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house Bill H.R. 7027

Should Congress Give Child Care Providers $50 Billion in Aid During the COVID-19 Pandemic?

Argument in favor

Child care providers have been hit hard by the COVID-19 pandemic. Congress should stabilize these essential businesses, whose services are necessary to working families, to ensure that they make it through the current public health crisis. Stabilizing child care providers is especially important in communities of color, where businesses may have trouble accessing more institutional forms of capital.

jimK's Opinion
···
07/29/2020
Yes. If the government feels compelled to force a jump start of the economy, they need to support the things that are needed for people to get back to work. Child care is one of those things that need support, as is making schools Covid safe. I do not believe that it is possible to force people back to work at this time - at least not for more than a short period of time, after which exploding Covid infections will force a costly national lock-down as the only course of action.
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JunnaLayn's Opinion
···
07/29/2020
Yes - this is good for when things are normal. Things are NOT NORMAL NOW - So YES this RIGHT NOW and MORE! - food for those children - housing for those children - Utilities for that household - medical care for those children - WiFi for those children - PC/laptop/iPad for those children - on-line education only for all children - in-service training for teachers to be effective on-line - PPE for the parents of those children - testing weekly for the family and provider - I'm just sayin, providing child care is a small start on what our children need. Yesterday I scolded those who said people should have saved for a rainy day - that that day passed months ago and we are in a storm. So for those of you now saying the government should not pay for child care - OMG - YOU have not been living pay-check to pay-check and then til the end of unemployment and you're renting and the eviction protection was lifted on 7/24. Please tell me - where can a family find the money to pay for child care today? Please wake up to the realities the of what the greater numbers of our population are facing!
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larubia's Opinion
···
07/29/2020
Childcare is essential to the workforce returning to work and for parents who need to quarantine. At a time when schools may need to be virtual, this will also put additional demands upon childcare workers. The monies are needed.
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Argument opposed

Congress has already allocated $3.5 billion to child care providers in the CARES Act, so this legislation is unnecessary. Child care providers that need assistance now can apply for Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) loans, which are meant to help small businesses like them remain solvent during the pandemic. Additionally, if current lockdowns continue, many families may not need child care providers outside the home — so it’s possible that child care providers won’t be needed in the new normal.

burrkitty's Opinion
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07/29/2020
I DO NOT think this is a good idea. This will encourage the Petri dish called child care to reopen. That’s not a good idea. So no. Stay closed. Keep your kids yourselves, focus on your family, stay safe, and STAY HOME.
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ManfromNebraska's Opinion
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07/29/2020
Congress has already allocated $3.5 billion to child care providers in the CARES Act, so this legislation is unnecessary. Child care providers that need assistance now can apply for Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) loans, which are meant to help small businesses like them remain solvent during the pandemic. This is a duplication and would be misappropriated or misused. Vote no.
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Sneaky-Pete's Opinion
···
07/29/2020
👎👎House Bill H.R. 7029 AKA Child Care is Essential Act👍👍 I stand opposed to and don't recommend the passage of House bill H.R. 7029 AKA the Child Care is Essential Act, would provide $50 billion in child care funding for coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic relief. To this end, it would create a $50 billion Child Care Stabilization Fund within the existing Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) program. Congress has already allocated $3.5 billion to child care providers in the CARES Act, so this legislation is unnecessary. Child care providers that need assistance now can apply for Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) loans, which are meant to help small businesses like them remain solvent during the pandemic. Additionally, if current lockdowns continue, many families may not need child care providers outside the home — so it’s possible that child care providers won’t be required for the new normal. Q. 7.28.20. SP
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What is House Bill H.R. 7027?

This legislation, the Child Care is Essential Act, would provide $50 billion in child care funding for coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic relief. To this end, it would create a $50 billion Child Care Stabilization Fund within the existing Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) program.

Grants provided to child care providers could be used for:

  • Personnel costs, including premium pay, employee benefits, and employee salaries;
  • Sanitization and cleaning, personal protective equipment, and other necessary equipment; 
  • Training and professional development related to health and safety practices; 
  • Fixed costs, including mortgage obligations, rent, utilities, and insurance;
  • Mental health supports for children and employees;
  • Modifications to child care services as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic; and
  • Other goods and services necessary to maintain or resume operation of the child care program, or to maintain the viability of the child care provider.

All providers who receive funds through this grant would be required to continue employing and paying their staff at pre-pandemic levels. As a condition of receiving grant funds, they would also be required to provide families with relief from copayments and tuition.

Grant recipients who are open would be required to meet health and safety guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and state and local authorities. Recipients who are closed would have to provide an assurance that they will reopen their programs when they’re able to implement applicable health and safety guidance.

Impact

Families; children; child care providers; and the Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) program.

Cost of House Bill H.R. 7027

$50.00 Billion
The CBO estimates that this legislation would cost $50 billion over the 2020-2025 period.

More Information

In-DepthSponsoring Rep. Rosa DeLauro (D-CT) introduced this bill to provide $50 billion in pandemic assistance to the child care industry:

“The workers and small business owners that care for our children while we work desperately need the federal government’s help. The COVID-19 pandemic has our nation on the precipice of an economic catastrophe the likes of which we have never seen, and child care providers are facing financial ruin. To date, the Congress has provided much needed funding to deal with the crisis—passing a $3.5 billion infusion in the CARES Act and $7 billion in the House-passed Heroes Act—but now needs to do much more to meet the demands of this historic moment. That is why we must invest $50 billion to support our nation’s working families and this critical industry in our economy. I urge my colleagues in the Appropriations Committee and throughout the Congress to join us in this effort.”

Sen. Patty Murray (D-WA), sponsor of this bill’s Senate companion, says:

"We absolutely cannot overlook the critical role child care will play in our nation’s ability to recover from the current COVID-19 crisis. Right now, frontline workers are relying on access to child care in order to keep our communities safe, healthy and fed. Yet, our entire child care system is struggling to keep doors open for families. I have talked to child care providers across Washington state and each one of them has told me that their business just can’t survive this crisis without support. We have long had a child care crisis in this country, but if the federal government doesn’t step up immediately, not only will frontline workers be unable to stay on the job, but families across the country might not have child care providers to return to once our economy opens up. Every day we wait the child care crisis worsens—we have to do everything we can to make sure that all families—not just the wealthiest families—have access to child care right now, and in the future.”

The National Women’s Law Center (NWLC) is among a number of women’s advocacy organizations supporting this legislation. Its President and CEO, Fatima Goss Graves, says:

“This crisis has laid bare how dependent our entire economy is on access to affordable, high-quality child care. The labor of essential workers is made possible by this diverse, women-led industry, without whom millions of working parents will not be able to return to their jobs. The child care industry has long been undervalued by a worldview that sees women and the jobs we perform as less deserving and less essential, and any attempt to reopen our economy must not make that same mistake. We applaud the leadership of Senator Murray and Representatives DeLauro and Scott in seeking the robust investment sorely needed by child care providers, working families, and an entire generation of children.”

The NWLC’s director of child care and early learning, Catherine White, adds that child care is an essential element of helping parents, and particularly women, get back to work:

“Parents, especially women, will not have the care they need to go back to work or school, employers will be unable to restart without workers, and our economic recovery will be jeopardized… Child care is the invisible support that’s been underpinning our economy and job system for decades.”

The Center for American Progress (CAP) supports this legislation. Its Vice President of Early Childhood Policy, Katie Hamm, says:

“Without robust federal investments like those made under this bill, nearly half of the country’s child care supply is at risk of permanent closure because of the coronavirus pandemic. This toll would suppress America’s ability to rebound from this crisis by making it impossible for parents to find child care, driving up its already unaffordable price, and costing tens of thousands of child care workers—most of whom are women and people of color—their jobs. To help our economy and families thrive, and to give employers certainty that child care won’t prevent their workers from returning to work, Congress should pass this bill and the president should sign it immediately.”

Chris Herbst, an associate professor studying public policy at Arizona State and the author of a new paper on child care supply, warns that the COVID-19 pandemic could permanently alter parents’ child care preferences. For example, parents who prioritize safety may choose to keep children home or prioritize small programs with stringent COVID-19 prevention measures. If there’s a mismatch between the child care services that government supports and the child care services that parents prefer, Herbst warns, the government could “end up propping up the wrong set of businesses,” which would be inefficient.

Senate Republicans, who have urged restraint in future coronavirus relief spending, are demanding that any future COVID-19 relief legislation be narrowly targeted. Given this, it’s unclear whether they’ll support this legislation’s high level of investment.

This legislation has 140 bipartisan House cosponsors, including 139 Democrats and one Republican. Its Senate companion, sponsored by Sen. Patty Murray (D-WA), has 36 Senate cosponsors, including 34 Democrats and two Independents.

More than 80 national organizations, including the Center for American Progress (CAP), MomsRising, National Women’s Law Center, and Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP), support this legislation.


Of NoteThe COVID-19 pandemic has hurt the child care sector significantly. Over half of childcare providers have closed during the pandemic. According to the Center for American Progress (CAP), without assistance to childcare providers, up to 4.5 million child care slots could be lost permanently.

To date, Congress has given the child care sector $3.5 billion in pandemic funding in the CARES Act. The House has also passed $10 billion in the Moving Forward Act, which finances grants to improve child-care centers and help them fund construction, renovations, and improvements to address both longstanding issues and new challenges posed by COVID-19. An additional $7 billion in the HEROES Act (which hasn’t been considered in the Senate due to Republican opposition) is also pending. The White House has issued statements of administration policy opposing both the HEROES Act and Moving Forward Act.

However, the Child Welfare League of America (CWLA) contends that much more assistance is needed. In a March child care coalition, the CWLA and others wrote:

“Because child care is a $99 billion industry, much larger and ongoing investments will be needed to preserve the child care system so that it works for children, families, educators, businesses, and our nation’s economy. Child care’s essential status demands dedicated relief that acknowledges the unique needs of a system that was already teetering on the edge of financial viability before this pandemic. Specifically, we request that Congress provide at least $50 billion in total funding dedicated to child care to offer immediate relief to providers, educators, and families during this crisis.”

In a recent estimate, the National Women’s Law Center (NWLC) found that it would take at least $9.6 billion per month to keep current child care providers solvent.

According to CAP, the need for assistance is especially acute among child care providers in communities of color; such businesses may struggle to access small-business loans, such as those through the PPP, due to systemic discrimination in banking practices, the wealth gap, and higher debt.

Some states, including Vermont, Minnesota, Indiana, North Dakota, and Tennessee, have already taken action to stabilize child care providers on their own. These states are using emergency grant programs, tuition replacement, and other forms of support to keep child care providers within their borders afloat during the pandemic.


Media:

Summary by Lorelei Yang

(Photo Credit: iStockphoto.com / FamVeld)

AKA

Child Care Is Essential Act

Official Title

Making additional supplemental appropriations for disaster relief requirements for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2020, and for other purposes.

bill Progress


  • Not enacted
    The President has not signed this bill
  • The senate has not voted
  • The house Passed July 29th, 2020
    Roll Call Vote 249 Yea / 163 Nay
    IntroducedMay 27th, 2020

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    Yes. If the government feels compelled to force a jump start of the economy, they need to support the things that are needed for people to get back to work. Child care is one of those things that need support, as is making schools Covid safe. I do not believe that it is possible to force people back to work at this time - at least not for more than a short period of time, after which exploding Covid infections will force a costly national lock-down as the only course of action.
    Like (72)
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    I DO NOT think this is a good idea. This will encourage the Petri dish called child care to reopen. That’s not a good idea. So no. Stay closed. Keep your kids yourselves, focus on your family, stay safe, and STAY HOME.
    Like (14)
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    Yes - this is good for when things are normal. Things are NOT NORMAL NOW - So YES this RIGHT NOW and MORE! - food for those children - housing for those children - Utilities for that household - medical care for those children - WiFi for those children - PC/laptop/iPad for those children - on-line education only for all children - in-service training for teachers to be effective on-line - PPE for the parents of those children - testing weekly for the family and provider - I'm just sayin, providing child care is a small start on what our children need. Yesterday I scolded those who said people should have saved for a rainy day - that that day passed months ago and we are in a storm. So for those of you now saying the government should not pay for child care - OMG - YOU have not been living pay-check to pay-check and then til the end of unemployment and you're renting and the eviction protection was lifted on 7/24. Please tell me - where can a family find the money to pay for child care today? Please wake up to the realities the of what the greater numbers of our population are facing!
    Like (26)
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    Childcare is essential to the workforce returning to work and for parents who need to quarantine. At a time when schools may need to be virtual, this will also put additional demands upon childcare workers. The monies are needed.
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    Probably should be a ton more. That’s less for an entire sector than what Delta airlines got.
    Like (15)
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    Let's see.... Thanks Trevor Noah and the Daily Show for showing the “waste”. ..... House Bill 7027 - up to $50 Billion in Aid for Child Care ..... House Bill 7327 - up to $10 Billion in Aid for Child Care ..... WHY NOT BOTH TOGETHER!! Instead of the following waste ..... Both the House (H.R. 2500) and the Senate have passed a $740 Billion Defense Bill of which the Senate Bill 4049 includes "$9.1 billion to procure 95 F-35 Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter aircraft, including 60 F-35As, 12 F-35Bs, and 23 F-35Cs. Additionally, the Air Force would be allowed to utilize, modify, and operate six Turkish F-35s that were never delivered because of Turkey’s suspension from the F-35 program." By the way, the ENTIRE F35 program has been GROUNDED multiple times (links below) ..... these bills still needs to be negotiated between the House and Senate before sending to the Idiot. ..... Now the Senate $1 trillion coronavirus relief package includes "money for fighter jets, helicopters, radars, ships and armored vehicles that the measure’s authors have deemed “emergency” spending that is not capped by the budget control law." But Aid for Child Care seems minimal compared to the still stingy dollars allowed for school districts!!!!! ..... DON'T BOTH PARTIES WANT TO PASS A $740 BILLION DEFENSE BILL!! Why is any additional F35 spending not there. ..... Now more money for the F35 ????????????????? ..... https://www.rollcall.com/2020/07/27/pandemic-relief-package-would-become-weapons-bazaar/ ..... Just shit. F35 Grounded .... https://www.militarytimes.com/news/your-military/2018/10/11/dod-announces-global-grounding-of-all-f-35s/ .... https://www.defensenews.com/air/2019/06/12/inventory-management-failures-are-grounding-f-35-jets/ .... https://sofrep.com/fightersweep/still-grounded-luke-afb-f-35-aircraft-continue-pause-due-breathing-system-issues/ .... https://www.popularmechanics.com/military/aviation/a30718538/f-35-flaws/ .... https://www.defensenews.com/smr/hidden-troubles-f35/2020/04/24/five-f-35-issues-have-been-downgraded-but-they-remain-unsolved/
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    DO IT. IT SHOULDVE BEEN DONE ALREADY!
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    Childcare is the backbone of our economy. Quality care for our youngest citizens means they will grow up healthy and ready to learn the skills they need for the future. It also frees up parents to work and grow our economy.
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    Agree JimK.Yes, and sick pay bc people must stay home if sick or caring for sick person if no flippin hospital beds available!!
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    Congress has already allocated $3.5 billion to child care providers in the CARES Act, so this legislation is unnecessary. Child care providers that need assistance now can apply for Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) loans, which are meant to help small businesses like them remain solvent during the pandemic. This is a duplication and would be misappropriated or misused. Vote no.
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    You expect people to go to work then you need to support the programs that assist with it happening.
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    Just to keep within safety protocol for Covid-19 is expensive. And keeping qualified child care workers. Working parents need childcare services. But it takes funds to stay safe and open. This would show Mitch McConnell that folks aren’t lazy, but can’t find child care. At his age he probably forgot.
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    I should think that if the government would like people to return to work, especially women who have born the greater burden during the pandemic, and would like children to return safely to in classroom schools that this would not be a question but an essential. The economy has been structured around a two income household for a long time now. Child care has become a necessity rather than a luxury. During the pandemic the burden of child care has been placed squarely back on women along with maintaining their own incomes if at all possible and distance learning. To return to pre-pandemic conditions, Child Care must become a subsidized priority to enable a safe return to work and school. Child Care Workers deserve all the help, support, and wages they can get for the tough job they do daily.
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    Yes they are essential workers. Just make sure there isn’t a way for any of Trump’s rich friends to siphon funds out so the people that need it can’t have any.
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    👎👎House Bill H.R. 7029 AKA Child Care is Essential Act👍👍 I stand opposed to and don't recommend the passage of House bill H.R. 7029 AKA the Child Care is Essential Act, would provide $50 billion in child care funding for coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic relief. To this end, it would create a $50 billion Child Care Stabilization Fund within the existing Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) program. Congress has already allocated $3.5 billion to child care providers in the CARES Act, so this legislation is unnecessary. Child care providers that need assistance now can apply for Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) loans, which are meant to help small businesses like them remain solvent during the pandemic. Additionally, if current lockdowns continue, many families may not need child care providers outside the home — so it’s possible that child care providers won’t be required for the new normal. Q. 7.28.20. SP
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    Yes, child care providers need this assistance, and so does the country.
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    Yes provided it’s not just another way to give big bucks to churches and big business. So far trumpelthinskin can’t seem to comprehend that the largest Christian church in the world with the highest evidence of child abuse should not get our tax dollars. The Vatican can crack open that big old vault and pay their own damn way. I don’t trust this administration farther than I could pick trumps fat old ugly ass and throw it.
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    Awesome
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    LMAO! Another day, another farce out of our CONGRESS. $50 BILLION in aid to "child care providers?" You won't have to pay these people and their operations anything come September 2020! BECAUSE THE MORON DEMOCRATS won't open the SCHOOLS! So right there, any "aid" that would be paid is unnecessary. As child care providers will reap BILLIONS in revenue taking care of working people's kids. What SHOULD be done is EVERY PERSON PAYING SCHOOL TAXES in the FILTHY DEMOCRAT RUN STATES should be REEMBURSED EVERY DIME of the SCHOOL TAX PAYEMENTS they laid out for 2020.
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    These are basically essential workers. They need all the aid they can get
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