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house Bill H.R. 74

Do High-Cost Regulations Need a Judicial Review Before Going Into Effect?

Argument in favor

There needs to be an opportunity for interested parties to request a judicial review of a soon-to-be final regulation when the rule’s cost to America’s economy exceeds $1 billion.

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01/26/2017
Yes because (1) this is a check on an otherwise unchecked power of the executive branch to essentially pass non-congressional legislation, (2) when it says that a regulation "costs the American economy $1 billion," keep in mind that "the economy" is ultimately you and me, and (3) all regulation should be subject to review and dismissal, as it is all unconstitutional.
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01/27/2017
Both Congress and the president will have an opportunity in 2017 to roll back costly new rules that have been imposed on the American people by the outgoing administration. One powerful tool they can use to accomplish this task is the Congressional Review Act. This long-neglected tool provides Congress with the power to swiftly remove months of Obama administration rules from the books, and to help ensure that they don’t come back. Congress should be aggressive in employing the authority embedded in this statute.
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Matt's Opinion
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01/07/2017
The president-elect has made misleading, fantastical promises to supporters, made enemies of fellow Americans, flirts treasonously with foreign powers, and shown a psychologically-questionable judgement that threatens our national security, global influence, and economic stability. Like never before in American history, we should extend congressional common sense oversight--even from patriotic Republicans--over the executive branch.
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Argument opposed

People or businesses that want to comment on pending regulations already have plenty of chances to have their voices heard long before a regulation take effect.

Jeff's Opinion
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01/26/2017
Under existing law, any person -- corporate or natural -- can already sue for judicial review of any regulation after it passes. However, virtually the only type of plaintiff that sues to invalidate regulations are big business mess and their interest groups. This bill would provide big businesses and their interest groups yet another way to prevent health, safety, environmental protection, and financial stability regulations from becoming law. Business groups are already very successful at stifling safeguard regulations they don't agree with. For example, since 2010, investment bankers have successfully invalidated most regulations passed to implement the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act. Regulations are already subject to layers upon layers of review under the Administrative Procedure Act and similar laws and Executive Orders -- many of which can be reviewed at any time after the bill passes. Don't give big businesses yet another advantage in blocking safeguard regulations. Don't give them control over whether safeguards they disagree with can take effect at all.
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Joe's Opinion
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01/26/2017
Given the fact that it's co-signers are strictly Republicans, this bill seems to be very partisan. That alone makes me a bit suspicious. A real world example of how this would play out: Republicans would have loved to have had this in place prior to ACA/Obamacare because they could just continue to throw lawsuits at it until the Sun burns out.
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sandydubya's Opinion
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01/26/2017
Much rather see a Legislative review to make certain the intent of the originating law was met. It's bad enough that we have courts legislating from the bench to begin with. Much rather see the Article 1 project make the Congress do their job, and not let bureaucrats be unelected lawmakers.
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    Yes because (1) this is a check on an otherwise unchecked power of the executive branch to essentially pass non-congressional legislation, (2) when it says that a regulation "costs the American economy $1 billion," keep in mind that "the economy" is ultimately you and me, and (3) all regulation should be subject to review and dismissal, as it is all unconstitutional.
    Like (24)
    Follow
    Share
    Under existing law, any person -- corporate or natural -- can already sue for judicial review of any regulation after it passes. However, virtually the only type of plaintiff that sues to invalidate regulations are big business mess and their interest groups. This bill would provide big businesses and their interest groups yet another way to prevent health, safety, environmental protection, and financial stability regulations from becoming law. Business groups are already very successful at stifling safeguard regulations they don't agree with. For example, since 2010, investment bankers have successfully invalidated most regulations passed to implement the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act. Regulations are already subject to layers upon layers of review under the Administrative Procedure Act and similar laws and Executive Orders -- many of which can be reviewed at any time after the bill passes. Don't give big businesses yet another advantage in blocking safeguard regulations. Don't give them control over whether safeguards they disagree with can take effect at all.
    Like (46)
    Follow
    Share
    Given the fact that it's co-signers are strictly Republicans, this bill seems to be very partisan. That alone makes me a bit suspicious. A real world example of how this would play out: Republicans would have loved to have had this in place prior to ACA/Obamacare because they could just continue to throw lawsuits at it until the Sun burns out.
    Like (26)
    Follow
    Share
    Both Congress and the president will have an opportunity in 2017 to roll back costly new rules that have been imposed on the American people by the outgoing administration. One powerful tool they can use to accomplish this task is the Congressional Review Act. This long-neglected tool provides Congress with the power to swiftly remove months of Obama administration rules from the books, and to help ensure that they don’t come back. Congress should be aggressive in employing the authority embedded in this statute.
    Like (15)
    Follow
    Share
    Much rather see a Legislative review to make certain the intent of the originating law was met. It's bad enough that we have courts legislating from the bench to begin with. Much rather see the Article 1 project make the Congress do their job, and not let bureaucrats be unelected lawmakers.
    Like (15)
    Follow
    Share
    The president-elect has made misleading, fantastical promises to supporters, made enemies of fellow Americans, flirts treasonously with foreign powers, and shown a psychologically-questionable judgement that threatens our national security, global influence, and economic stability. Like never before in American history, we should extend congressional common sense oversight--even from patriotic Republicans--over the executive branch.
    Like (10)
    Follow
    Share
    The management of regulations is the responsibility of the Executive branch of government, not the Judicial branch. The Constitution separates the powers of the federal government for a good reason! The term "trias politica" or "separation of powers" was coined by Charles-Louis de Secondat, baron de La Brède et de Montesquieu, an 18th century French social and political philosopher. His publication, Spirit of the Laws, is considered one of the great works in the history of political theory and jurisprudence, and it inspired the Declaration of the Rights of Man and the Constitution of the United States. Under his model, the political authority of the state is divided into legislative, executive and judicial powers. He asserted that, to most effectively promote liberty, these three powers must be separate and acting independently. Separation of powers, therefore, refers to the division of government responsibilities into distinct branches to limit any one branch from exercising the core functions of another. The intent is to prevent the concentration of power and provide for checks and balances.
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    I believe any regulation that adds a cost of over one million dollars should need congressional approval. If the regulation is not taken up by congress and voted in the affirmative it does not go into affect.
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    Anything that halts or slows new rules from the federal govt from going into effect is ok by me.
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    All and any new regulations needs close scrutiny regardless of costs. More time, the better to read the fine print.
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    Regulations for decades now have turned into nasty partisan politics on both sides of the aisle, democrat and republican. Neither party has the monopoly on this but the pieces on the game board are the livelihoods and success of corporations, businesses and hard working Americans. The power brokers, lobbyists and career politicians dealing out favors and kickbacks to those who help push burdensome regulation in order to justify big government and regulatory bodies have become ludicrous. This could be a check and balance to counter such bad regulations.
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    All EOs need a judicial review
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    Checks and balances is our way.
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    This is the sneaky administration...we need extra time to cut through the misinformation and outright lies!
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    Quoted from Tucker for emphasis: "Yes because (1) this is a check on an otherwise unchecked power of the executive branch to essentially pass non-congressional legislation, (2) when it says that a regulation "costs the American economy $1 billion," keep in mind that "the economy" is ultimately you and me, and (3) all regulation should be subject to review and dismissal, as it is all unconstitutional." It would be great if this app would include the text of the constitution as many cite it in support of what are actually unconstitutional powers used by the executive branch.
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    This is a political roadblock to would-be meaningful and helpful legislation.
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    Judicial checks are fundamental to democracy.
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    No. Only because these regulations are supposed to be overseen by the part of government that the Constitution grants the most power to. CONGRESS!!
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    Regulatory policy needs to be kept separate from politics. Support regulatory independence!
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    If you have children and grandchildren, please think of their future when casting your votes!!
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