Like Causes?

Install the App
TRY NOW

house Bill H. Res. 754

Should the U.S. Support the Nicaraguan People’s Peaceful Protests & Increase Pressure on Daniel Ortega’s Regime for its Oppression?

Argument in favor

The House of Representatives should support the Nicaraguan people in their peaceful pursuit of democracy and actions by the U.S. & international community to hold the Ortega regime accountable for its human rights violations & violent crackdown on dissenters. It may be a simple gesture, but adopting this resolution would send a strong, bipartisan message.

jimK's Opinion
···
03/09/2020
I think that a resolution regarding our belief in supporting American principles and ideals in the peaceful protests of Nicaraguans opposed to dictatorial rule is a proper thing to do. This Congressional resolution rings a little hollow since our current governance does not live up to those ideals or principles. In other words, we are not living up to our principles that we endorse others to aspire to. Since a 'resolution' is only a statement of values and by itself, is not actionable, I support it. I agree with others who have already stated that they have no faith in our administration taking any action with regard to Nicaragua until we can cleanse ourselves from the Orange plague that currently infects us.
Like (48)
Follow
Share
···
03/23/2020
We need to stay the hell out of Central American politics. Our only assistance should be financial relief with no strings attached except a requirement that it go directly to organizations within the country who are providing direct relief to the people of those countries. In addition, as part of a global partnership, through the UN or NATO, with other countries to confront human rights abuses within the country. If we cannot do this or it is politically not feasible, we should do NOTHING! Let our neighbors to the south work out their own issues without any interference from the US. We have already done enough damage over the past 50 years to last many lifetimes. American businesses that have holdings and investments in these countries need to assess how they want to work with those governments, and develop their own plans. Our State Department should only be involved as an assurance of the safety of Americans working in those countries. Corporations have become multi-national and their interests are not always the same as ours. They benefit greatly from their overseas operations, and have historically made operational decisions that have undercut American workers in favor of cheaper overseas labor. No where has this been more true than with our neighbors to the south. Protecting the lives of Americans working for these corporations in other countries IS a national responsibility. Ensuring that corporations are protected from adverse conditions in those other countries is not, unless our government was a partner to that corporate involvement. Each incidence of overseas conflict with host countries must be assessed individually and any interventions decided upon and planned for would fall under the State Department’s purview. It is the responsibility of the State Department, in consultation with the Congress and the President to decide how to handle such issues. Please note: I am fully aware that this is not how all of this usually operates. I am offering my personal opinion which is all I can offer in response to this question. There are no one-size-fits-all answers to this very prickly issue for every country we engage. But IMHO, we barely have our own answers these days, and we are in no position to be pointing out the behaviors of other countries and advising them what to do!
Like (13)
Follow
Share
QwisQwasy's Opinion
···
03/09/2020
If they are not receiving their human rights than we should help them
Like (11)
Follow
Share

Argument opposed

This non-binding legislation won’t accomplish anything, and Congress should instead advance a sanctions package to increase pressure on the Ortega regime. Alternatively, the U.S. should leave the Ortega government alone and allow it to govern how it sees fit.

larubia's Opinion
···
03/09/2020
As much as I want to say yes, I don’t want this administration interfering in anymore countries, especially those that the president has made sure to demonize. Please wait until we have a sane, compassionate, intelligent leader who has some semblance of ethical behavior, before we step in.
Like (42)
Follow
Share
John's Opinion
···
03/09/2020
Normally, I would say yes. These are not normal times. I do NOT trust the Trump Administration to intervene in any other country. Let’s wait until the next President is elected in November. Let us focus on our own democracy, and demand fair and untampered elections. Demand additional polling places in places where the wait was more than an hour. Restore the Voting Rights Act to protect our elections.
Like (26)
Follow
Share
Kodiwodi's Opinion
···
03/09/2020
Non binding resolutions accomplish nothing. Save your energy and if you really want to support these people, draw up something binding or better yet foster diplomacy. That’s something we use to be good at. Bring it up as a new invention to Trump.
Like (8)
Follow
Share

What is House Bill H. Res. 754?

This resolution would express the sense of the House of Representatives that the U.S. should support the people of Nicaragua in their peaceful pursuit of democracy and human rights, and use tools under U.S. law to increase political and financial pressure on the Sandinista government of Daniel Ortega. It cites gross violations of human rights & repression carried out by the Ortega regime, such as: security forces killing over 325, injuring over 2,000, and arbitrarily detaining at least 800 peace protesters in 2018; causing an estimated 62,000 Nicaraguans to flee the country between April 2018 & April 2019; restricting press freedom; oppressing indigenous communities; and denying free & fair elections.

Specifically, this resolution would:

  • Call on the Ortega regime to release all political prisoners & cease the repression of dissent in Nicaragua;

  • Condemn the government’s failure to comply with agreements it made with the Organization of American States;

  • Urge the Ortega to respect Nicaraguans’ constitutional rights & implement free, fair, multiparty elections open to international observers;

  • Express full support for the Nicaraguan people, media, and civil society in their pursuit of a peaceful return to democratic order;

  • Recognize & support U.S. government efforts to promote democracy in Nicaragua and hold corrupt actors & human rights abusers in the regime accountable;

  • Urge the U.S. government to continue to apply pressure on the Ortega regime & consider additional sanctions against officials who’ve violated human rights or committed significant acts of corruption; and

  • Urge the international community to hold the Ortega regime accountable for human rights abuses, including attacks on religious freedom, and restrict its access to foreign financing unless or until it allows for free, fair, and prompt elections open to monitoring by credible international & local electoral observers.

As a simple resolution, this legislation is non-binding and wouldn’t advance beyond the House if adopted.

Impact

The Nicaraguan people; the Ortega regime; U.S. & international agencies; and Congress.

Cost of House Bill H. Res. 754

As a non-binding resolution, this bill would have no cost.

More Information

In-DepthRep. Albio Sires (D-NJ) introduced this resolution to express support for Nicaraguans’ efforts to restore democracy in their country and call on President Daniel Ortega to cease his repression of peaceful protesters, social leaders, and the political opposition:

“Ortega’s authoritarian rule has caused needless suffering in Nicaragua, the second poorest country in the Western Hemisphere. Ortega and his thugs killed and tortured hundreds of peaceful protesters last year, and are now carrying out targeted attacks against campesinos and rural land rights activists. We must send a strong, bipartisan message to Ortega and his cronies: cease this repression, allow international human rights monitors to visit the country, and call early elections or face further sanctions. I continue to stand shoulder to shoulder with those brave Nicaraguans who are risking everything in their pursuit of freedom and dignity.”

Lead Republican cosponsor Rep. Francis Rooney (R-FL) added:

“It was a privilege to meet with the leaders of Nicaragua’s opposition and observe their commitment to unity against the Ortega regime and his murderous cronies. The people of Nicaragua deserve freedom, democracy and the right to free and fair elections. I stand with them in their struggle for a peaceful transition to democracy for Nicaragua.”

The bipartisan leadership of the House Foreign Affairs Committee were original cosponsors of this resolution. Chairman Eliot Engel (D-NY) said:

“Congress will not turn a blind eye to Daniel Ortega’s constant violations of the Nicaraguan people’s human rights. There is no doubt that these are dark days for human rights and democracy in Nicaragua. But, I also believe that there is reason for optimism for the country’s future. Meeting with Nicaragua’s unified opposition leaders today gave me hope that brighter days are ahead. The Nicaraguan people can continue to count on Congress’s bipartisan support for a return to a full democracy in the country.”

Ranking Member Michael McCaul (R-TX) added:

“I was proud to meet with the leaders of Nicaragua’s democratic opposition. I commend them for their bravery and leadership in the face of the Ortega regime’s abuse and repression. I will always stand firmly with the freedom-loving people of Nicaragua in their struggle for free and fair elections, and demand justice for the victims of human rights abuses at the hands of this brutal dictatorship.”

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT), an avowed socialist, spoke in favor of the Sandinistas during the 1980s and traveled to Nicaragua to meet with Daniel Ortega in 1985 when he was the mayor of Burlington, Vermont. While he said the Sandinistas were wrong to force indigenous communities to abandon their homes, he wrote a letter inviting Ortega to Burlington which lamented that U.S. media hadn’t “reflected fairly the goals and accomplishments of your administration.” According to The Free Press, a Vermont-based newspaper, Sanders told American reporters who accompanied him that, “You are worms” for not reporting “the truth” about Ortega.

After Sanders received a letter from a Burlington constituent who called for the then-mayor to reverse his pro-Sandinista position, Sanders wrote a letter asserting that the Sandinistas’ “temporary suspension of certain civil liberties is considerably more complex” than the constituent understood; and that the Sandinistas did so because they didn’t intend to “allow their enemy the total freedom to defeat them and destroy their government.” Sanders concluded:

“My concern about Nicaragua is, frankly, not whether people think the Nicaraguan government is a good or bad government or whether President Ortega has done the right thing in this action. To me, the overriding issue is whether or not the United States has the unilateral right to go to war and destroy a government that President Reagan and members of Congress dislike.”

Joe Biden, who was a U.S. senator in the 1980s and is also seeking the Democratic presidential nomination, voted against funding for the Ortega’s opponents in the 1980s. In 2018, he wrote:

“Instead of respecting the will of their people, the governments of Nicolas Maduro in Venezuela and Daniel Ortega in Nicaragua have confronted peaceful protesters with force, even armed vigilantes. They have limited the freedoms of expression and assembly necessary for political dialogue and arrested their political opponents.”

This legislation passed the House Foreign Affairs Committee by unanimous consent and has the support of 27 bipartisan cosponsors, including 19 Democrats and 8 Republicans.


Of NotePresident Daniel Ortega rose to power as the leader of Nicaragua’s communist Sandinista movement, which toppled the Somoza dynasty in 1979, won the 1984 elections, and ruled the country through 1989. The Sandinistas were involved in a civil war with the U.S.-backed Contras throughout the 1980s during which both sides were accused of war crimes. The war ended in 1990 when Ortega lost the presidential election to liberal opposition candidate Violeta Chamorro. 

Ortega was re-elected 17 years later in 2017, and has ruled the country since after changes were made to the Nicaraguan constitution in 2009 and 2016 to allow him to run for successive terms. In 2018, widespread peaceful protests broke out calling for his resignation after pro-Ortega groups violently a demonstration against Nicaragua’s pension reforms. The crackdown saw over 325 killed, 2,000 injured, and over 800 arbitrarily detained.


Media:

Summary by Eric Revell

(Photo Credit: mejiaperalta via Flickr / Creative Commons)

AKA

Expressing the sense of the House of Representatives that the United States should continue to support the people of Nicaragua in their peaceful efforts to promote democracy and human rights, and use the tools under United States law to increase political

Official Title

Expressing the sense of the House of Representatives that the United States should continue to support the people of Nicaragua in their peaceful efforts to promote democracy and human rights, and use the tools under United States law to increase political and financial pressure on the government of Daniel Ortega, as amended

simple resolution Progress


  • The house has not voted
    IntroducedDecember 9th, 2019
    I think that a resolution regarding our belief in supporting American principles and ideals in the peaceful protests of Nicaraguans opposed to dictatorial rule is a proper thing to do. This Congressional resolution rings a little hollow since our current governance does not live up to those ideals or principles. In other words, we are not living up to our principles that we endorse others to aspire to. Since a 'resolution' is only a statement of values and by itself, is not actionable, I support it. I agree with others who have already stated that they have no faith in our administration taking any action with regard to Nicaragua until we can cleanse ourselves from the Orange plague that currently infects us.
    Like (48)
    Follow
    Share
    As much as I want to say yes, I don’t want this administration interfering in anymore countries, especially those that the president has made sure to demonize. Please wait until we have a sane, compassionate, intelligent leader who has some semblance of ethical behavior, before we step in.
    Like (42)
    Follow
    Share
    Normally, I would say yes. These are not normal times. I do NOT trust the Trump Administration to intervene in any other country. Let’s wait until the next President is elected in November. Let us focus on our own democracy, and demand fair and untampered elections. Demand additional polling places in places where the wait was more than an hour. Restore the Voting Rights Act to protect our elections.
    Like (26)
    Follow
    Share
    We have serious issues that demand immediate action in this country. Republicans refused to remove the Trump cancer from our government and the consequences for not doing so are compounding daily. Ditch the Mitch! He’s Donnie’s useless bitch.
    Like (17)
    Follow
    Share
    We need to stay the hell out of Central American politics. Our only assistance should be financial relief with no strings attached except a requirement that it go directly to organizations within the country who are providing direct relief to the people of those countries. In addition, as part of a global partnership, through the UN or NATO, with other countries to confront human rights abuses within the country. If we cannot do this or it is politically not feasible, we should do NOTHING! Let our neighbors to the south work out their own issues without any interference from the US. We have already done enough damage over the past 50 years to last many lifetimes. American businesses that have holdings and investments in these countries need to assess how they want to work with those governments, and develop their own plans. Our State Department should only be involved as an assurance of the safety of Americans working in those countries. Corporations have become multi-national and their interests are not always the same as ours. They benefit greatly from their overseas operations, and have historically made operational decisions that have undercut American workers in favor of cheaper overseas labor. No where has this been more true than with our neighbors to the south. Protecting the lives of Americans working for these corporations in other countries IS a national responsibility. Ensuring that corporations are protected from adverse conditions in those other countries is not, unless our government was a partner to that corporate involvement. Each incidence of overseas conflict with host countries must be assessed individually and any interventions decided upon and planned for would fall under the State Department’s purview. It is the responsibility of the State Department, in consultation with the Congress and the President to decide how to handle such issues. Please note: I am fully aware that this is not how all of this usually operates. I am offering my personal opinion which is all I can offer in response to this question. There are no one-size-fits-all answers to this very prickly issue for every country we engage. But IMHO, we barely have our own answers these days, and we are in no position to be pointing out the behaviors of other countries and advising them what to do!
    Like (13)
    Follow
    Share
    If they are not receiving their human rights than we should help them
    Like (11)
    Follow
    Share
    I think freedom is cool
    Like (9)
    Follow
    Share
    It’s a fine line between sending a message & interfering. If it’s just a message that is easily sent but the US should refrain from interfering.
    Like (8)
    Follow
    Share
    How about for once just staying out of Central and South American politics, we’ve caused them enough greif with our intervention throughout the 20th Century.
    Like (8)
    Follow
    Share
    Non binding resolutions accomplish nothing. Save your energy and if you really want to support these people, draw up something binding or better yet foster diplomacy. That’s something we use to be good at. Bring it up as a new invention to Trump.
    Like (8)
    Follow
    Share
    Everyone deserves their basic human rights.
    Like (6)
    Follow
    Share
    We went through this way back in the 80s! We won the Damned thing in Nicaragua and El Salvador! We had a lot of our troops down there “Yours Truly Included”! A lot of advisors and special forces and Covert intelligence assets! A lot of time and money went into turning Central America around and restore decency as we chased the Soviets and Cubans OUT! Then after Reagan the succeeding administrations Dems mostly turned their backs on Central and South America! Everything that happens in this hemisphere directly affects us! That’s why President Monroe brought to us his doctrine! Invoke it and Use it! We are the premier power in this hemisphere and a lot of American men fought and died way south over the last couple of centuries! Also as our southern border was invaded by many from that area fir decades and now closing Thank God! If any of you crybaby screaming left wing goofballs chiming in have never put in a uniform fir this country and dint have a Damned clue would have? Then your opinions would be different now! However most of you have not therefore your left wing crybaby opinion dies not matter! At Point Saline in Grenada The Soviets and Cubans built a 10,000 foot runway! Most airports don’t have that. Next to those runways were several large storage facilities each 100 yards long and 50 yards wide! Full of Soviet/Russian equipment! Artillery! A lot of anti tank and anti aircraft guns! Mortars and w while lot of AK-47 assault rifles and RPG ANTI TANK weapons along with a whole lot of Ammunition! We had to go through and photograph, identify and document everything! You crybaby lefties don’t have a clue!
    Like (6)
    Follow
    Share
    Right on, Singinghawk926. We need to clean out our OWN house, before we do anything else!
    Like (5)
    Follow
    Share
    Nicaragua perfectly exemplifies how socialism can only be maintained by force! Perhaps the greatest quote in history on the true nature of socialism was offered by British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, who observed that, “the problem with socialism is that you eventually run out of other people’s money.” For purposes of style we might paraphrase it as: “socialism is a great idea, until you run out of other people’s money to spend.” The "democratic socialists" as they call themselves, cannot even keep the wealthy from moving away from New York City and LA with their crazy SALT taxes, and they think they can tax them federally to pay for everyone's healthcare and education?! LMAO! No the wealthy would just leave the US, and take our jobs with them to a place they can make a profit. And the democratic socialists would have no choice but to make us the next Nicaragua, that is, if we let it get to that point. We must fight against Socialism here first, now, before we can help others.
    Like (5)
    Follow
    Share
    While I am in support for the US to express their support for democracy and human rights, I am not in support of the US to take any further action(s). The US is not the police of the world and must learn to keep out of other countries' business.
    Like (5)
    Follow
    Share
    No. We should sanction SF and Portland, however.
    Like (4)
    Follow
    Share
    I would LOVE to say YES!! But with this administration in office IT IS WORTHLESS to try to BE what we are NOT ANYMORE. We used to have a Democratic plain to work from, but with this Trump bunch in office there isn’t even a plain, let alone one with a Democratic one to stand on. Everything Trump has done has been to destroy Democracy and he’s almost there. He’s pulled out & left our Kurd friends to the Russian & Turkish dogs, he started a fight with Iran because Putin wanted him to, and he’s now pulling out of Afghanistan without a Peace agreement that includes the government of the country who we are throwing to the Taliban Wolves. SO, WHY & HOW CAN WE INFLUENCE ANY OTHER COUNTRY TO BE WHAT WE ARE NOT???
    Like (4)
    Follow
    Share
    Once again, well said....Jim K.
    Like (4)
    Follow
    Share
    We need to steer clear of any foreign interactions until tRump is out of office.
    Like (4)
    Follow
    Share
    Agreed JimK
    Like (3)
    Follow
    Share
    MORE