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house Bill H.R. 3823

Tax Relief for Hurricane Victims, Reauthorizing the FAA and Expiring Healthcare Programs

Argument in favor

Many Americans are suffering in the aftermath of Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria and the least the federal government can do is offer them much needed tax relief. The FAA & several healthcare programs also need reauthorizing before the end of September.

Christian 's Opinion
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09/26/2017
Of course we need all of the items listed in this bill but unfortunate that we have to group so many things in one piece of legislation. Sloppy and deceptive
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Mancos's Opinion
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09/26/2017
So typical that the FAA issue is attached to this bill. Time to pass a law that doesn't permit more than one issue in a single piece of legislation.
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tj49er's Opinion
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09/27/2017
Is there any question on this one??? YES! I agree with everyone else! Lumping so many things on bills is disingenuous and sneaky. This entire practice needs to STOP. Not only does it lump unrelated items, it makes bills so freaking long no one can possibly read the whole thing before a vote. It also makes representatives look bad when they vote yes/no because of one item in the bill. Many times their vote is taken out of context.
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Argument opposed

The main components of this bill — disaster tax relief, reauthorizing the FAA & healthcare programs, and reforming flood insurance — should be debated on their merits individually and not cobbled together as a must-pass Frankenstein bill.

Taylor's Opinion
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09/26/2017
Separate these out in to separate bills. Of course I want to help the hurricane victims but what else is hiding in this bill that they're hoping we won't notice?
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Megan's Opinion
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09/27/2017
Too much at stake on one bill. Would love to help out the hurricane victims, but this piece of legislation encompasses too much to say yes to.
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TuckerWantsLiberty's Opinion
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09/27/2017
One bill, one issue. Separate these. Yes to tax relief. No to everything else. If you vote yes to tax relief AND extending programs, you're voting to increase the debt, which inevitably means higher taxes in the future. Yes to lower taxes (in fact, make the tax relief universal and permanent), but lower spending with it.
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What is House Bill H.R. 3823?

This bill would provide temporary tax relief to the victims of Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria while also reauthorizing the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and several healthcare programs that are currently set to expire at the end of September 2017.

The following targeted tax relief would be available to the victims and communities impacted by Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria in affected states and territories:

  • Deduction for Personal Casualty Losses: The current requirement that personal casualty losses exceed 10 percent of adjusted gross income to qualify for a deduction would be eliminated, as would the requirement for taxpayers to itemize their deductions to access it.

  • Penalty-Free Access to Retirement Funds: An exception to the 10 percent early retirement plan withdrawal penalty would be granted for qualified hurricane relief distributions. Withdrawals made to purchase homes that have been cancelled because of the disasters could be re-contributed, and flexibility would be extended to loans from retirement plans for hurricane relief.

  • Encouraging Charitable Giving: Limitations on the deduction for charitable contributions would be temporarily suspended for qualified contributions related to hurricane relief before December 31, 2017.

  • Disaster-Related Employment Relief: A tax credit for 40 percent of wages (up to $6,000 per employee) paid by a disaster-affected employer to an employee  from a core disaster area would be provided.

  • Earned Income Tax Credit and Child Tax Credit: For 2017, taxpayers would be allowed to refer to earned income from the immediately preceding year for purposes of determining the Earned Income Tax Credit and Child Tax Credit.

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) would be reauthorized through March 31, 2018 with $4.99 billion in funding available for the period. Included in that funding would be $1.4 billion for air navigation facilities and equipment; $88 million for research, engineering and development; $74.7 million for the Small Community Air Service; and $4.9 million for airports not receiving sufficient service. Taxes that provide revenue to the Airport and Airway Trust Fund would also be extended through March 31, 2018.

The healthcare programs that would be reauthorized by this bill include:

  • Payments to teaching health centers with graduate medical education programs: $60 million and $15 million for the first quarter of FY2018.

  • Special Diabetes Program for Indians: $37.5 million for the first quarter of FY2018.

  • Medicare Patient Intravenuous Immune Globin (IVIG) Demonstration Project: Extended through the end of December 2020.

  • Funding for the Medicare Improvement Fund would be reduced from $270 million to $220 million during and after FY2021.

The National Flood Insurance Program would be reformed by allowing private insurance plans to be purchased and satisfy the requirement to purchase flood insurance for homes and other properties that have been identified by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) as having a flood risk.

Impact

People affected by Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria; people buying flood insurance; air travelers; the FAA; the NFIP; FEMA; and the IRS.

Cost of House Bill H.R. 3823

A CBO cost estimate is unavailable.

More Information

In-DepthSponsoring Rep. Kevin Brady (R-TX) introduced this bill to provide tax relief for people and businesses affected by Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria while also reauthorizing the FAA and certain expiring healthcare programs:

“My bill specifically helps hurricane victims keep more of their paycheck, deduct more of the cost of their expensive property damage, and have more affordable and immediate access to money they have saved for their retirement. The legislation will also encourage even more Americans to donate generously to help those in need. Taken together, these tax relief measures will help more people be able to bear the tremendous expense of recovering from these destructive hurricanes.”

Lead cosponsor Carlos Curbelo (R-FL) added:

“Over the last two weeks, I have been on the ground in the Florida Keys and South Dade helping our neighbors rebuild their lives while learning more about what they need to make this process easier. By providing American businesses in the affected areas with a tax credit for wages, we can get these communities back to work as soon as possible. The bill will also ensure hurricane victims keep more of their paycheck, deduct more of the costs from the extensive property damage, and immediate access – without penalties – to their retirement savings for initial recovery.  Lastly, it would temporarily suspend limitations on charitable donations to hurricane recovery efforts, further incentivizing private sector support.”

House Democrats blocked this bill when it was voted on by the House under suspension of the rules — a process that fast-tracks debate for relatively uncontroversial bills that get the backing of at least two-thirds of all members voting. They withheld their support because congressional Republicans haven’t yet allowed a vote on the Dream Act, and also because of concerns about the sufficiency of the disaster relief and allowing private flood insurance plans. House Minority Whip Steny Hoyer (D-MD) said:

“While many of us could support these proposals as part of an overall package that is balanced, we should not acquiesce in this one-sided process that omits Democratic priorities key to advancing the work of making opportunity more broadly available to the American people.”

This legislation has the support of two cosponsors, both of whom are Republicans.


Media:

Summary by Eric Revell

(Photo Credit: Karl Spencer / iStock)

AKA

Disaster Tax Relief and Airport and Airway Extension Act of 2017

Official Title

To amend title 49, United States Code, to extend authorizations for the airport improvement program, to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to extend the funding and expenditure authority of the Airport and Airway Trust Fund, to provide disaster tax relief, and for other purposes.

bill Progress


  • EnactedSeptember 29th, 2017
    The President signed this bill into law
  • The senate Passed September 28th, 2017
    Passed by Voice Vote
  • The house Passed September 28th, 2017
    Roll Call Vote 264 Yea / 155 Nay
      house Committees
      Committee on Financial Services
      Committee on the Budget
      Committee on Energy and Commerce
      Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure
      Committee on Ways and Means
    IntroducedSeptember 25th, 2017

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    Of course we need all of the items listed in this bill but unfortunate that we have to group so many things in one piece of legislation. Sloppy and deceptive
    Like (79)
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    Separate these out in to separate bills. Of course I want to help the hurricane victims but what else is hiding in this bill that they're hoping we won't notice?
    Like (106)
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    Share
    Too much at stake on one bill. Would love to help out the hurricane victims, but this piece of legislation encompasses too much to say yes to.
    Like (38)
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    One bill, one issue. Separate these. Yes to tax relief. No to everything else. If you vote yes to tax relief AND extending programs, you're voting to increase the debt, which inevitably means higher taxes in the future. Yes to lower taxes (in fact, make the tax relief universal and permanent), but lower spending with it.
    Like (30)
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    So typical that the FAA issue is attached to this bill. Time to pass a law that doesn't permit more than one issue in a single piece of legislation.
    Like (22)
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    Time to stop! Let's take a vote one by one, then riders put into these bills will be exposed. Let's talk about how Trump is holding up the help for American citizens to pass this bill! People will die because he wants to play games. If Moore gets elected senator I would retire.
    Like (12)
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    Whether items are hidden in bills or not, they should have their own Bill. Items cannot ride the coattails of other items that are most likely to get approved.
    Like (11)
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    Is there any question on this one??? YES! I agree with everyone else! Lumping so many things on bills is disingenuous and sneaky. This entire practice needs to STOP. Not only does it lump unrelated items, it makes bills so freaking long no one can possibly read the whole thing before a vote. It also makes representatives look bad when they vote yes/no because of one item in the bill. Many times their vote is taken out of context.
    Like (10)
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    This bill has too many things included in it. Vote on each issue separately. Yes we want to help victims of the hurricanes, but I also see a reduction to Medicare. Our population is growing, we need to increase Medicare, not reduce it.
    Like (6)
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    I want to help everyone affected by the hurricanes. But there are too many items in this bill. Seems suspect. Separate them out to vote on individual items.
    Like (4)
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    I don't trust congress. Therefore I prefer each issue be debated and agreed upon separately. Americans didn't cause this anti-government sentiment. Some elected officials make me feel like voting for CHIMPS next election cycle. Hey... GREAT IDEA! And THEY would probably do a better job!
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    According to the article in the Washington Examiner listed above, this bill EXCLUDES disaster funding for the U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico. Relief in the form of tax deductions and credits does not equally address the needs of everyone recovering from hurricane damage and since Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands don't participate in the federal personal income tax system where this relief comes from (they have their own tax system) they receive nothing from this bill even though they are American citizens. Please vote no.
    Like (4)
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    These issues are not related and should not be lumped together.
    Like (4)
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    each bill should be submitted and voted on independently, if cannot stand the light
    Like (4)
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    All of the issues stated in this bill are important. They deserve individual consideration since they involve different agencies. By all means, we must help Americans who have been adversely affected by the hurricanes and storms. It must be done thoughtfully, and with specific intent.
    Like (3)
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    Typically I would say yes to the disaster relief, but because of all the other add-ons to this bill that involve tax breaks and healthcare changes, no.
    Like (3)
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    Need more info Completely unrelated items in same bill Smells fishy
    Like (3)
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    I am very weary of "aid bills" that disguise other issues. An aid bill is strictly for aid and should be passed as such with no attached different issues or "pork". We pay Congress a lot of money and benefits to sit on their duffs and whine that it would be quicker and more advantageous (to whom?) to ramrod as many issues in a piece of legislation as possible? As we have seen in the past, this attitude is not only disingenuous, but lazy. Get moving.
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    They're combining these to meet a hidden agenda. Separate them so hurricane tax relief is handled separately from
    Like (3)
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    No. these are needed, debate and vote on them individually. It is an absolute joke to attempt to compile such unrelated renewals into one bill.
    Like (2)
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