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Should employers be required to grant male employees unpaid paternity leave after the birth of their

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  • Yes (73% people answered this)
  • No (12% people answered this)
  • It should be at the employer's discretion (14% people answered this)

8459 people voted.

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The extent to which fathers can be around – especially in the early years of their childrens’ lives – often depends upon their busy work schedules. Unlike the United Kingdom – where dads have a legal right to take up to six months of paid paternity leave while their children's mothers return to work – the U.S. doesn't even require employers to give new fathers a single day of unpaid paternity leave. Under the 1993 Family and Medical Leave Act, most employees who work at companies with more than 50 employees are guaranteed 12 weeks unpaid leave for the birth or adoption of a new child. However, the U.S is among the world’s countries that does not grant paid paternity leave for recently-made dads. The lack of a comprehensive policy puts an additional strain on households where dads are playing the primary care-giving role. As a result, only 22% of American employees who are eligible under the Family and Medical Leave Act actually take paternal leave because most aren’t able to afford the loss of income. Check out this infographic comparing paternity leave around the world: http://awesome.good.is/transparency/web/1206/papa-don-t-leave/flash.html What do you think? Should employers be required to grant male employees unpaid paternity leave after the birth of their child? Answer the poll and sound off in the comment section below.

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