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Grant Lebanese women the right to pass on their nationalities to their non-national husbands and children.

If an Arab woman marries a foreign national she is not entitled to pass her nationality to her spouse and children.

The inability to extend her nationality not only denies a woman her full rights as a national, but also denies her children their basic rights as human beings.

This exclusion may deny children basic rights to health care and education, or to marriage or travel. Furthermore, children excluded from nationality rights can be denied residence and deported, thus breaking families apart.

Moreover, nationality codes in the MENA countries violate the spirit and letter of all international conventions relating to the issue of women and nationality, these include, but are not limited to, The Universal Declaration of Human Rights, The Convention on the Elimination of all Forms of Discrimination Against Women, The Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) and The International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR).

"My Nationality is a Right for Me and My Family" campaign (Jinsiyati 7ak li wa li Osrati) tries to put women's-basic-right-to-nationality under the spot light; Its major goal is to amend the nationality code in Lebanon as well as in other Arab countries.

Nationality Campaign is active in six Arab countries, three of which (Algeria, Egypt, and Morocco) have amended their nationality laws, granting women their citizenship rights;

On the other hand, Lebanon, Syria and Bahrain are still campaigning to amend the law, and to raise public awareness about this legal discrimination;

1. Women's right to nationality is upheld in international law through the Universal Declaration of Human Rights

2. Women's right to nationality is upheld in international law through the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CE

3. Women's right to nationality is upheld in international law through the Convention on the Rights of the Child (1989)