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house Bill H.R. 4300

Should Former Foster Youth Receive Housing Vouchers for Up to 5 Years After Aging Out of the Foster Care System?

Argument in favor

Former foster youth are at an elevated risk of homelessness, poor educational attainment, and unemployment after they age out of the foster care system. In comparison with their peers, they have fewer — if any — financial and social support, which affects their ability to take care of themselves in all ways. Housing vouchers are a good way to shelter foster youth and ensure that they somewhere to live while pursuing education or employment.

Celiaann's Opinion
···
11/18/2019
Absolutely! I was stunned to learn that these kids are literally put out on the street with NO resources and no support. This bill should pass 100% and immediately put into practice. The one thing I would be cautious of would be these places to pop up suddenly and take their money to house them again. These kids need help not vultures...private agencies that this administration would back and not help. Stipulations background checks and no private agencies that would further cause trauma to this population!
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jimK's Opinion
···
11/19/2019
Everyone getting out on their own the first time needs guidance because the transition from being a ‘dependent’ to an ‘independent’ is difficult, lots if things are new from shopping, feeding themselves, securing housing, managing money and signing contracts. This is hard enough for youth with a supporting family to guide them. It must be much harder for those having to make this transition without even the chance of this parental/family support. For society, it is much more economical to help these folks get started quickly- toward a future as a self-sufficient, contributing and tax paying member of our society than it is to risk them getting lost and becoming a dependent of society. Yes, this is the right and moral thing to do, and should be cost-effective investment in our society’s future. … … … NoHedges, great insights and stats, thanks.
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Loudxintro's Opinion
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11/18/2019
YES! Our foster youth are often overlooked. We need to help them reach the potential to have the same opportunities as the rest of young adults. A foster youth approaching or aging out of the system has a 50% chance of graduating high school, an 8% of getting a 2 year college degree, and less than a 2% chance of getting a 4 year degree.
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Argument opposed

Once former foster youth reach the age of majority, they’re legally adults who should be responsible for taking care of themselves. Unless there’s a compelling reason (such as illness or disability) for the government to provide additional support, able-bodied former foster youth should be able to work to support themselves. Additionally, putting former foster youth at the front of the line for public housing risks bumping other vulnerable populations — such as domestic violence survivors and families with children — from this valuable lifeline.

NoHedges's Opinion
···
11/19/2019
🙉I would prefer to stop playing in the margins of identity politics and seek a solution that addresses both root cause and sustainability. Instead of creating a blanket solution, which sends multiple mixed messages; we should provide housing vouchers for all children up until age 25 (same as medical insurance) with a documented history of having 4 or more Adverse Childhood Experiences, and those who meet certain eligibility requirements. 🙈I can see a huge loop hole where parents turn their 16/17 year old kid over to the state so the child who is studying abroad anyway... can have a taxpayer funded 5 year housing voucher to use while attending Stanford... 🙊There is also a message being said that we, as a nation, are providing housing vouchers because of the crappy foster care system. While this might be true in the majority of the cases, it is not in all cases, nor should we as a society accept the current foster care system, or have moral justification for not improving the wellbeing of all kids in the foster care system. ⚗️However, by focusing on children with 4 or more Adverse Childhood Experiences we are tackling the root of the problem. 🎟The CDC states: Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACES) have a tremendous impact on future violence victimization and perpetration, and lifelong health and opportunity. Working together, we can help create neighborhoods, communities, and a world in which every child can thrive. 🎯Learn more about ACES here: https://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/childabuseandneglect/acestudy/index.html 🎯Get your ACES score here and learn how you can be part of the solution: https://acestoohigh.com/got-your-ace-score/ 🎯Watch a great TED talk from Nadine Burke about ACES HERE: https://www.tedmed.com/talks/show?id=293066 And see Ms. Burke NPR interview here: https://www.tedmed.com/talks/show?id=293066 🎯Take a deeper dive into international comparisons here: “Comparative Child Well-being across the OECD” https://www.oecd.org/social/family/43570328.pdf 🎯Explore the trends, correlations and predictions here: https://www.childtrends.org/publications/prevalence-adverse-childhood-experiences-nationally-state-race-ethnicity 🎯See how poverty and ACES dramatically decrease student performance on international academic proficiency tests here: https://www.turnaroundusa.org/2015-pisa-analysis/ ⁉️Why so many resources? Because from Denmark, to Canada, and France to Spain.... every single country who focused on reducing “Adverse Childhood Experiences” as their policy goal saw significant gains both economic:GDP and academic:GINI ⚗️Once focused... then we, as a nation might want to define the deliverable. Is the deliverable of a “housing voucher” good for only for 5-10% of those who meet eligibility requirements and qualify because there is limited supply of availability housing units that will accept housing vouchers? 💎Is the housing spread out (which will improve positive community mentorship/modeling) or is it more concentrated/restricted to the less favorable areas (this often having the reverse effect, diminished returns on taxpayers dollars, and a slower rate of system change). 🤯Because if our goal is simply to provide a housing voucher to a targeted at risk population (who has already learned the hard way during their childhood that life is certainly NOT FAIR); AND there are not enough available housing units to meet 55% of the demand of eligibility recipients, then we probably need to allocate more resources towards sustainable solution AND, possibly, rethink the vision/purpose. 🏅Preferably a SOLUTION less likely to send a negative message: 🔥Haha wage slave...and, to think, you thought we were actually interested in helping you. 😡No, we are just going to let everyone think we are giving you a housing voucher. In reality, it is nothing more than a worthless piece of paper. And since our current waitlists is currently over 10 years long, we have decided to close the waitlist too. (Example based on Garfield County Colorado Housing Authority: Congressional District of Scott Tipton). 🥁Important point of interest Tipton's calculated net worth increased by an average of 37% per year while suicides from farmers and ranchers in his district hit an all time high. Who says, Republicans aren’t complicit in Trump’s All American homicide.
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Kate's Opinion
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11/18/2019
Already 3 years. Don’t need additional NANNY STATE solutions
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Ronald's Opinion
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11/18/2019
Our nation is in debt. We must not borrow for this. They must get jobs, and fend for themselves. Just as adults have done since time began.
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    Absolutely! I was stunned to learn that these kids are literally put out on the street with NO resources and no support. This bill should pass 100% and immediately put into practice. The one thing I would be cautious of would be these places to pop up suddenly and take their money to house them again. These kids need help not vultures...private agencies that this administration would back and not help. Stipulations background checks and no private agencies that would further cause trauma to this population!
    Like (44)
    Follow
    Share
    🙉I would prefer to stop playing in the margins of identity politics and seek a solution that addresses both root cause and sustainability. Instead of creating a blanket solution, which sends multiple mixed messages; we should provide housing vouchers for all children up until age 25 (same as medical insurance) with a documented history of having 4 or more Adverse Childhood Experiences, and those who meet certain eligibility requirements. 🙈I can see a huge loop hole where parents turn their 16/17 year old kid over to the state so the child who is studying abroad anyway... can have a taxpayer funded 5 year housing voucher to use while attending Stanford... 🙊There is also a message being said that we, as a nation, are providing housing vouchers because of the crappy foster care system. While this might be true in the majority of the cases, it is not in all cases, nor should we as a society accept the current foster care system, or have moral justification for not improving the wellbeing of all kids in the foster care system. ⚗️However, by focusing on children with 4 or more Adverse Childhood Experiences we are tackling the root of the problem. 🎟The CDC states: Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACES) have a tremendous impact on future violence victimization and perpetration, and lifelong health and opportunity. Working together, we can help create neighborhoods, communities, and a world in which every child can thrive. 🎯Learn more about ACES here: https://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/childabuseandneglect/acestudy/index.html 🎯Get your ACES score here and learn how you can be part of the solution: https://acestoohigh.com/got-your-ace-score/ 🎯Watch a great TED talk from Nadine Burke about ACES HERE: https://www.tedmed.com/talks/show?id=293066 And see Ms. Burke NPR interview here: https://www.tedmed.com/talks/show?id=293066 🎯Take a deeper dive into international comparisons here: “Comparative Child Well-being across the OECD” https://www.oecd.org/social/family/43570328.pdf 🎯Explore the trends, correlations and predictions here: https://www.childtrends.org/publications/prevalence-adverse-childhood-experiences-nationally-state-race-ethnicity 🎯See how poverty and ACES dramatically decrease student performance on international academic proficiency tests here: https://www.turnaroundusa.org/2015-pisa-analysis/ ⁉️Why so many resources? Because from Denmark, to Canada, and France to Spain.... every single country who focused on reducing “Adverse Childhood Experiences” as their policy goal saw significant gains both economic:GDP and academic:GINI ⚗️Once focused... then we, as a nation might want to define the deliverable. Is the deliverable of a “housing voucher” good for only for 5-10% of those who meet eligibility requirements and qualify because there is limited supply of availability housing units that will accept housing vouchers? 💎Is the housing spread out (which will improve positive community mentorship/modeling) or is it more concentrated/restricted to the less favorable areas (this often having the reverse effect, diminished returns on taxpayers dollars, and a slower rate of system change). 🤯Because if our goal is simply to provide a housing voucher to a targeted at risk population (who has already learned the hard way during their childhood that life is certainly NOT FAIR); AND there are not enough available housing units to meet 55% of the demand of eligibility recipients, then we probably need to allocate more resources towards sustainable solution AND, possibly, rethink the vision/purpose. 🏅Preferably a SOLUTION less likely to send a negative message: 🔥Haha wage slave...and, to think, you thought we were actually interested in helping you. 😡No, we are just going to let everyone think we are giving you a housing voucher. In reality, it is nothing more than a worthless piece of paper. And since our current waitlists is currently over 10 years long, we have decided to close the waitlist too. (Example based on Garfield County Colorado Housing Authority: Congressional District of Scott Tipton). 🥁Important point of interest Tipton's calculated net worth increased by an average of 37% per year while suicides from farmers and ranchers in his district hit an all time high. Who says, Republicans aren’t complicit in Trump’s All American homicide.
    Like (14)
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    Everyone getting out on their own the first time needs guidance because the transition from being a ‘dependent’ to an ‘independent’ is difficult, lots if things are new from shopping, feeding themselves, securing housing, managing money and signing contracts. This is hard enough for youth with a supporting family to guide them. It must be much harder for those having to make this transition without even the chance of this parental/family support. For society, it is much more economical to help these folks get started quickly- toward a future as a self-sufficient, contributing and tax paying member of our society than it is to risk them getting lost and becoming a dependent of society. Yes, this is the right and moral thing to do, and should be cost-effective investment in our society’s future. … … … NoHedges, great insights and stats, thanks.
    Like (31)
    Follow
    Share
    YES! Our foster youth are often overlooked. We need to help them reach the potential to have the same opportunities as the rest of young adults. A foster youth approaching or aging out of the system has a 50% chance of graduating high school, an 8% of getting a 2 year college degree, and less than a 2% chance of getting a 4 year degree.
    Like (31)
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    Absolutely. If we can afford to pay 37.5 BILLION year after year to the Big Polluters oil companies, we can certainly help kids who have been screwed by an under funded system a chance to get on their feet. I worked in the system and if you knew how abusive it really is you’d throw up.
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    Youths raised in foster care are some of our most vulnerable young people, and do not benefit from the passed-down wealth or family support that other young people get. We have a severe affordable housing problem in this country, and I think giving a boost to these young people early on in adulthood might help keep them from being long-term homeless.
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    Having been fortunate to have been adapted by my foster parents, I know of others less fortunate and support this.
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    If you’ve ever had any contact with the foster system you will have an inkling of what these people go through. They need the assistance to transition. This includes psychiatric help as well in a supportive and healing system. We need to acknowledge where we fail society and redress those failings. Especially with our young people, who are the present as well as the future. Our system is only as viable and humane as our weakest members—it’s important to remember that if we want to suceed.
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    Do we really think it’s better to have these young people sleeping on the street? How many 18 year old kids can support themselves and get an education?
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    No one, young, old, male, female, citizen, alien, of any religious belief should be without food, shelter, health needs.
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    I support 5 year housing vouchers for Foster Children aging out of the system. They are at a much higher risk of homelessness, poor educational attainment, and unemployment at this age compared to their peers. They have absolutely no safety net typically, either socially or financially. Housing vouchers are a good way to shelter foster youth to ensure that they have somewhere to live while pursuing education or employment, which should be a requirement. If the child has special needs that prohibit education/employment, the vouchers should be indefinite.
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    Kids in foster care are there because of their terrible home conditions. When they age out doesn't mean they have the skills and wherewithal to suddenly live on their own. A half way home or system needs to be in place to help them transition into adulthood, learn adult responsibilities. They've already got strikes against them.
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    Just turning these children into homeless children is cruel. Get them into housing immediately.
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    Please work to find solutions for these displaced people. So much in life depends on the support you receive after graduation from high school. This is in our collective interest as these are either tax payers or receivers. Vouchers are a small hand up.
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    We must make housing easier and efficient
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    In the right circumstances
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    Already 3 years. Don’t need additional NANNY STATE solutions
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    Yes.
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    Housing vouchers are needed by kids in the foster care organization that age out but 5 years sounds excessive. The program should consider including job training, practical living skills to find housing & job placement with a goal of transitioning into jobs & group home living situations they can pay from wages. Many may be working minimum wage jobs so low-cost group housing with job training options for better jobs should also be included. Not just 5 years of vouchers as this is just delaying the day they end up on the street homeless.
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    Foster children who reach the age of majority are most often not prepared to be financially responsible. Most people who have raised change know this is true of most children and are prepared to subsidize them for several more years. That is even more true of young adults who didn’t grow up with the same advantages. Supervised half way houses that provide counseling and teach life skills would not be a bad idea either.
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