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house Bill H.R. 3789

Should the CDC & the President’s Sports Council Conduct a Study on Deaths Related to High School Football?

Argument in favor

It would be wise for the CDC and the President’s Council on Fitness, Sports & Nutrition to study deaths related to high school football and make recommendations to prevent and treat such severe injuries.

Steven's Opinion
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09/29/2017
It isn't just a matter of poor techinque on the part of the players; it's the limitations of the protective equipment to completely shield players from lasting brain injury, even if the game is played correctly. This is something that should be made very well known to parents, so that fully informed decisions can be made about whether their children should play football. The risk isn't small.
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Anna's Opinion
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09/29/2017
Research is the first step to finding measures that better protect our children. Our children are worth this investment.
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Matthew's Opinion
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09/29/2017
One need only to look at any 5A or 6A program in Texas to find examples of coaches’ negligence swept under the rug in order to keep winning games. Disgraceful.
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Argument opposed

There’s little to be gained by the CDC and President’s Council on FItness, Sports & Nutrition studying deaths in high school football. It’s a violent sport that’s dangerous if players use poor technique.

wsdraperv's Opinion
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09/29/2017
No. Football has risk. Everyone knows it. There's no point in spending scarce taxpayer $ on a "study" which will conclude just that. The CDC should stick with what it knows, Zombie Apocalypse.
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Vanessa's Opinion
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09/29/2017
President's counsel on health and nutrition will investigate.... didn't they just get rid of healthy lunches? This research should be above board, no one will believe the data and parents need answers.
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Ronda 's Opinion
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09/29/2017
We already know that concussions cause long term damage. It would be better to spend the money on educating the public on the very real danger of seemingly minor head injuries.
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What is House Bill H.R. 3789?

This bill would require a study be conducted on the causes of deaths related to high school football and make recommendations to prevent such deaths. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (through the direction of the Secretary of Health & Human Services), the Secretary of Education, and the President’s Council on Fitness, Sports, and Nutrition would conduct the study and gather input from organizations representing football coaches, athletic trainers, parents, and healthcare professionals.

The study would be completed within one year of this bill’s enactment and include the following:

  • A comprehensive review of research conducted on deaths in high school football;

  • An evaluation of the causes of deaths related to high school football;

  • Recommendations on actions that can be taken by schools, coaches, trainers, and governmental entities to prevent such deaths from occurring in the future. They would also recommend medical treatment protocols to treat related injuries when they occur and ways technology and data analytics can be used to prevent serious injury and death.

Impact

High school football players; trainers, coaches, and parents; the CDC; and the President’s Council on Fitness, Sports & Nutrition.

Cost of House Bill H.R. 3789

A CBO cost estimate is unavailable.

More Information

In-Depth: Sponsoring Rep. Cedric Richmond (D-LA) re-introduced this legislation after originally proposing it in 2015 to require the CDC and President’s Council on Fitness, Sports & Nutrition to study high school football related deaths:

“Our children are our greatest national treasure, and protecting them is paramount in our work in Congress. It is our responsibility to ensure that we leave no stone unturned to make the game as safe as possible for young people and prevent these tragedies from happening in the future. Moving forward, I hope this legislation will start that process and begin a national conversation about how to better protect youth in football.”

Lead cosponsor Ralph Abraham (R-LA) added:

“My district felt the terrible effect of one of these tragedies just this year. This bill will seek the root causes of such incidents so that we can better protect our children while preserving the game we love. Saving the lives of our children is a worthy cause to pursue, and I commend Rep. Richmond and Rep. Rush for their leadership on this issue.”

This legislation has the support of 12 bipartisan cosponsors, including nine Democrats and three Republicans.


Of Note: Between 2005 and 2014, two dozen high school football players died from traumatic brain and spinal cord injuries, an improvement compared to 1965-1974 when about four times that number died.


Media:

Summary by Eric Revell

(Photo Credit: maunger / iStock)

AKA

High School Football Safety Study Act

Official Title

To direct the Secretary of Health and Human Services, acting through the Director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and in consultation with the Secretary of Education and the President's Council on Fitness, Sports, and Nutrition, to conduct a study on the causes of deaths related to high school football and formulate recommendations to prevent such deaths.

bill Progress


  • Not enacted
    The President has not signed this bill
  • The senate has not voted
  • The house has not voted
      house Committees
      Committee on Education and Labor
      Committee on Energy and Commerce
      Health
    IntroducedSeptember 14th, 2017
    It isn't just a matter of poor techinque on the part of the players; it's the limitations of the protective equipment to completely shield players from lasting brain injury, even if the game is played correctly. This is something that should be made very well known to parents, so that fully informed decisions can be made about whether their children should play football. The risk isn't small.
    Like (78)
    Follow
    Share
    No. Football has risk. Everyone knows it. There's no point in spending scarce taxpayer $ on a "study" which will conclude just that. The CDC should stick with what it knows, Zombie Apocalypse.
    Like (47)
    Follow
    Share
    Research is the first step to finding measures that better protect our children. Our children are worth this investment.
    Like (49)
    Follow
    Share
    One need only to look at any 5A or 6A program in Texas to find examples of coaches’ negligence swept under the rug in order to keep winning games. Disgraceful.
    Like (26)
    Follow
    Share
    President's counsel on health and nutrition will investigate.... didn't they just get rid of healthy lunches? This research should be above board, no one will believe the data and parents need answers.
    Like (26)
    Follow
    Share
    We already know that concussions cause long term damage. It would be better to spend the money on educating the public on the very real danger of seemingly minor head injuries.
    Like (18)
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    Share
    If this were a real study, without an agenda to somehow enrich the corrupt White House and Cabinet, yes, absolutely! There is so much pressure on so many kids to play football. Parents need to know what the risks of what they are pushing are. I was friends with a very famous football player whose irritability was terrifying. Only after my own concussion with unwarranted rage did I realize why small things enraged him. Traumatic Brain Injury. People of color often could only look to sports for a way to make real money and nobody should have to suffer brain injury unknowingly.
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    Don't waste tax-payer money on this. Anybody in any sport knows the potential risk. Best recommendation, parents should chose to have their children play a safer sport.
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    CDC & High School Football. I spent over 6 years working with GAO, Brain Injury Assoc., Leavenworth brain study recognizing 8 year olds were at risk with Pee Wee Footballer and a support group of 2 dozen persons with brain injury from football. With latest CTE studies, NFL must come to same conclusion that high school and college football MUST see
    Like (11)
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    Let's do everything to protect kids!!! They are the future!!
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    These are our children.
    Like (7)
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    Children aren't in school to get killed. They aren't in school for sports. They are there for a future. We owe them a modicum of safety
    Like (6)
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    Millions of American boys and young men in America have played football since time can remember! I did! Did I get my bell rung? Once! More twisted sprained ankles than anything and got the wind knocked out of mea couple of times! I was born in the late1950s and raised in the 60s and 70s. Our parents demanded toughness as we are Americans and that is that! Football not Baseball is America's true national pass time! All real Americans love tough sport and strong competition. We honor those who excel for that is our way! We cannot and will not tolerate a looser or a coward! People get hurt! Way more people killed and maimed in car accidents and on foreign battlefields then men coming down with brain diseases from football! Oh Yeah! I forgot to tell all of you that while serving in the army we also played a lot of sports! We played full contact football with NO pads or helmets! Called Combat Football! Yes I participated! Got banged up! Licked my wounds and went back for more! That's what being an American Man is all about! Yes!!!!!
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    Yes, I think they should because if you play the sport with sportsmanship you probably would not get hurt. But we have become overly aggressive in sports where only winning counts. Coaches lose jobs if they don't win. So players are taught how to take out an opponent. Winning is all that counts, no matter what it takes. From High School to NFL. Maybe we should go to Flag Football 🏈.
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    When I was growing up I always enjoyed playing football during PE and with my friends. We never used helmets or any other kind of protection. Fortunately nobody got injured, but we did get very ruff and I did get my bell rung a few times. I do endorse the idea of making a study about Football and the effects that it has on our youth.
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    I agree there should be additional research on the impact to our children. I somehow doubt this will occur under this administration, however. So far this administration has shown very little interest in anyone except the richest Americans.
    Like (4)
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    Parents know the risk. We all know the risk. Why?
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    There is nothing worse than losing a child. If there is something that can be done to prevent it, then the research is worth it.
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    Money would be better spent on this than that useless wall. Ditch the wall, protect our kids.
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    Absolutely, it's been proven that young athletes playing full contact football have less cognitive ability,not to mention the dangers that go w/concussions. They should also add soccer to this as young girls playing soccer are at a higher risk of neck injuries & hairline fractures. Ask any physician the 1st concussion can take up to a year to heal, the second concussion before the first one has healed can cause death. The statistics from Pop Warner are skewed in favor of the league not the safety of your child. Same with soccer. Unfortunately the ego of the parent sometimes outweighs the safety for the child.
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