. I would not change my decision...

I believe it is very much a personal decision that requires a vast amount of fact checking. I had invasive breast cancer. My surgeon suggested a lumpectomy with 5 wires guided for the surgery. The breast was almost completely full of DCIS in addition to the invasive tumor. I chose a double mastectomy. That was five years ago. My wounds have healed and my body has healed but there is still residual pain. My nerve endings fire up at the most unfortunate times. I would not change my decision but the surgery is not as simple as it sounds. Anyone considering it should talk to several people who have had it. They might give you some insight you had not considered.

Gitte Haslund
Gitte Haslund

If a woman has on of the, fortunately rare, gens with high risk for developing breast cancer, I think it is a reasonable option getting both breast removed. In all other situations, it think that our modern advanced prevention is a better solution.

Melanie Melton
Melanie Melton

After working with so many some who have been diagnosed with breast cancer and gone through the hell of surgery, radiation, chemo and the mental trauma of all of it combined, I would say it is upto the individual. They I pray have all the information before making a drastic choice. People think that it is just cutting the breasts off and it is done. They are very wrong. It is a very serious surgery where you are getting not only breast tissue, but muscle as well. There are more aspects then...

After working with so many some who have been diagnosed with breast cancer and gone through the hell of surgery, radiation, chemo and the mental trauma of all of it combined, I would say it is upto the individual. They I pray have all the information before making a drastic choice. People think that it is just cutting the breasts off and it is done. They are very wrong. It is a very serious surgery where you are getting not only breast tissue, but muscle as well. There are more aspects then just cutting. It also doesn't solve all cases of breast cancer. I worked with one lady who did have a double and she still wound up with breast cancer. It is almost impossible to get everything. Please make an informed decision but make it for you

Joyce Rickards
Joyce Rickards

I believe that it is up to the individual. My mom had a partial mastectomy on the right without chemo or radiation in the 70's & 25 years later her breast cancer can back on the same side where there was no breast. She lost her battle, but I believe all possibilities should be explored since medicine & technology is so more advanced now than it was back then. I also know women who are survivors in their 80's with partial mastectomies & they are living & loving life to its fullest each and every day. Pray about it & let God lead you!

Vairamuththu Gnanaguru
Vairamuththu Gnanaguru

I have different opinion.

Jacki Robbins
Jacki Robbins

It's such a personal decision and I certainly don't want an insurance company making it for me. My mother had a lumpectomy, followed by 2 mastectomies over a course of 5 years and then finally succumbed to the disease. My niece had it as well and I followed her 5 years later. When my first spot was found and then my second biopsy, I opted for a complete bilateral mastectomy. I live peacefully knowing that I don't have to go for multiple procedures over the years. No, this is no...

It's such a personal decision and I certainly don't want an insurance company making it for me. My mother had a lumpectomy, followed by 2 mastectomies over a course of 5 years and then finally succumbed to the disease. My niece had it as well and I followed her 5 years later. When my first spot was found and then my second biopsy, I opted for a complete bilateral mastectomy. I live peacefully knowing that I don't have to go for multiple procedures over the years. No, this is no guarantee that it won't come back somewhere else, but for now I can sleep and I can live!

Donna Francis
Donna Francis

It's a decision to be made by the individual facing this (or any condition)..............not the Doctors, the Insurance Co.'s or the Government! We need to take our bodies back from those looking to make a profit.

Heidi Rae
Heidi Rae

I believe it is a personal decision. The individual should be aware that even a double mastectomy does not guarantee they will NOT get breast cancer, as all of the tissue is not removed.

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