Back to Save the US Constitution

Virginia takes the Con Con Stage

By Chuck Baldwin
January 13, 2009
NewsWithViews.com

As I noted in this column a few weeks ago, proponents of assembling a new Constitutional Convention are a scant two states away from achieving that monstrous reality. (Please review my column on this subject)

At that time, the state of Ohio was in the crosshairs. Fortunately, enough people from that good state inundated their state representatives with objections, and the matter was tabled (for how long, no one knows). Now it appears that the Commonwealth of Virginia is going to be the next battleground state.

In all likelihood, the Virginia legislature will be the next state government to take up the Con Con issue. It is imperative, therefore, that the citizens of Virginia begin contacting their various representatives, demanding that they not authorize the call for a new Constitutional Convention.

As I noted in my previous column on this subject, "If called, a modern Constitutional Convention could declare the U.S. Constitution to be null and void, and could completely rewrite the document. For example, former U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice Warren Burger once declared, 'There is no effective way to limit or muzzle the actions of a Constitutional Convention. The Convention could make its own rules and set its own agenda.'"

Since 32 states have already approved the new Con Con, only 2 more states are required for the enactment of this debacle.

For clarification, Virginia already passed a Con Con resolution, but in 2004 rescinded that resolution. Therefore, the debate this year will be whether to reverse the bill to rescind. Simply put, the state legislature in Virginia may again take up the matter of issuing their call for a Constitutional Convention very soon, and citizens in that good state need to rally against it now!

To give readers a simple tally, the following states have never voted to ratify a new Constitutional Convention: California, Connecticut, Hawaii, Illinois, Kentucky, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Rhode Island, Vermont, Washington, West Virginia, and Wisconsin.

These states voted for a new Constitutional Convention but later rescinded their resolutions: Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, Idaho, Utah, North Dakota, Arizona, Virginia, South Carolina, and Georgia.

If you do not see your state listed above, it means your state indeed voted to call for a new Constitutional Convention and has not rescinded its vote. I strongly suggest that citizens of these states demand that their legislatures rescind their previous votes calling for a new Con Con. Start now!

Of course, the problem is, it is not clear whether the court will allow states to rescind their votes after having passed a Con Con resolution. Article. V. of the U.S. Constitution is vague on the subject, and there is no case law precedent on the matter. As far as I'm concerned, however, the Tenth Amendment settles the issue, and states should be regarded as fully qualified under the Constitution to determine their own fate in the matter. Since there is nothing in the Constitution prohibiting rescission, states are duly authorized to rescind their votes, as they please. But I don't expect the powers that be in Washington, D.C., to see it that way. Does anyone remember that little skirmish known as the Civil War? This, in essence, was the same view of the Confederate States: they voted to rescind their decisions to join the Union. The tyrant, Abraham Lincoln, determined that states have no such sovereignty (thus nullifying the Tenth Amendment, among several others) and sent the entire federal army to force the southern states back into the union. If history is any teacher, therefore, no state will be allowed to rescind their votes, and we are only two states away from a new Constitutional Convention being assembled.

There is no question in my mind that, should a new Constitutional Convention be called, it would be the end of the United States of America as we know it, and our current Constitution and Bill of Rights would...

to comment