About

The Coalition works to prevent the recruitment and use of children as soldiers, to secure their demobilisation and to ensure their rehabilitation and reintegration into society.

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PLEASE MAKE ALL DONATIONS HERE:
http://www.child-soldiers.org/contact/donate
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About:

The Coalition to Stop the Use of Child Soldiers was formed in May 1998 by leading international human rights and humanitarian organizations. It has regional and national networks in Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America and the Middle East. The International Coalition has its headquarters in London.

The Coalition's International Steering Committee member organizations are: Amnesty International, Defence for Children International, Human Rights Watch, International Federation Terre des Hommes, International Save the Children Alliance, Jesuit Refugee Service, and the Quaker United Nations Office-Geneva. It maintains active links with UNICEF, the International Committee of the Red Cross, and the International labour Organization.

Over the last nine years the International Coalition has worked in collaboration with partner organizations to establish national coalitions in many regions of the world.

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Contact the Coalition to stop the use of Child Soldiers:

Coalition to Stop the Use of Child Soldiers
International Secretariat
4th Floor
9 Marshalsea Road
London SE1 1EP
United Kingdom

Tel: +44 (0)20 7367 4110
Fax: +44 (0)20 7367 4129

info@child-soldiers.org

http://www.child-soldiers.org

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1. The problem is most critical in Africa, where up to 100,000 children, some as young as nine, were estimated to be involved in armed conflict in mid 2004. Children are also used as soldiers in various Asian countries and in parts of Latin America, Europe a

2. The majority of the world's child soldiers are involved in a variety of armed political groups. These include government-backed paramilitary groups, militias and self-defence units operating in many conflict zones. Others include armed groups opposed to c

3. Most child soldiers are aged between 14 and 18, While many enlist "voluntarily" research shows that such adolescents see few alternatives to involvement in armed conflict. Some enlist as a means of survival in war-torn regions after family, social and eco

4. Demobilization, disarmament and reintegration (DDR) programs specifically aimed at child soldiers have been established in many countries, both during and after armed conflict and have assisted former child soldiers to acquire new skills and return to the