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senate Bill S. 1182

Should the National Flood Insurance Program be Reauthorized Through November?

Argument in favor

There is broad consensus that the NFIP is poorly run, and Congress’s constant short-term reauthorizations of the program without addressing its managerial woes is unsustainable. This amendment puts pressure on the current Congress to address the NFIP’s issues this year.

Jugbo's Opinion
···
07/24/2018
Only if reconstruction of Puerto Rico is guaranteed.
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Michael 's Opinion
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07/24/2018
Revise the program to exclude homes of new owners that intentionally move to flood zones. Revise the amount of claims a homeowner can make to 1. After payout, they must move. Wind down the program and integrate into FEMA as an emergency program for non flood zones only. If you move to a flood zone intentionally, you should buy private insurance.
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07/31/2018
The effects of climate change are only going to worsen over time, and floods are likely to increase in many areas of our country. The federal flood insurance program developed a resource for recovery from flood damage that is kind of an early form of public-private partnership between the federal government as the insurer, working through private insurers who wrote and manage the policies. The insurance industry benefits by not suffering losses to its profits, the property owners in flood plain areas benefit by having their properties adequately covered, and the federal government (our tax money) foots the bill. Human behavior being what it is, gaming a system like this is one of the federal government’s constant plagues. The details are better understood by reading this short but informative Wikipedia article — https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Flood_Insurance_Program. Because of the increasing demands on the program, legislators have been working to find ways to better control costs and to refocus its program to eliminate abuse by corporate and rental property owners rebuilding in the the same sites after floods. The short-term renewals of the program are intended to allow for reshaping homeowner, rental owner and state and local government behaviors to avoid rebuilding in areas that will likely flood again, and hopefully decrease the demand on and misuse of the program. I would recommend renewing this program for the next term if the renewal application sufficiently specifies that there has been adequate progress toward such changes. IMHO, this program and the handling of it are a good example of appropriate oversight and management. Not perfect, by any means, but overall effective.
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Argument opposed

The Senate’s reauthorization of NFIP until January 2019 allows lawmakers more time to develop sound proposals for fixing the NFIP. A short-term extension to November 30 of this year is a political ploy to give the current Congress control over the NFIP’s future.

Christine's Opinion
···
07/24/2018
The only thing this congress needs to reform is itself.
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Rachel's Opinion
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07/25/2018
I don’t trust this Congress, would rather wait until the next Congress after the 2018 election. But it already passed, so let’s follow this and make sure it’s reformed properly enough to protect homeowners while not rewarding irresponsible developers who build in flood plains. Climate change risk must also be considered.
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Dicr's Opinion
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07/24/2018
Anytime politicians “bundle” bills they are hiding things. If a bill can’t stand on its own merits it probably wasn’t any good in the first place. To say you have to capitulate your view to get others to vote in favor of something is wrong. Ignoring climate change did nothing to help flooding. Insurance companies could do so much more to cover consumers, lobbying alone diverts millions from actually doing just that.
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What is Senate Bill S. 1182?

This legislation has been amended from its original form to extend the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP), which is currently set to expire on July 31, 2018, through November 30, 2018. It wouldn’t reform the program — it's only a short-term extension. The November 30 extension is shorter than the extension through January 2019 that the Senate approved on June 28, 2018 in its version of the Farm Bill. By offering a shorter extension period for the NFIP, this amendment gives the current Congress time to enact changes to the NFIP to make it more efficient. If the NFIP were to be extended through January 2019 as the Senate has approved, the NFIP’s long-term fate would be left to the 116th Congress.

Originally this bill authorized the minting of a commemorative coin for the American Legion's 100th anniversary.

Impact

Home and property owners in flood-prone areas; Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA); National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP); the Senate’s farm bill; the current Congress; and the 116th Congress.

Cost of Senate Bill S. 1182

A CBO cost estimate for this bill is unavailable.

More Information

In-DepthSponsoring Rep. Tom MacArthur (R-NJ) introduced this bill to ensure that NFIP coverage continues uninterrupted until a long-term reauthorization can be worked out:

“Without flood insurance, mortgages are unavailable, homes cannot be bought or sold and people are left exposed to nature’s ravages. This can has been kicked down the road long enough. [NFIP’s reauthorization] must happen for the sake of 140 million Americans who live in coastal counties.”

On the issue of a long-term NFIP reauthorization, Rep. MacArthur promised to continue working with House and Senate leadership on a long-term reauthorization that “gives homeowners certainty, ensures affordability, increases mitigation funds for shore communities, and instills accountability at FEMA for how they treat disaster victims

This bill has one cosponsor, also a Republican.


Of NoteThe National Flood Insurance Program was created in 1968 to reduce the impact of flooding on private and public structures. The NFIP provides affordable flood insurance to property owners, renters, and businesses. It also encourages communities to adopt and enforce floodplain management regulations.

According to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), which administers the NFIP, these efforts help mitigate the effects of flooding on new and improved structures. Additionally, for millions of households in the United States, the NFIP is their only source of flood insurance.

However, some argue that the NFIP is inefficient and poorly run. In its 50 years of operation, the NFIP has borrowed over $30 billion from taxpayers, and it currently operates on a $1.4 billion annual deficit. Additionally, some critics contend that the NFIP is not as innovative as it should be, given that it is a company with $1.2 trillion of insurance coverage.

Due to the NFIP’s large debt burden (it was $24.6 billion in 2017) and an imbalance between incoming premium payments and payments out to owners of flood-damaged properties, no one seriously expects the program’s financial situation to improve if it continues to be run as is. The Government Accountability Office (GAO), recognizing the NFIP’s untenable financial position, has had it on its “High Risk List” since 2006.

Over the past few years, the NFIP’s reauthorization and the terms under which the program should be extended have become a contentious issue in Congress.

The NFIP was originally set to expire on September 30, 2017, but was extended on a short-term basis to December 8, 2017. In the wake of massive storms in 2017, including hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria, the House passed Congressman Sean Duffy’s (R-WI) 21st Century Floor Reform Act (H.R. 2874), a collection of seven bills that would have reauthorized the NFIP for five years, introduced private market competition, and provided programmatic reforms to help policyholders.

However, the Senate did not act on H.R. 2874, and as a result, the NFIP received a second short-term extension through December 22, 2017 and a third short-term extension through January 19, 2018. The NFIP then briefly lapsed between January 20, 2018 and January 22, 2018, before receiving a fourth short-term reauthorization through February 8, 2018. It then lapsed for eight hours during a brief government shut-down in the early morning of February 9, 2018 before receiving an extension through July 31, 2018 in the omnibus spending bill.

With the July deadline approaching, the Senate approved its version of the farm bill, including an amendment extending the NFIP for six months, on June 28, 2018. However, some in the House oppose a six-month extension because it would leave the NFIP’s fate up to the 116th Congress. Extending the NFIP until only November 30, 2018 under this amendment would maximize pressure on Congress to enact a permanent solution that makes necessary reforms and provides certainty for insurance providers and housing markets.


Media:

Summary by Lorelei Yang

(Photo Credit: davidf / iStock)

AKA

National Flood Insurance Program Extension Act of 2018

Official Title

An act to extend the National Flood Insurance Program, and for other purposes.

bill Progress


  • EnactedJuly 31st, 2018
    The President signed this bill into law
  • The house Passed July 25th, 2018
    Roll Call Vote 366 Yea / 52 Nay
  • The senate Passed August 3rd, 2017
    Passed by Voice Vote
      senate Committees
      Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs
    IntroducedMay 18th, 2017

Log in or create an account to see how your Reps voted!
    Only if reconstruction of Puerto Rico is guaranteed.
    Like (122)
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    The only thing this congress needs to reform is itself.
    Like (83)
    Follow
    Share
    Revise the program to exclude homes of new owners that intentionally move to flood zones. Revise the amount of claims a homeowner can make to 1. After payout, they must move. Wind down the program and integrate into FEMA as an emergency program for non flood zones only. If you move to a flood zone intentionally, you should buy private insurance.
    Like (54)
    Follow
    Share
    I don’t trust this Congress, would rather wait until the next Congress after the 2018 election. But it already passed, so let’s follow this and make sure it’s reformed properly enough to protect homeowners while not rewarding irresponsible developers who build in flood plains. Climate change risk must also be considered.
    Like (35)
    Follow
    Share
    This Program needs to be stopped. Our National Government is not an insurance program. If you want to live in a floodplain, fine with me, but shouldn't have to rebuild your new home.
    Like (21)
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    The effects of climate change are only going to worsen over time, and floods are likely to increase in many areas of our country. The federal flood insurance program developed a resource for recovery from flood damage that is kind of an early form of public-private partnership between the federal government as the insurer, working through private insurers who wrote and manage the policies. The insurance industry benefits by not suffering losses to its profits, the property owners in flood plain areas benefit by having their properties adequately covered, and the federal government (our tax money) foots the bill. Human behavior being what it is, gaming a system like this is one of the federal government’s constant plagues. The details are better understood by reading this short but informative Wikipedia article — https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Flood_Insurance_Program. Because of the increasing demands on the program, legislators have been working to find ways to better control costs and to refocus its program to eliminate abuse by corporate and rental property owners rebuilding in the the same sites after floods. The short-term renewals of the program are intended to allow for reshaping homeowner, rental owner and state and local government behaviors to avoid rebuilding in areas that will likely flood again, and hopefully decrease the demand on and misuse of the program. I would recommend renewing this program for the next term if the renewal application sufficiently specifies that there has been adequate progress toward such changes. IMHO, this program and the handling of it are a good example of appropriate oversight and management. Not perfect, by any means, but overall effective.
    Like (11)
    Follow
    Share
    Anytime politicians “bundle” bills they are hiding things. If a bill can’t stand on its own merits it probably wasn’t any good in the first place. To say you have to capitulate your view to get others to vote in favor of something is wrong. Ignoring climate change did nothing to help flooding. Insurance companies could do so much more to cover consumers, lobbying alone diverts millions from actually doing just that.
    Like (9)
    Follow
    Share
    There is broad consensus that the NFIP is poorly run, and Congress’s constant short-term reauthorizations of the program without addressing its managerial woes is unsustainable. This amendment puts pressure on the current Congress to address the NFIP’s issues this year.
    Like (7)
    Follow
    Share
    No government funding for flood insurance. Get the government out of the flood insurance business. You choose to live in a flood zone, fine. You made a stupid choice. Don’t ask me to pay for you to rebuild. The government shouldn’t be encouraging development on floodplains. This country is huge. Find somewhere else.
    Like (7)
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    This program incentives developers to build Realestate in high risk areas because they know tax payers will be sent the bill if something goes wrong
    Like (6)
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    No, get the government out of the insurance business.
    Like (6)
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    National flood insurance is a great program to protect our citizens.
    Like (5)
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    Republicans prove yet again that they are not worthy of the office they hold. They are more concerned with politics than providing a service that protects American Citizens. With regard to this legislation, they are concerned that if they approve the extension now, they will not have an opportunity to mess with it next year and unethically and immorally remove all the Citizen protections and dismantle the legislation to provide more to Corporations and the 1%. In essence, Republicans are certain they will not control the house or the senate after the 2018 election, and therefore, they want to manipulate every thing they can before they lose big and all power. Republicans are not for The People, They are for only 1% and Corporations. Make America Great Again. Vote out Republicans in 2018. Save America.
    Like (5)
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    👍🏻FLOOD INSURANCE EXTENSION 👍🏻 I support the passage of legislation that has been amended from its original form to extend the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP), which is currently set to expire on July 31, 2018, through November 30, 2018. It wouldn’t reform the program — it's only a short-term extension. The November 30 extension is shorter than the extension through January 2019 that the Senate approved on June 28, 2018 in its version of the Farm Bill. By offering a shorter extension period for the NFIP, this amendment gives the current Congress time to enact changes to the NFIP to make it more efficient. If the NFIP were to be extended through January 2019 as the Senate has approved, the NFIP’s long-term fate would be left to the 116th Congress. There is broad consensus that the NFIP is poorly run, and Congress’s constant short-term reauthorizations of the program without addressing its managerial woes is unsustainable. This amendment puts pressure on the current Congress to address the NFIP’s issues this year. 7*24*18 ..........
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    Congress needs to quit tearing sh*t down. They’ve not even properly addressed PR from last year & its storm season again.
    Like (4)
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    I’m in support of reauthorizing it.
    Like (4)
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    Official title: a bill to require the Secretary of the Treasury to mint commemorative coins for what? WTF????
    Like (4)
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    There is broad consensus that the NFIP is poorly run, and Congress’s constant short-term reauthorizations of the program without addressing its managerial woes is unsustainable. This amendment puts pressure on the current Congress to address the NFIP’s issues this year.
    Like (3)
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    Yup! Hopefully a REAL Congress can fix it!!
    Like (3)
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    Wait for new Congress.
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