Damaris Olmo
Damaris Olmo

I have an aggresive form of Breast Cancer TNBC, I was diagnosed in 2007, went through standard treatment chemo in 2008. In 2009 doctors saw improvements and we skipped radiation and did mastectomy reconstruction. For a year I was in remission. They decided to try radiation. Was in remission after for 6 months the cancer kept coming back in my lymph nodes. I have been using chemotherapies too many. There is no cure for my cancer, regardless of all the advanced that they talk about. We turn...

I have an aggresive form of Breast Cancer TNBC, I was diagnosed in 2007, went through standard treatment chemo in 2008. In 2009 doctors saw improvements and we skipped radiation and did mastectomy reconstruction. For a year I was in remission. They decided to try radiation. Was in remission after for 6 months the cancer kept coming back in my lymph nodes. I have been using chemotherapies too many. There is no cure for my cancer, regardless of all the advanced that they talk about. We turn into a lab rat when it comes to this disease. You need to speak with the real women that are going through this agony everyday!! Cancer is REAL.! I have the same cancer that Robin Roberts has no cure just control of the disease and a lot of cash and luck you need to be able to afford the cost of the treatments. I'm here today fighting since 2007 I guess Lucky! WE NEED A CURE, less talking about with the new advances. Where are they?? Where is the cure? The researchs?? More women dying! Enough!!

Kathi Hartwell-Remp
Kathi Hartwell-Remp

I had a preventive mastectomy and it is the best thing I ever did. My mother got breast cancer when I was about 18 months and she died when i was 19. I have lived knowing I was high risk all my life and my cells were changing and it was very stressful. I wanted to be able to raise my kids and for them not to worry about losing me.

Sherry Morgan Fritz
Sherry Morgan Fritz

The research and statistics I am learning from the health education events I attend are only attributing 2 to 3% at most to genetics. The doctors are teaching us about epigenetics where genes can be triggered to turn on or off by diet and lifestyle. I think this is madness to have such severe operations! AND, if we do not address diet and lifestyle, then instead of breast cancer, you will most likely get another disease, heart, or cancer somewhere else in the body. It is like adding more...

The research and statistics I am learning from the health education events I attend are only attributing 2 to 3% at most to genetics. The doctors are teaching us about epigenetics where genes can be triggered to turn on or off by diet and lifestyle. I think this is madness to have such severe operations! AND, if we do not address diet and lifestyle, then instead of breast cancer, you will most likely get another disease, heart, or cancer somewhere else in the body. It is like adding more ambulances, hospitals, drugs at the bottom of a cliff! When a fence at the top might be a better place to look!

Ira Fedder
Ira Fedder
  • Sherry Morgan Fritz

The FDA is failing, and dangerous products are getting into our food and cosmetics. Glycol propylene is common chemical in many deodorants, and it allows chemicals to pass through your skin through your pores. The chemical "fragrance" found in many deodorants has is unregulated and could be made of all kinds of noxious chemicals.

Kathy Nelson
Kathy Nelson
  • Sherry Morgan Fritz

Your right about diet and lifestyle. I have 3 sisters, and had 2 brothers. The oldest drank himself to death. I`m the only one that did not ever smoke, drink, do drugs, took care of myself and for the most part watched what I ate and wasn`t and isn`t overweight, etc. etc.,I can go on. But I`m the one who ended up with breast cancer. What another person thinks bears absolutely no weight in another person`s decision when it is literally a life and death decision. Its not madness when it is...

Your right about diet and lifestyle. I have 3 sisters, and had 2 brothers. The oldest drank himself to death. I`m the only one that did not ever smoke, drink, do drugs, took care of myself and for the most part watched what I ate and wasn`t and isn`t overweight, etc. etc.,I can go on. But I`m the one who ended up with breast cancer. What another person thinks bears absolutely no weight in another person`s decision when it is literally a life and death decision. Its not madness when it is you on the line-hope you never have to see or experience how Mrs. Jolie feels or how I felt.

Darin Peters
Darin Peters

As with other people posting, the answers can't be so straight forward. Surely it can only be answered by the women concerned based on advice and options given by their specialists?

Deanna Clarke
Deanna Clarke
  • Darin Peters

Correct :)

Gina Smith
Gina Smith

I think that having both removed is extreme. I think that should be done only if the chances of it spreading to the other breast is high, and just becasue it runs in the family I think its extreme to have them removed without the diagnosis but everyone is entitled to do what they think is necessary for themselves.

Gina Cote
Gina Cote
  • Gina Smith

The diagnosis would be a positive gene

Carla DeFrance Crosby
Carla DeFrance Crosby
  • Gina Smith

Many women feel lopsided with only one breast. They don't feel balanced

Karen Grosheim
Karen Grosheim

My best friend had a bilateral mastectomy. She was eight years out when she found a lump. She went to the doctor and found she had stgre 4 breast cancer. She died within a year. I would not put myself through it knowing you can still get breast cancer even without breasts. I have had breast cancer and am seven years out. Should I have a reoccurance, I am not sure what I would do besides talk to a lot of experts. Just don't do something you will be sorry for later.

Gina Cote
Gina Cote
  • Karen Grosheim

I have no regrets for having a mastectomy. Only peace of mind

Iris Walls
Iris Walls
  • Karen Grosheim

Me too Gina - good luck!

Ellen Richards
Ellen Richards

I wish I had gone for a double mastectomy, it would go e peace of mind instead of the thought of the cancer returning being at the back of your mind

Victoria Hayward
Victoria Hayward
  • Ellen Richards

THIS i also truly understand

Vicki Norris-Karten
Vicki Norris-Karten
  • Ellen Richards

Totally agree. I had a mastectomy in 2003 and so regret not having a double. My annual mammo is in 2 days and I am a nervous wreck. Huge regret on my part.

MaryKay Gilbert
MaryKay Gilbert
  • Ellen Richards

How advanced was your cancer? Mine hadn't spread, and no sign of it in the other side. I had an implant and a lift on the remaining one, and am uneven, but just wear loose clothes...can't bear to wear anything tight anyway! I've survived almost 8 yrs with no occurrence. God bless and give you His peace!

Celeste Aurorean
Celeste Aurorean
  • Ellen Richards

Thank you for that Ellen. I'm going in for a double on Tuesday and its been a very hard decision. Peace of Mind is what I'm going for. <3

Tracy Bayliss
Tracy Bayliss

I think the final decision should be left with the patient and they are the only people that have to live with the consequences of the decision

Lucie Mayer
Lucie Mayer
  • Tracy Bayliss

Yes, but what if the doctor isn't telling you the whole truth? Did you know, for example, that 98% of oncologists would NEVER use chemo for themselves? How much is your doctor influenced by Big Pharma? Vitamin B.17, which has been proved ti cure cancer, is unavailable in pharmacies. If you are lucky enough to find organic apricots, you can eat the pit, not more than 3 a day, and do away with cancer. A bag of pits costs around $12 and will last a month. Chemo for a month is, what, $5000? Try...

Yes, but what if the doctor isn't telling you the whole truth? Did you know, for example, that 98% of oncologists would NEVER use chemo for themselves? How much is your doctor influenced by Big Pharma? Vitamin B.17, which has been proved ti cure cancer, is unavailable in pharmacies. If you are lucky enough to find organic apricots, you can eat the pit, not more than 3 a day, and do away with cancer. A bag of pits costs around $12 and will last a month. Chemo for a month is, what, $5000? Try telling me that Big Pharma would be ok with people curing their ails with a $12 monthly fee...

Lidia Martins
Lidia Martins
  • Tracy Bayliss

Is this true we tried them for my mother and it did not cure her.

Barbara B Moore
Barbara B Moore
  • Tracy Bayliss

I totally agree with Tracy. It's your body and your life. I have chosen the same.

Kathy Earsman
Kathy Earsman
  • Tracy Bayliss

What if you're not getting the whole truth, Lucie? Laetril was a scam. In Australia we do not pay for chemo, and having worked alongside Oncologists I know how much they care about each person in their care. It's insulting to suggest that they don't have integrity,

David Emerson
David Emerson

A genetic predisposition toward any cancer is only predisposition. Studies have shown that genetic expression can be altered. Studies also show that a variety of foods, supplements and lifestyle choices effect how genes express themselves.

http://peoplebeatingcancer.org/search/node/genetic%20expression

http://peoplebeatingcancer.org/search/node/breast%20cancer%20curcumin

David Emerson

Melissa Pak
Melissa Pak
  • David Emerson

Thanks for sharing, David! I agree. There are other, less drastic preventative measure that can be taken.

Bill Fleming
Bill Fleming
  • David Emerson

You are correct. Anyone carrying the gene that is the precursor to breast cancer is not guaranteed to get it. It requires a stressor to for the cancer. For example, estrogen based birth control. Estrogen, induced beyond natural levels, will enable the cancer if exposed to it for a prolonged period of time. If someone is predisposed they need to be aware of the stressors and avoid them. There are countless women predisposed to breast cancer that will never have to deal with the horror of the disease because they are not applying the stressors.

Kitty Plourde
Kitty Plourde
  • David Emerson

Would you all be willing to take that risk??

Isabel Brooks
Isabel Brooks
  • David Emerson

there are less drastic measures its true. but when you are the one with it growing in side you... you dont care about what you look like, you just want to LIVE to see tomorrow!

Sharon Spencer
Sharon Spencer

This is definitely a personal choice, but just thinking out loud for a moment, and forgive me if this sounds stupid, but how effective is this as a preventative measure? Does removing both breasts actually eliminate the risk of developing breast cancer? Is it possible to remove 100% of all breast tissue cells? Does your propensity to developing breast cancer not mean that there is still a risk...?

Paula Rank Torp
Paula Rank Torp
  • Sharon Spencer

removing both breast decreases some womens chance of developing breast cancer by for 85-90%. There is still a very small chance of developing breast cancer due to the small amount of tissue behind the nipples (unless you also have the nipples removed). Less tissue, less invasive cancer!!! If you are told you have a 80%+ chance of developing breast cancer...are you willing to sit around and wait for the diagnosis or would you take your doctors advice and opt for the surgery that could save your life? I applaud Angelina for her bravery!

Sharon Spencer
Sharon Spencer
  • Sharon Spencer

Thanks Paula, I couldn't agree more, definitely preferable to Cancer! Your response suggests you interpreted my comments as derogatory towards Angelina's actions, but I just wan't clear on the actual benefits of such a procedure. As someone with a family medical history spanning breast, cervical, liver and lung Cancer, not to mention the list of other hereditary conditions my genes give me a higher risk of contracting, I fully appreciate it's a very personal decision that I wouldn't wish on...

Thanks Paula, I couldn't agree more, definitely preferable to Cancer! Your response suggests you interpreted my comments as derogatory towards Angelina's actions, but I just wan't clear on the actual benefits of such a procedure. As someone with a family medical history spanning breast, cervical, liver and lung Cancer, not to mention the list of other hereditary conditions my genes give me a higher risk of contracting, I fully appreciate it's a very personal decision that I wouldn't wish on anybody, and I'm sure not a decision that Angelina or anyone in her position comes to lightly. WebMD have published an interesting article on Breast Cancer and Preventive Mastectomy if anyone is interested in reading more - http://www.webmd.com/breast-cancer/guide/preventive-mastectomy

Amy H Fox
Amy H Fox
  • Sharon Spencer

I had a needle biopsy done in Oct. 2006 after it came back with cancer cells the Dr. told me my options. He said it hasn't spread we caught it early! Of the options I was given I chose the bilateral mastectomy to catch it from spreading! Taking all my breast tissue kept me alive as I am 6 years breast cancer free!
I see post about everyone making a big deal out of the reconstructive surgery. It's part of the bilateral mastectomy, just done a few months later. It's very painful, the drain...

I had a needle biopsy done in Oct. 2006 after it came back with cancer cells the Dr. told me my options. He said it hasn't spread we caught it early! Of the options I was given I chose the bilateral mastectomy to catch it from spreading! Taking all my breast tissue kept me alive as I am 6 years breast cancer free!
I see post about everyone making a big deal out of the reconstructive surgery. It's part of the bilateral mastectomy, just done a few months later. It's very painful, the drain tubes hurt really bad. She would not have gone thru this surgery for publicity purposes.

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