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senate Bill S. 467

Allowing Low and Medium Risk Prisoners to Earn Credits for Early Release

Argument in favor

To reduce the size of the prison population, we must allow prisoners that are unlikely to reoffend to complete job training or drug counseling and spend part of their sentence under community supervision.

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05/14/2015
The American prison population, a huge portion of whom are nonviolent drug offenders, has exploded as a direct result of the miserable failure we call the War on Drugs. The US houses 5% of the world's population, but we incarcerate 25% of the world's inmates. We must stop treating drug use like a criminal issue, and treat it like the health problem it is. Sentencing minor drug offenders to rehab in lieu of prison is an excellent place to start. The next step is to shut down private prisons, whose existence depends on a high demand for inmates.
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sethenglish's Opinion
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05/14/2015
This allows prisoners to be rehabilitated, which should be the point of prison.
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05/14/2015
The idea behind the new American prison system is rehabilitation, and a part of that process must be job training and supervised interaction within the community.
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Argument opposed

Recidivism rates are high because prisoners are too tempted to return to crime after their release. Not only is this bill unlikely to succeed in its goals, but it poses major disadvantages to minority prisoners.

Ralph's Opinion
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05/14/2015
As a retired correction officer I know first hand that criminals who get a break are more likely to return to prison expecting the same break the next time. The parole system is not equipped to monitor a large influx of additional inmates. Lack of monitoring is one of the biggest failures of the parole system. The liberal media would have you believe that these are upstanding citizens that just need a second chance and while that is occasionally true it is the exception not the rule.
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Open.Your.Eyes's Opinion
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05/17/2015
Yes, America's prisons are overcrowded. Yes, this bill, if passed, might help free up a few cells. That is the lazy way to do it. This whole "penal system" in America needs to be rethought. Are our citizens so despicable that we have to boast housing 25% of the world's inmates? We shouldn't even be discussing the "tweaking" of our penal system. We should be working on rewriting it. Among the most popular reasons for incarceration is non-violent drug offenses. Ask someone who has been/is addicted to drugs; see if they would recommend a secluded cell or genuine human compassion to overcome their personal struggles. This bill poses no solutions, only more paperwork.
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Douglas's Opinion
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05/15/2015
Don't expect to get out early because you didn't do a serious crime. Don't do the crime if you can't do the time!
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    The American prison population, a huge portion of whom are nonviolent drug offenders, has exploded as a direct result of the miserable failure we call the War on Drugs. The US houses 5% of the world's population, but we incarcerate 25% of the world's inmates. We must stop treating drug use like a criminal issue, and treat it like the health problem it is. Sentencing minor drug offenders to rehab in lieu of prison is an excellent place to start. The next step is to shut down private prisons, whose existence depends on a high demand for inmates.
    Like (45)
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    As a retired correction officer I know first hand that criminals who get a break are more likely to return to prison expecting the same break the next time. The parole system is not equipped to monitor a large influx of additional inmates. Lack of monitoring is one of the biggest failures of the parole system. The liberal media would have you believe that these are upstanding citizens that just need a second chance and while that is occasionally true it is the exception not the rule.
    Like (9)
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    This allows prisoners to be rehabilitated, which should be the point of prison.
    Like (22)
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    The idea behind the new American prison system is rehabilitation, and a part of that process must be job training and supervised interaction within the community.
    Like (18)
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    Yes, America's prisons are overcrowded. Yes, this bill, if passed, might help free up a few cells. That is the lazy way to do it. This whole "penal system" in America needs to be rethought. Are our citizens so despicable that we have to boast housing 25% of the world's inmates? We shouldn't even be discussing the "tweaking" of our penal system. We should be working on rewriting it. Among the most popular reasons for incarceration is non-violent drug offenses. Ask someone who has been/is addicted to drugs; see if they would recommend a secluded cell or genuine human compassion to overcome their personal struggles. This bill poses no solutions, only more paperwork.
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    I think for this idea to work we need to improve prisoner's ability to join back society. Too many people return to crime because no one wants to hire them. By giving them better skills and helping then readjust will prevent them from returning to crime.
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    prison is to rehabilitate not make career prisoners. Whatever happened to prisoners making license plates or any other products that are needed.
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    The vast majority are non-violent drug offenders and shouldn't be in prison anyway. The drug war is a $5 trillion failure.
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    A change of life for a prisoner requires they have a clean slate. Prisoners who serve time and complete job training should have criminal records sealed from public. If the recommit crimes then a judge would rule whether the prior records are relevant to be part of a new trial.
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    We need fewer people incarcerated. As far as non violent drug offenses go, perhaps for basic possession of marijuana we should impose a large monetary fine, like $250 per gram or something. For second time offenders, kick it up to $350. For third time offenders, off to jail they go.
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    Don't expect to get out early because you didn't do a serious crime. Don't do the crime if you can't do the time!
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    They are in the cell for a reason. Leave them in there to serve the time THEY earned.
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    I feel like this would undermine the judicial/penal system. If you commit a crime, you must serve your time. However, given our current punishments on the books, these need to be drastically overhauled and revamped. Non violent drug offenders should not be thrown in jail nor should they get insane sentences. The system is broken. Fix it and then enforce it.
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    If they had jobs and a place to maybe but right now no.
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    If I were a victim if probably say no, so I would have to say ask the victims on a case by case basis...
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    How do you lock up someone for a addiction!!!!
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    The US has the most prisoners per capita than any other developed nation. We need to examine our entire system of sentencing
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    People make mistakes. Once you serve your time you should be allowed to return to society without stigmas following you. Non violent and none rape cases should be allowed to make amends and get early release
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    Any system that encourages people to improve themselves is a step in the right direction. Any system that potentially reduces our massive prison population is a step in the right direction.
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    Can we stop wasting our tax dollars on incarcerating low risk offenders for ridiculous amounts of time and clear some space for the real criminals?
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