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house Bill H.R. 291

W21

    CALIFORNIA HAS A WATER PROBLEM AND NOW IT LOOKS LIKE THEY ARE TRYING TO SHIFT THE BURDEN OF RESPONSIBILITY ONTO THE REST OF THE NATION. TYPICAL OF THE DEMOCOMMIE MINDSET! H.R. 291 - Water in the 21st Century Act or W21 Text of bill (67 pages): https://www.congress.gov/114/bills/hr291/BILLS-114hr291ih.pdf This bill establishes within the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) a WaterSense program to identify, label, and promote water efficient products, buildings, landscapes, facilities, processes, and services. [FEDERAL GOVERNMENT OVERREACH!] This bill establishes a program to provide financial incentives for consumers to purchase and install products, buildings, landscapes, facilities, processes, and services labeled under the WaterSense program. [IOW, THEY WANT TO GIVE YOU BACK SOME OF THE MONEY YOU PAID IN TAXES IF YOU BUY THE PRODUCTS THEY WANT YOU TO BUY. SOUNDS LIKE BRIBERY TO ME!] The EPA is required to make grants to owners or operators of water systems to address any ongoing or forecasted impact of climate change on a region's water quality or quantity. [NO, NO, AND NO!] The Department of the Interior may: (1) provide financial assistance to water projects in specified states, including projects for water recycling, water infrastructure, enhanced energy efficiency, desalination, and water storage and conveyance; and (2) transfer to nonfederal entities title to any reclamation projects or facility in need of rehabilitation that are authorized before enactment of this Act. [KEEP PART 2 (as long as the "non-federal entities" are the states) AND SCRAP PART 1.] The U.S. Geological Survey must establish an open water data system to advance the availability, timely distribution, and widespread use of water data and information for water management, education, research, assessment, and monitoring purposes. This bill reauthorizes through FY2020 the Water Desalination Act of 1996 and water resources research and technology institutes under the Water Resources Research Act of 1984. After receiving a request from a nonfederal sponsor, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers must review the operation of a reservoir and, if appropriate, update the water control manual to incorporate improved weather and runoff forecasting methods. The EPA is required to develop voluntary national drought resilience guidelines relating to preparedness planning and investments for water users and providers. [IF THE GUIDELINES ARE TO BE VOLUNTARY, WHY DO YOU WANT TO MAKE IT MANDATORY FOR THE EPA TO DEVELOP THEM?! STATES ARE MORE CAPABLE OF DEVELOPING GUIDELINES THAT FIT THEIR OWN NEEDS.] The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service must prepare a salmon drought plan for California. [NO, CALIFORNIA NEEDS TO TAKE RESPONSIBILITY FOR THEIR OWN DROUGHT PLAN!] https://www.congress.gov/bill/114th-congress/house-bill/291 [The following article was published two years ago.] Nestlé's California Water Permit Expired 27 Years Ago By Zoë Schlanger On 4/13/15 at 2:40 PM Last month, California newspaper The Desert Sun published an investigation revealing that Nestlé Water’s permit to transport water across the San Bernardino National Forest for bottling has been expired since 1988. On Friday, the U.S. Forest Service announced it would make it “a priority” to reassess the permit, and that it might impose as-of-yet unspecified “interim conditions” on the bottling operation in light of the severe drought, The Desert Sun reports. http://www.desertsun.com/story/news/2015/03/05/bottling-water-california-drought/24389417/ The fact that Nestlé has continued its massive water-bottling operation while the state struggles with crippling water shortages has become a sticking point for activists. A petition demanding Nestlé immediately stop bottling and profiting off California water has drawn 27,000 online signatures and counting, and last month activists reportedly blocked the entrances to Nestlé’s bottling plant in Sacramento. http://www.alternet.org/environment/activists-shut-down-nestle-water-bottling-plant-sacramento Another investigation published last year by The Desert Sun found that after 2009, Nestlé Waters stopped submitting annual reports to local water districts about how much groundwater the company extracted for bottling. Since then, the local San Gorgonio Pass Water Agency has listed “a rounded estimate” in its own reports of 750 acre-feet, or 244 million gallons of water, extracted by Nestlé per year, according to the Sun. Reuters reports the company drew 50 million gallons from the Sacramento area alone last year. http://www.desertsun.com/story/news/environment/2014/07/12/nestle-arrowhead-tapping-water/12589267/ http://blogs.reuters.com/breakingviews/2015/04/02/nestle-wades-into-purest-form-of-water-risk/ No state agency is tracking exactly how much water is used by the 108 private water-bottling plants in California (of which Nestlé operates five), according to the Sun. Although Nestlé submits reports on its water usage to the Forest Service, the Service has not been closely tracking the volume of water leaving the San Bernardino National Forest, or the way the extraction impacts the environment, the Sun writes. https://medium.com/@NestleWatersNA/we-will-do-our-part-to-sustain-california-s-water-supply-b6399254d62f In response to the online petition, Nestlé Waters North America issued a statement saying that it used 705 million gallons of water last year, which the company says is about the same amount of water needed to irrigate two golf courses. “While responsible management is expected and essential, bottled water is such a small user that to focus on our industry as a material concern in water policy debates is misguided,” the statement read. The latest Sun investigation also notes that the California Forest Service has never monitored the impacts of the bottled water business on streams in two watersheds that Nestlé draws from, which supply water to sensitive wildlife habitats. The Forest Service now says it plans to carry out an environmental analysis of the operations. “Now that it has been brought to my attention that the Nestlé permit has been expired for so long, on top of the drought ... it has gone to the top of the pile in terms of a program of work for our folks to work on,” San Bernardino National Forest Supervisor Jody Noiron told the Sun. Renewing Nestlé’s permit could take up to 18 months, or more than two years, according to Noiron. Nestlé says its bottling of spring water from the national forest isn't causing environmental harm, and that it manages its water use for sustainability. A spokesperson told the Sun that the company plans to work with the Forest Service to facilitate the permit renewal. http://www.newsweek.com/nestles-california-water-permit-expired-27-years-ago-321940 Congress.gov
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    Just build some dams, catch the water, divert it to cities, use it to make electricity too. We have plenty of water. Just let us use it.
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    The democrats in California are trying shift the responsibility for water infrastructure to the federal government. I live in California and Browns train is taking precedence over everything including safety. California wants to sucede from the union and a sanctuary state? Forget it. This is a great state and the democrats are running it into the ground.
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    California should fix their own problem.
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    We have to make sure people don't do things that will hurt people like MICHIGAN. there are big problems there people still don't have clean water and we all sure pay pretty hefty water bills and expect it to be safe!
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    Epic droughts are happening all over the world. It could come to your community next. Let's all get ready.
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    The USA already has way too many old and non-functioning damns clogging our rivers and destroying wilderness.
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    Clean water = healthy people. We must do everything we can to protect our waters and promote real science, historical records and be considerate of the generations to come
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    We do not have ample fresh water, we need to protect what we have.
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    The plan is reasonable and it includes the costs involved and how much money congress will appropriate.
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    Yes
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    Yes!!!!!!
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    Yes. This is long term planning.
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    Clean water is life!
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    Build more dams and catch the rain water! California is letting all the rainwater run off into the ocean! That's their own dumb fault for not building the right infrastructure!
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