Diane Cain Smith
Diane Cain Smith

The risk of developing breast cancer can be greatly reduced by testing Vitamin D levels and supplementing if necessary to raise levels up to 50 ng/mL (125 nmol/L) and having a healthy diet low in sugar, processed food and additives. http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2011/10/22/carole-baggerly-on-vitamin-d.aspx

Daleen Fisher
Daleen Fisher

Every person is unique- and their cancer is unique, and their body is unique. I can understand the women (and men) who watched close relatives fight cancer, who are facing cancer and the fight it involves, who then decide living with the fear of it is not worth it. I know women who opted to have an entire breast removed, rather than risk it and only have lumpectomy and chemo and/or radiation. I think each woman (man) has to make such decisions based on what she/he feels she/he must do...

Every person is unique- and their cancer is unique, and their body is unique. I can understand the women (and men) who watched close relatives fight cancer, who are facing cancer and the fight it involves, who then decide living with the fear of it is not worth it. I know women who opted to have an entire breast removed, rather than risk it and only have lumpectomy and chemo and/or radiation. I think each woman (man) has to make such decisions based on what she/he feels she/he must do depending on how high her/his fear level is, what her/his gut tells her/him, her/his own priorities, her/his age and life stage, and what her/his various doctors and research tell her/him. Ultimately, if a woman feels she made the right decision for herself, then it IS the right decision for her. The same goes for men facing such decisions, or ones close to it.

Colin Rixon
Colin Rixon

Reading Andrew Balls comment those of us not at risk should think again. A percentage of figurers for those acquiring breast cancer through the defective gene are actually men and percentage of deaths higher as it goes undiagnosed, the best thing all can do, is push your respective governments to fund more research and find a cure or prevention for all cancers , some things have huge effects like giving up smoking or banning substances like asbestos, or keeping additives out of animal feed and the food chain.

Lorraine Berton
Lorraine Berton

Not a

You can only answer this one, if you are ever faced with the situation. The best person to advise you is your specialists, as not every case is the same.

Debs Armishaw
Debs Armishaw

I have had a double mastectomy after being diagnosed with Breast Cancer and after my Mother had Breast Cancer at approx the same age. I personally believe that this chioce won't suit everybody and it should be decided on a case by case basis after all the facts and alternatives have been considered and then the person concerned can make an informed decision.

Melinda Woods
Melinda Woods

I have cancer and that not true just make sure u got the right dr

Liz Thomas
Liz Thomas

It is completely up to the individual! Please people don't forget, MEN are diagnosed everyday too with breast cancer

Aruna Pego
Aruna Pego

Taking both breast off only because there is a history of breast cancer is a blind decision, a decision out of fear. Genetics are just a small part. How you eat, your whole lifestyle (diet, sport, stess or stressfree,, happy, unhappy) if you have children and breastfeed them for a long time are so much more factors!

Rose Marie Masiello Sirianni

Removing both breasts is not the answer to not getting breast cancer. You can still get breast cancer even if you have a double mastectomy. Preventive checkups if the best way to deal with this decision.

Michael Eliel
Michael Eliel

I believe that a woman must do what she feel she must do. People do different things for different reasons and sometimes while it may seem crazy to me it's the right decision for them. They just need to know they have my love and support.

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