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senate Bill S. 987

Should the Federal Gov’t Develop a Strategy to Address Economic & Security Challenges Posed by China?

Argument in favor

China’s multifaceted challenge to the U.S. — in the security, economic and political spheres — requires a government-wide response. This bill would facilitate this process and ensure that the U.S. government is prepared to address the numerous challenges that China poses to its interests both at home and abroad.

jimK's Opinion
···
09/28/2019
Yes we need a strategic approach to China. China has a long term strategy for dealing with us and they have stuck with their basic plan for over 40 years. They have publicly shared their overall goals and we just watched and moved on. About 40 years ago, I spent nearly a month in China as part of State Department team to assess potential cooperative technology programs- near the end of what was Nixon’s ping-pong diplomacy. We were guests of the Chinese government and had ample opportunity to speak with the lower level communist party members that took us from site to site. They talked freely about moving China into manufacturing and high tech as long term goals. They were sponsoring entrepreneurship to bring the drive and focus of pure capitalism into their culture. They never wavered from those goals and to meet those goals, they have in many ways exploited vulnerabilities of our open society and the our governments lack of long term vision as our country was preoccupied by continual military interventions and undeclared wars. While we were policing or fighting wars around the world, China did not- and used their resources to meet their strategic priorities. They now are a major manufacturer of key high tech electronics equipment. China now manufactures something like 80% of the world’s prescription drugs as well. China secured long term mining rights to 90% of rare earth materials- critical for modern consumer and military electronics. All of this happened quietly and consistently as we and the rest of the world just watched. China actively demanded and obtained manufacturing and tech secrets as part of the agreements needed to access its large manufacturing base; and have used similar techniques in sending students (married couples can only send one partner) to actively support and acquire new tech from our universities. China has limited access to its large internal markets, built what they call the Great Fire Wall to shield it’s electronic infrastructure and have negotiated unbalanced trade agreements using its large and growing economic clout. China has also became very sophisticated in cyber-espionage, greatly exploiting our open society using multiple attack vectors employing software and firmware intrusions as well as selling us hardware hacked equipment capable of tapping network traffic with no software ‘signature’. They successfully stole fairly complete and detailed plans for F-35, F-22 fighters and a whopping 65 gigabytes in design data for the C-17 using a combination of covert and cyber intrusions. They are leading the world in several new technologies- for example having demonstrated quantum entanglement between earth stations and orbital hardware- which should allow unbreakably encoded communication around the world; while our Navy is using helicopters to drop bean-bags with messages onto the decks of fleet ships for highly secured ship to ship communication. Our cyber warriors have watched and thwarted Chinese probing of our networks and infrastructure but have never had any top level guidance by our leadership nor diplomatic channels for responding without risking going from what is a ‘silent’ war to a shooting war.... .... there is a lot more, but that’s enough for now. ... Clearly we need long term strategic goals that cannot be whimsically changed with each new Congress and each new administration. We need to have long term steady commitments to attain long term goals. There needs to be a much greater emphasis on diplomatic, technological, and economic strategic goals and coordinated multi-faceted tactics to attain those goals. While trump is right that our trade with China is unbalanced, the solution is not brinksmanship diplomacy; the solution is not in ‘winning the deal’- the solution is a found in well planned, integrated and consistent plan that uses all of our resources effectively and creatively to win the future. Again, winning the deal by any means possible is way less important than winning the future with respectful give and take, fair and equitable win-win solutions, and continual diplomacy to resolve issues. Well planned long term locked-down strategies are clearly needed for achieving long term equity with China and in many other aspects, such as dealing with climate change, of our long term future in the finite world of which we are part.... .... ... in reading some comments; please stop with the “us versus them” bull crap. It’s about our working relations with world powers, which China has certainly become, which are fair and equitable- we need strategies that are mutually beneficial and fairly balanced.
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Gopin2020's Opinion
···
09/28/2019
Yes we should and President Trump is already doing that, you have been fixated on Trump Derangement Syndrome since 2015 and I don’t expect this to change. So no Thank you Senator Coons I’ll let Trump handle it he’s been 10 for 10 so far. #MAGA
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09/28/2019
Yes. Support Chris Coons’ bill. We need a co ordinated position across trade, tech, finance, diplomacy, intelligence, security...when it come to China. Actually we need this for all of our relationships with other nations. But especially right now, we really need this for interactions with China.
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Argument opposed

The U.S. is already beginning to embrace a whole-of-government approach to addressing the challenge posed by China without this bill. Additionally, ratcheting up the government-wide effort to counter Chinese influence will certainly derail already-tense negotiations to end the trade war between the two countries, which could worsen if negotiations fail.

Robert's Opinion
···
09/28/2019
Why don’t we have a plan to deal with a wide variety of economic threats from a variety of countries and causes
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NoHedges's Opinion
···
10/01/2019
Probably best to wait until we HAVE a Federal government who works in the best interests of the entire country and not attempt to split the cognitive resources currently focused on impeachment. U.N. needs to look into how many other foreign heads Trump has solicited favors from. If our people do it it win become a governmental equivalent of Dr. Seuss’ Better Butter Battle ———- The battle lines are drawn and the fight gets real. There's a think tank working its way furiously to trump the enemy. Yooks and Zooks and their different styles of applying butter on the bread.
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Ellen's Opinion
···
09/28/2019
No. We already have government organizations that monitor trade with all other countries. What we need to do is get rid of #45 so the government can run smoothly
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What is Senate Bill S. 987?

This bill — the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Act of 2019 — would seek to reduce the U.S. government’s reliance on Chinese supply chains and push back on China’s unfair trade practices by implementing many recommendations made by the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission. In total, this bill would require more than 10 government agencies to work together to create a whole-of-government approach to address Chinese challenges to the U.S. in both the economic and security spheres.

Specifically, this bill would require: 

  • An assessment of and report on the federal supply chain’s potential vulnerabilities to Chinese threats, to be carried out by the administration;
  • The U.S. Trade Representative to assess whether it’s in the U.S.’ national interest to bring a complaint against China at the World Trade Organization (WTO) in coordination with U.S. allies and partners;
  • The Dept. of Justice (DOJ) to determine whether members of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) are intimidating U.S. residents and ensure that Chinese government publications distributed in the U.S. are clearly labeled as such;
  • The Director of National Intelligence (DNI) to report on the effects (on freedom of navigation, sea control, and U.S. interests) of China’s existing and potential facilities along the Silk Road Economic Belt and the New Maritime Silk Road;
  • The National Counterintelligence and Security Center to report on the CCP’s influence and propaganda activities in the U.S.;
  • The Depts. Of Defense (DOD) and Homeland Security (DHS) to assess the implications of changes in the Chinese Coast Guard’s command structure;
  • The Dept. of Commerce and Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to indentify the steps required to roll out a secure 5G wireless network;
  • The Comptroller General to assess potential risks involved in U.S.-China technical cooperation;
  • The Treasury Dept. to report on China’s enforcement of UN sanctions on North Korea; and
  • The Office of the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) to report on China’s trade-distorting practices and what it’s doing to counteract Chinese policies’ anticompetitive impact.

Impact

Treasury Dept.; WTO; DOJ; CPP; DOD; DHS; Commerce Dept.; FCC; Comptroller General; DNI; USTR; China; U.S.-China relations; Chinese Coast Guard; Silk Road Economic Belt; and the New Maritime Silk Road.

Cost of Senate Bill S. 987

A CBO cost estimate is unavailable.

More Information

In-DepthSen. Chris Coons (D-DE) introduced this bill to answer China’s security, economic and political challenges to the U.S by harnessing at least ten government agencies’ resources to help counter China’s multifaceted challenge to the United States

“From its unfair trade practices to its rapid military expansion, China now presents security, economic, and political challenges to the United States unlike any we’ve faced before. China is acting swiftly and aggressively to expand its power and influence around the globe, and Congress must do its part to ensure the United States is positioned to work with China where we can, but also, push back where we must.”

Original Senate cosponsor Sen. Tim Kaine (D-VA) contends that while the U.S. should cooperate with China on global issues, that position isn’t incongruous with defending U.S. interests against Chinese encroachment

“For too long, the United States has failed to address the challenge that China poses to our economy, our allies in East Asia, and to international norms on human rights and civil liberties. It is now clear that a new approach is needed, and this bill will begin to lay the foundation for a reassessment of the U.S.-China relationship. Although I believe we should cooperate with China to resolve pressing global issues, we cannot shy away from defending U.S. interests and the international system that has brought peace and prosperity to the Pacific region.”

Original Senate cosponsor Sen. Mitt Romney (R-UT) adds

“We must develop a comprehensive strategy to confront the unprecedented challenge that the Chinese government poses to U.S. national security, U.S. intellectual property, and U.S. businesses. By putting into place the recommendations of the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission, this bill takes a step in the right direction and puts safeguards in place to confront the critical threat China poses.”

House sponsor Rep. Brad Sherman (D-CA), Chairman of the House Foreign Affairs Subcommittee on Asia, says:

“For too long China has been stealing U.S. technology and jobs with impunity and it is increasingly trying to influence public opinion in the United States. The U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Act of 2019 would create a whole-of-government approach to counter China’s whole-of-society challenge.”

Original House cosponsor Rep. Mike Gallagher (R-WI) adds that this bill is needed to counter China’s influence:

“The United States faces no greater economic, political, and security threat than China. We must act with a sense of urgency to address the malign activities of the Chinese Communist Party and implementing the important recommendations of the U.S.-China Economic and Security Commission would serve as an important step in doing so.”

Critics of a hardline approach to U.S.-China relations argue that it endangers stable relations and contend that there are numerous benefits to continued engagement and cooperation with China. They also point out that the costs of dealing with Chinese retaliation to hardline U.S. policies could be high, as the two countries’ economies are tightly intertwined and Asian partners and allies also have consumers, businesses, and stockholders that’d be negatively affected by a deterioration in U.S.-China relations.

This legislation has two bipartisan Senate cosponsors (one from each party). Its House companion, sponsored by Rep. Brad Sherman (D-CA), has five bipartisan House cosponsors, including three Democrats and two Republicans. As of August 27, 2019, neither bill had received a committee vote.


Of NoteIn its 2018 annual report to Congress, the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission made 26 recommendations to Congress, 10 of which it deemed to be “of particular significance.” The Commission’s 10 key recommendations are all included in this bill.

The U.S. began embracing a whole-of-government strategy to address the challenges posed by China beginning in late summer 2018. Congress led the push via legislation, hearings and statements targeting Chinese practices; the Trump administration used tariffs to also punish China; and administration officials turned up the rhetorical heat on China in public statements, interviews and editorials.


Media:

Summary by Lorelei Yang

(Photo Credit: iStockphoto.com / narvikk)

AKA

U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Act of 2019

Official Title

A bill to implement the recommendations of the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission, and for other purposes.

bill Progress


  • Not enacted
    The President has not signed this bill
  • The house has not voted
  • The senate has not voted
      senate Committees
      Committee on Foreign Relations
    IntroducedApril 2nd, 2019
    Yes we need a strategic approach to China. China has a long term strategy for dealing with us and they have stuck with their basic plan for over 40 years. They have publicly shared their overall goals and we just watched and moved on. About 40 years ago, I spent nearly a month in China as part of State Department team to assess potential cooperative technology programs- near the end of what was Nixon’s ping-pong diplomacy. We were guests of the Chinese government and had ample opportunity to speak with the lower level communist party members that took us from site to site. They talked freely about moving China into manufacturing and high tech as long term goals. They were sponsoring entrepreneurship to bring the drive and focus of pure capitalism into their culture. They never wavered from those goals and to meet those goals, they have in many ways exploited vulnerabilities of our open society and the our governments lack of long term vision as our country was preoccupied by continual military interventions and undeclared wars. While we were policing or fighting wars around the world, China did not- and used their resources to meet their strategic priorities. They now are a major manufacturer of key high tech electronics equipment. China now manufactures something like 80% of the world’s prescription drugs as well. China secured long term mining rights to 90% of rare earth materials- critical for modern consumer and military electronics. All of this happened quietly and consistently as we and the rest of the world just watched. China actively demanded and obtained manufacturing and tech secrets as part of the agreements needed to access its large manufacturing base; and have used similar techniques in sending students (married couples can only send one partner) to actively support and acquire new tech from our universities. China has limited access to its large internal markets, built what they call the Great Fire Wall to shield it’s electronic infrastructure and have negotiated unbalanced trade agreements using its large and growing economic clout. China has also became very sophisticated in cyber-espionage, greatly exploiting our open society using multiple attack vectors employing software and firmware intrusions as well as selling us hardware hacked equipment capable of tapping network traffic with no software ‘signature’. They successfully stole fairly complete and detailed plans for F-35, F-22 fighters and a whopping 65 gigabytes in design data for the C-17 using a combination of covert and cyber intrusions. They are leading the world in several new technologies- for example having demonstrated quantum entanglement between earth stations and orbital hardware- which should allow unbreakably encoded communication around the world; while our Navy is using helicopters to drop bean-bags with messages onto the decks of fleet ships for highly secured ship to ship communication. Our cyber warriors have watched and thwarted Chinese probing of our networks and infrastructure but have never had any top level guidance by our leadership nor diplomatic channels for responding without risking going from what is a ‘silent’ war to a shooting war.... .... there is a lot more, but that’s enough for now. ... Clearly we need long term strategic goals that cannot be whimsically changed with each new Congress and each new administration. We need to have long term steady commitments to attain long term goals. There needs to be a much greater emphasis on diplomatic, technological, and economic strategic goals and coordinated multi-faceted tactics to attain those goals. While trump is right that our trade with China is unbalanced, the solution is not brinksmanship diplomacy; the solution is not in ‘winning the deal’- the solution is a found in well planned, integrated and consistent plan that uses all of our resources effectively and creatively to win the future. Again, winning the deal by any means possible is way less important than winning the future with respectful give and take, fair and equitable win-win solutions, and continual diplomacy to resolve issues. Well planned long term locked-down strategies are clearly needed for achieving long term equity with China and in many other aspects, such as dealing with climate change, of our long term future in the finite world of which we are part.... .... ... in reading some comments; please stop with the “us versus them” bull crap. It’s about our working relations with world powers, which China has certainly become, which are fair and equitable- we need strategies that are mutually beneficial and fairly balanced.
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    Why don’t we have a plan to deal with a wide variety of economic threats from a variety of countries and causes
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    Yes we should and President Trump is already doing that, you have been fixated on Trump Derangement Syndrome since 2015 and I don’t expect this to change. So no Thank you Senator Coons I’ll let Trump handle it he’s been 10 for 10 so far. #MAGA
    Like (14)
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    Yes. Support Chris Coons’ bill. We need a co ordinated position across trade, tech, finance, diplomacy, intelligence, security...when it come to China. Actually we need this for all of our relationships with other nations. But especially right now, we really need this for interactions with China.
    Like (13)
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    Yes. China is positioning itself to become third super power between Russia and the US. We need to re-evaluate our strategy to mitigate being subjected to their political, financial, industrial and military influences.
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    Yes. China does jeopardize United States national and financial security. They threaten the South China Sea and US allies, they commit intellectual property theft, and they challenge Western Democracy and Capitalism. We need to have a plan for China’s rise - it isn’t in the best interests of the United States. It can’t hurt - we have nothing to lose from this bill if we take action.
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    I’m kinda thinking President Trump might already be on this, but hey let’s get this done. 1. Why are we doing business with a clear and present dangerous communist country? 2. They have clearly abused their citizens and ethnic groups, but Leftists don’t care because it doesn’t fit their agenda for today. 3. China is one of the most egregious climate destructive forces on earth but hey the leftists don’t care because it doesn’t fit the agenda for today. 4. Why are we doing business with a country that STEALS OUR Intellectual property and has and still sends spies into our country, DIANE FIENSTIEN has a spur in her entourage for over 20 YEARS. WHY ARE WE DOING BUSINESS IN CHINA!!! And where is the INTEGRITY of our leadership in Congress and the Senate and where has this gotten us in the last 50 years??? You are supposed to protect your constituents and your country.
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    Are we not?? What the hell is going on in washington!!!
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    This should have been accomplished long before now
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    This is a bipartisan strategy that recognizes in a rational manner the threat that is China in worldwide applications that are anathema to American interests and lays out a functional interagency approach to monitor and check a myriad of aggressions and perils to freedom. This is not currently in place and needs to be. Vote YES!
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    Normally I would have said yes! But we are living at a juncture in history that is existential! We need to remove our selves from creating climate catastrophes,perpetual wars and regime change tactics that further escalate into global conflict!! Quite to the contrary of creating a China confrontational strategy, as the Trump administration is hell bent on doing, we should be creating a strategy of domestic reform to make our country more democratic for economic as well as political strength!! As a foreign policy we should adopt a policy of development for our neighbors in helping Latin America acquire industrialization tools to stabilize and strengthen their societies as we prepare ourselves for a greater laborless society!! Manufacturing will return to America if we make the right adjustments because robotics will be cheaper than human labor in the long run! But the first step is defeating Trump if he does not resign first after impeachment!’ It is easy to listen to our oligarchic representatives who speak of a democracy we have never had. It is more difficult to accept the fact of an ever growing oligarchy of Fewer and fewer billionaires who hold our country hostage through Machiavellian schemes that exploit our political system for their benefit! But welfare capitalism for the billionaire class is not new to the world !! It is the prevailing system in most parts of the world independent of their claims of civil rights adherence or autocratic rule! A recent exception is The China we have seen in the last 30 years! China has taken the Chinese basics of a civilizational state and Confucianism which espouses meritocracy and virtue with the idea of a state for the benefit of all people, to usher China into modernity principally with Communist Party at the center!! The effort has reduced extreme poverty in China and the world significantly!! JimK is correct when he sees our lack of consistency in pursuing a consistent policy for our development in the US ! But that is only true is you consider 99% of the American people! It is not true if you consider the benefits to billionaires that have accrued since World War II!! We are now a now a Republic for crony capitalists! In order for TheUnited States to have a cohesive long term strategy for democracy here and win-win strategies in the world (that sees us as a bully and a terrorist power in the world, we need to: 1. Make voting a right and obligation like jury duty!! 2. We need to eliminate the electoral college!! 3. We need to ban private funding of national elections!! 4. Jurists must not be part of electoral politics!! 5. We must make the American people our only national interest, not creating wars for the benefit of the American Industrial Complex or other billionaires in petroleum or other industries that exploit natural resources in other countries! It is impossible to plan long term in a system that benefits the 1% on the backs of the 99%!!
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    I think this is a good idea not only regarding China but the as it relates to the world economy. I am surprised the USA doesn’t have this type of official awareness already. Are we so arrogant that we think we are invincible or will agencies like these make it more difficult to secretly fly a plane load of billions of dollars to a nation that is a known sponsor of terror around the world? I think it would also be a good idea to ensure (how?) the leaders and members of these agencies are not slowly corrupted like the FBI and Justice Department were under the Obama administration.
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    No. We already have government organizations that monitor trade with all other countries. What we need to do is get rid of #45 so the government can run smoothly
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    Defined strategy is preferable to transactional spurts and starts.
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    Probably best to wait until we HAVE a Federal government who works in the best interests of the entire country and not attempt to split the cognitive resources currently focused on impeachment. U.N. needs to look into how many other foreign heads Trump has solicited favors from. If our people do it it win become a governmental equivalent of Dr. Seuss’ Better Butter Battle ———- The battle lines are drawn and the fight gets real. There's a think tank working its way furiously to trump the enemy. Yooks and Zooks and their different styles of applying butter on the bread.
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    The hopscotch type of activity created by Trump is messing up the activity with China. We need a plan to get back to normalcy with China & to figure out a plan for the future.
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    The American people deserve to know there's a comprehensive plan for addressing China's growing power and interference, and the trade war seems to be meandering with no end in sight. This sounds like a good way of coordinating all agencies to develop and implement a plan to improve our approach to China.
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    Yes, somebody besides the LIAR IN CHIEF should.
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    In addition I would like to know what is being done to protect us from China having a market on our drugs. CNN says the generic drug market in which China is selling the ingredients to us and which we manufacture our into our generic drugs. These generic drugs are being pushed to us by the insurance companies because they are cheeper. Meanwhile these generic forms of our original drugs are not being individually tested. Additionally, according to CNN, these drugs contain unsafe amounts of carcinogens!! That’s right, our drugs are giving us cancer! Now that we are aware of this, Is anything being being done to protect us? This must be stopped! I don’t like being poisoned and would also like to know how this even came about!
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    Yes, we need a comprehensive, long-term plan to deal and trade with China. JimK is very knowledgeable about the history of our trade imbalance and root causes. I appreciate his comments on this subject.
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