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house Bill H.R. 5176

Should Opioid Addiction Treatment Start in Emergency Rooms to Prevent Repeat Overdoses?

Argument in favor

By starting medication-assisted treatment when an opioid overdose patient is still in the emergency room, it will give them a better chance at completing their recovery and not overdosing again.

burrkitty's Opinion
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06/11/2018
So basically after they OD we take them straight from the ER into addiction treatment instead of waiting? Uhhh GOOD! Addiction is a disease. The sooner we can intervene, the better. Happy to see my taxes helping people. Universal Single Payer Healthcare next please.
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Jess's Opinion
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06/11/2018
Starting treatment at the first point of contact seems like a logical step to prevent future OD.
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Justin's Opinion
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06/11/2018
Opiates are one of the most addictive substances. The withdrawals are so brutal, they have to continue the use just to prevent going through the awful withdrawals, even after a first-time use. Eventually, they won’t be able to afford the opiates (heroin) and will turn to methamphetamine because the street value is less and the withdrawals are less intense. Why wouldn’t we try to help the people coming in to our hospitals instead of just turning them away once the narcan wears off? Besides, the hospital is most likely the cause of their addiction by prescribing opiates/narcotic analgesics after their injury anyway.
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Argument opposed

While emergency room visits because of opioid overdoses are rising, providing overdose reversal drugs and starting medicated treatment when an overdose patient leaves the ER may not help much.

Ann's Opinion
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06/11/2018
First as a retired drug counselor 30 million isn’t nearly enough to cover this. 2nd as previously said ER staff know & do this, but there will never be enough beds until pharmaceutical companies are taxed to fix their problem. 3rd as also stated, detox & treatment are only the tip of this problem; increases in mental health counseling, housing & minimum wage will also be required to truly address this problem- all issues our GOP led government refuse to address!!
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Seth's Opinion
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06/11/2018
This is a perfect example of trying to fix everything but the problem. The issue is not the overdoses, the issue is that the pharmaceutical companies have been given carte blanche to keep giving out opiates and barbiturates at the cost of American lives. It is time to tax the pharmaceutical companies more heavily, legalize cannabis at the federal level and the immediate release and expunging of records for anyone convicted of non-violent drug crimes, and moving towards a universal healthcare platform. These are the solutions to the current opiate issues.
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Rick 's Opinion
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06/11/2018
This is not going to stop or even remotely deal with the problem!!! If anything it only encourages those afflicted to go out and do it again as now they have the antidote!!!! Come on I thought you elected officials had to have some common sense and education!!!
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What is House Bill H.R. 5176?

This bill — known as the POWER Act — would aim to prevent opioid overdoses by setting up procedures for emergency rooms to discharge overdose patients with the opioid overdose antidote naloxone and Medication Assisted Treatment. The Dept. of Health and Human Services (HHS) would create a coordinated care model centered around starting Medication-Assisted Treatment in the emergency room before engaging in a “warm hand off” of the patient to a substance use disorder treatment provider. HHS would develop the model and administer $50 million grant program for healthcare providers to carry it out in 2019.

The bill’s full title is the Preventing Overdoses While in Emergency Rooms Act of 2018.

Impact

Opioid overdose patients; emergency rooms; and HHS.

Cost of House Bill H.R. 5176

$50.00 Million
The CBO estimates that enacting this bill would cost $50 million over the 2019-2023 period.

More Information

In-Depth: Sponsoring Rep. David McKinley (R-WV) introduced this bill to create a program aimed at preventing repeat opioid overdoses:

“The opioid epidemic is ravaging America, particularly rural states like West Virginia. Overdose rates are skyrocketing. Often, people who survive an overdose end up doing it again because they’re unable to access the necessary treatment. This bill would ensure these patients get the care they need in the emergency room and are then placed in the care of a substance abuse treatment provider to receive continued care, giving them a better shot at recovery.”

This legislation passed the House Energy & Commerce Committee on a voice vote and has the support of 13 bipartisan cosponsors, including eight Republicans and five Democrats. The American College of Emergency Physicians has endorsed this bill.


Of Note: A CDC report found that emergency room visits due to suspected opioid overdoses rose by about 30% from July 2016 to September 2017 across the country.


Media:

Summary by Eric Revell

(Photo Credit: JazzlRT / iStock)

AKA

Preventing Overdoses While in Emergency Rooms Act of 2018

Official Title

To require the Secretary of Health and Human Services to provide coordinated care to patients who have experienced a non-fatal overdose after emergency room discharge, and for other purposes.

bill Progress


  • Not enacted
    The President has not signed this bill
  • The senate has not voted
      senate Committees
      Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions
  • The house Passed June 12th, 2018
    Passed by Voice Vote
      house Committees
      Health
      Committee on Energy and Commerce
    IntroducedMarch 6th, 2018

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    So basically after they OD we take them straight from the ER into addiction treatment instead of waiting? Uhhh GOOD! Addiction is a disease. The sooner we can intervene, the better. Happy to see my taxes helping people. Universal Single Payer Healthcare next please.
    Like (48)
    Follow
    Share
    First as a retired drug counselor 30 million isn’t nearly enough to cover this. 2nd as previously said ER staff know & do this, but there will never be enough beds until pharmaceutical companies are taxed to fix their problem. 3rd as also stated, detox & treatment are only the tip of this problem; increases in mental health counseling, housing & minimum wage will also be required to truly address this problem- all issues our GOP led government refuse to address!!
    Like (66)
    Follow
    Share
    This is a perfect example of trying to fix everything but the problem. The issue is not the overdoses, the issue is that the pharmaceutical companies have been given carte blanche to keep giving out opiates and barbiturates at the cost of American lives. It is time to tax the pharmaceutical companies more heavily, legalize cannabis at the federal level and the immediate release and expunging of records for anyone convicted of non-violent drug crimes, and moving towards a universal healthcare platform. These are the solutions to the current opiate issues.
    Like (29)
    Follow
    Share
    This is not going to stop or even remotely deal with the problem!!! If anything it only encourages those afflicted to go out and do it again as now they have the antidote!!!! Come on I thought you elected officials had to have some common sense and education!!!
    Like (16)
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    EXCEPT, the under lying issues relating to full recovery is the challenge. It is important to save the lives of the OPIOD addicted but the return to OPIODs is almost a guarantee. Hopelessness, Poverty, mental health issues, chronic pain, drug culture, are the magic carpet to addiction. Mental health care, affordable housing, job skills training & placement and Cannabis legalization for chronic pain management is needed. Preventing an overdose and ignoring the issues is madness.
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    How about 1) the drug companies stop pushing and lying that these drugs aren’t addictive, 2) how about doctors monitor their use and only give them out for a week at time and raise the level of concern about how addictive they are when prescribing, 3) give written info to back up the verbal instructions, 4) take some personal responsibility and USE AS DIRECTED! 5) after one month, pain meds should be managed through a pain mgmt. clinic, also using alternative and complimentary treatments (e.g. meditation, massage, acupuncture, etc.). I have a somewhat addictive personality, and though I had 7 major surgeries in under 4 yrs, i was off and on opioids, but I had good docs, and took responsibility to use when I needed, not just because they made me feel good. But we must be very careful, here, because living with severe chronic pain needs to be managed...my fear is a knee-jerk reaction to this crisis, whereas those persons needing ongoing treatment are told to, “tough it out!” That should never happen.
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    Or we could just legalize cannabis.
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    This is one small expensive step that won't make enough difference by itself to resolve a complex social, healthcare systems, and political problem. A comprehensive solution could be pursued under the ACA or single-payer IF these were not constantly under attack.
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    Starting treatment at the first point of contact seems like a logical step to prevent future OD.
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    H.R. 5176 the POWER Act I’m in strong 💪 support of the House bill — H.R. 5246 AKA the POWER Act — Which would aim in preventing opioid overdoses by setting up procedures for emergency rooms to discharge overdose patients with the opioid overdose antidote naloxone and Medication Assisted Treatment. The Dept. of Health and Human Services (HHS) would create a coordinated care model centered around starting Medication-Assisted Treatment in the emergency room before engaging in a “warm hand off” of the patient to a substance use disorder treatment provider. HHS would develop the model and administer $50 million grant program for healthcare providers to carry it out in 2019. By starting medication-assisted treatment when an opioid overdose patient is still in the emergency room, it will give them a better chance at completing their recovery and not overdosing again. 6*13*18 .....
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    The ER is probably better suited for emergencies. I say we legalize cannabis and see if the overdose cases go down like what’s been reported in Colorado.
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    As a healthcare worker in a small community hospital I see approximately 50% of or ER beds occupied by patients in need of mental health services. Included in this population are non fatal drug overdoses, patients requesting detox , those with alcohol abuse disease and mental illness. There are not enough treatment centers for these patients. Some linger in the ER for days awaiting a bed anywhere. The current system isn’t working. This is a very complex problem. Treating someone who OD and discharging them back into society doesn’t work . I see the same names over and over. Another problem that needs to be addressed is alcohol poisoning. At any given time greater than 50% of inpatients are there due to the medical problems resulting from alcoholism.
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    There are few things that concern me more than law makers trying to legislate medical care. Congress needs to keep its focus on representing the will of their constituents, not the will of the GOP. That’s their job
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    First of all, this isn’t nearly enough money for the scope of the problem. Pharmaceutical companies need to be taxed at a higher rate to cover the addiction problem that they started.
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    Opiates are one of the most addictive substances. The withdrawals are so brutal, they have to continue the use just to prevent going through the awful withdrawals, even after a first-time use. Eventually, they won’t be able to afford the opiates (heroin) and will turn to methamphetamine because the street value is less and the withdrawals are less intense. Why wouldn’t we try to help the people coming in to our hospitals instead of just turning them away once the narcan wears off? Besides, the hospital is most likely the cause of their addiction by prescribing opiates/narcotic analgesics after their injury anyway.
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    Sooner intervention costs everyone less in the long term.
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    Coordinated care...is all important connected inextricably with the Naltrexone regime. That means Follow Up with appropriate linkage to Treatment facilities the person can access. Covered by Insurance one way or another.
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    It does in many cases. But, until universal healthcare is put into place, most Americans cannot afford treatment or the time off work.
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    Yes AND doctors need to understand that marijuana is a SAFER NON ADDICTIVE alternative!. I just had knee surgery- I specifically started no pain meds. Instead he switched me from one narcotic to another. NO NO NO. I use medical marijuana and have been off ALL pain medications for 4 weeks
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    An addict/alcoholic will only stop using/drinking when they are ready. Use this money for single payer healthcare and maybe these people won’t go to drugs or alcohol because they will be able to see someone for their mental health issues
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