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Visual pollution in wildlife research...is it always needed?

Vf

INTRUSIVE WILDLIFE FIELD METHODOLOGY ("VISUAL POLLUTANTS") ARE NOT ALWAYS NEEDED FOR OBJECTIVE INDIVIDUAL RECOGNITION:

The uniquely identifiable hair pattern on the dominant male Shongololo from The Tsebokolodi Yellow Mongoose group.

The hair patterns on the dorsal and ventral side of the Yellow Mongoose tails make them uniquely and objectively identifiable for 100% accurate individual identification for research data collection I have documented.

Meerkats all have uniquely identifiable back patterns.

This illustrates that wild Meerkat and Mongoose research can be done without the need to use intrusive artificial marking methodology which is a common field research practice in wildlife observation such as docking - (cutting off body parts like ears and digits), nocking, tagging, tattooing, clipping, dying, hair cutting, hole punching and many more.

These techniques often leave permanent "visual pollutants" on wildlife in my opinion and alternative techniques should be investigated whenever possible such as uniquely identifying features that exist.

Ethical considerations such as this are of high interest to me with regards to wildlife field research methodology.

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