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house Bill H.R. 3691

Should TSA Signs be Accessible to Passengers Who Don’t Speak English or Have Impaired Vision or Hearing?

Argument in favor

Air travel is already stressful enough without language, visual, or hearing impairments getting in travelers’ ways. While many realities of air travel can’t be helped, TSA can make it slightly less stressful by making its signage accessible to everyone.

burrkitty's Opinion
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09/26/2019
I don’t see why not. I travel a lot and in other countries the signage is frequently in 5 or 6 languages plus the local language. Mandarin, English, Spanish, French, Hindi-Urdu, Bengali, and Arabic and you’ve covered a lot of the people on earth. Remember America is the oddball with it being commonplace to only speak one language. Most places 2 or 3 is common. Some places kids learn up to 6 just from multi-culture exposure. Two-thirds of the world's population share only 12 native languages. So it’s not hard.
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Em's Opinion
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09/26/2019
We have seen time and time again that if it isn't required, companies won't do it. Please support this requirement that signage, audio, video, etc. be accessible to disabled people and non-English speakers. If we don't require it, it will not be done voluntarily, and disadvantaged people will continue to be excluded, denied access, and discriminated against.
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Ian's Opinion
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09/26/2019
Yes. I believe part of the answer of this question falls under the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990
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Argument opposed

This bill isn’t necessary because the TSA is already implementing plans to make its signage accessible to those with vision and hearing impairments and non-English speakers.

Doug's Opinion
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09/26/2019
Mandating this requirement would effectively mean this information would have to be translated in to every language on the planet. There is technology available today that will allow folks to translate these items on their own.
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Bob's Opinion
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09/26/2019
Rather than improving its signage and accessibility, the TSA should be abolished.
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David's Opinion
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09/26/2019
So is this what representatives do? Find out what new policies are already being implemented and the create a law saying to do that so they can go back to their districts a have something to show for their time in office. Quit messing around and fix our immigration system and trade agreements.
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What is House Bill H.R. 3691?

This bill — the TRANSLATE Act — would require the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) to make security information more accessible to non-English speaking passengers and those with vision or hearing impairments. This would entail making signage, video, audio, and online content more accessible to non-English speaking travelers at major airports.

A plan for achieving this goal would be required within a year of this bill’s passage. The Government Accountability Office (GAO) would be required to report on this bill’s implementation.

This bill’s full title is the TSA Reaching Across Nationalities, Societies, and Languages to Advance Traveler Education Act.

Impact

Air travelers with limited English proficiency; air travelers with vision impairments; air travelers with hearing impairments; TSA; TSA signage; policies to make TSA signage access to those with limited English proficiency, vision impairments, or hearing impairments; and the GAO.

Cost of House Bill H.R. 3691

$0.00
The CBO estimates that implementing this bill wouldn’t have any significant costs, as the TSA says most of the requirements in this bill are already being planned and implemented.

More Information

In-DepthRep. Dina Titus (D-NV) introduced this bill to make air travel easier for non-English speakers, international travelers, and people with vision or hearing impairments

“You shouldn’t have to worry about missing a flight just because you don’t speak English. Making signs at airports easier to understand for non-English speakers and those with vision impairments is common sense. Las Vegas is an international city that thrives on tourism and we must make sure that our airport is comfortable for all residents and visitors alike.”  

According to the TSA, the agency is “committed to making its electronic and information technologies accessible to individuals with disabilities by meeting or exceeding the requirements of Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act.” Section 508 is a federal law that requires agencies to provide individuals with disabilities the same access to electronic information and data as those without disabilities, unless doing so would impose an undue burden upon the agency.

This legislation passed the House Homeland Security Committee with the support of one cosponsor, Rep. Van Taylor (R-TX).


Of NoteThe TSA screens over 2.2 million passengers and crew members every day. This includes passengers and crew on international flights traveling to and from 270 foreign airports and 100 countries on a daily basis. Tourism travel to the U.S. is an important part of the economy. On an annual basis, tourism supports 15.7 million jobs and accounts for $1.1 trillion of travel spending. Additionally, the aviation industry contributes 5% to the U.S. GDP. 

The U.S. Census Bureau estimates that approximately 65.3 million people above the age of five who live in the U.S. speak English “not well” or “not well at all.”


Media:

Summary by Lorelei Yang

(Photo Credit: iStockphoto.com / David Tran)

AKA

TRANSLATE Act

Official Title

To require the TSA to develop a plan to ensure that TSA material disseminated in major airports can be better understood by more people accessing such airports, and for other purposes.

bill Progress


  • Not enacted
    The President has not signed this bill
  • The senate has not voted
      senate Committees
      Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation
  • The house has not voted
      house Committees
      Committee on Homeland Security
    IntroducedJuly 10th, 2019
    I don’t see why not. I travel a lot and in other countries the signage is frequently in 5 or 6 languages plus the local language. Mandarin, English, Spanish, French, Hindi-Urdu, Bengali, and Arabic and you’ve covered a lot of the people on earth. Remember America is the oddball with it being commonplace to only speak one language. Most places 2 or 3 is common. Some places kids learn up to 6 just from multi-culture exposure. Two-thirds of the world's population share only 12 native languages. So it’s not hard.
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    This bill is not necessary.
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    We have seen time and time again that if it isn't required, companies won't do it. Please support this requirement that signage, audio, video, etc. be accessible to disabled people and non-English speakers. If we don't require it, it will not be done voluntarily, and disadvantaged people will continue to be excluded, denied access, and discriminated against.
    Like (5)
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    Yes. I believe part of the answer of this question falls under the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990
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    Mandating this requirement would effectively mean this information would have to be translated in to every language on the planet. There is technology available today that will allow folks to translate these items on their own.
    Like (3)
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    Air travel is already stressful enough without language, visual, or hearing impairments getting in travelers’ ways. While many realities of air travel can’t be helped, TSA can make it slightly less stressful by making its signage accessible to everyone.
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    Rather than improving its signage and accessibility, the TSA should be abolished.
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    I mean, it allows others to understand it, so I don’t see why not. There’s no negative impacts I see that this legislation could cause.
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    Give me info to be a yea...
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    Why isn’t this already done? I forgot, we (the United States) are so arrogant we think everyone has to adjust and accommodate to our standards. Others individual language and signage needs don’t count.
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    Obviously those signs need to be easily read by everyone including the disabled.
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    Of course! They are usually rude and treat most passengers as herds of cattle so any sign that makes life traveling better go for it! I won’t be traveling anymore because of the TSA actions!!
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    Abolish TSA no need for signs
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    Yes! TSA signs should be accessible by the visually impaired! It’s absurd that this needs legislation. Doesn’t the ADA cover this?
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    This has to be one of the dumbest questions possible. Is this a sign of our TSA intelligence?
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    Again? Why is legislation required for signs? Yes of course they should but why is common sense ignored. Maybe if fewer bills were introduced and a sense of altruism were encouraged. Yes, I am a delusional idealist
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    Of course, otherwise they violate the Americans with Disabilities Act!
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    This is common sense.
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    This bill would require the TSAs to have materials in various languages so that travelers who do not speak English can be told what the various actions that TSAs are asking them to do mean and the reasons for them! To see the info on a bill not given on this page, click on bottom left side in blue "Full text of bill."
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    Again with the no brained question of course they should provide those signs
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