Like Causes?

Install the App
TRY NOW

house Bill H.R. 2805

Do the Feds Need to Provide Grants to Enhance Awareness About Heroin and Prescription Drug Abuse?

Argument in favor

Heroin and prescription drug abuse is becoming an epidemic in the U.S., and Congress should do whatever it can to counteract and reverse that trend by empowering states and expanding treatment.

Randall's Opinion
···
09/04/2015
The "war" on drugs has been going on since I first got to vote. It is time that we figure out that we can't stop drug crises by interdiction. If there is demand the drug dealers will meet it. The only solution is to decrease demand through education, drug treatment, and changing the rules for prescribing pain medication. I've been prescribed OxyContin twice and ended up turning it in at the drug gather at the end of the year twice. I think we as a society grossly over prescribe pain medications.
Like (10)
Follow
Share
Jake's Opinion
···
12/05/2015
Exhibit A: Ohio. Heroin and opioid abuse is no longer stigmatized to 'junkies' it is in high schools, colleges, and professional environments. Low, middle, and upper classes. Cheap and plentiful. It's time to make this issue not so taboo and start a dialogue for a course of action.
Like (2)
Follow
Share
kim817's Opinion
···
09/28/2015
These drugs are dangerous. Drugs destroy families. The oxycodones came out in the 90s and everyone was taking them. Someone may broke a leg and they prescribed oxies. People liked the way they made them feel so they would ask doctors for more. Eventually they would get cut off my their doctors and had no idea how to function without opiates. Then they buy them on the streets. They got expensive so a lot of people went down the heroin trail. Then that's it. Spiralling down and down. They should be able to get treatment without being judged.
Like (2)
Follow
Share

Argument opposed

While prescription opioids will remain a problem whether this bill becomes a law or not, more needs to be done to stop the flow of heroin into the U.S. This bill doesn’t address that aspect of the crisis.

David's Opinion
···
08/29/2015
Only people living in caves do not know that heroin and prescription opiates are a problem. Federal funds should be directed to either more/better treatment or improving America's crumbling infrastructure.
Like (6)
Follow
Share
Lynda's Opinion
···
05/15/2016
The war on drugs is a failure and they have chosen a new target it is time to to stop all of this and the government spending more money that will only end up being a waste for everyone. Focus on preventing China's lethal Fentanyl coming over our borders would be better money spent. Let people take personal responsibility for their actions the government wasn't put in place to control every move a person makes or be a second parent of those they feel should be controlled at the loss of everyone else's freedoms and stop the discrimination of the wrong people. Prejudice is defined as a "preconceived opinion that is not based on reason or actual experience." It is prejudging someone or something in an unfavorable manor. Prejudice involves forming an opinion before becoming aware of relevant facts associated with someone or something. Prejudice in any form is wrong, unethical and has resulted in harm, injury and even death. This cannot be more true than in the case of chronic pain patients who require long-term opioid therapy and our current health care system. Chronic pain patients are routinely treated with the utmost degradation, shame, and humiliation in just about every emergency room in this country, as the vast majority of ER doctors and nurses assume chronic pain patients as "addicts" in search of a "fix"even when presenting with medical issues unrelated to pain. Some chronic pain patients seek emergency care due to the severe pain associated with flare-ups or complications that often accompanies their chronic ailments, while others seek emergency care due to acute injuries or illnesses not related with the disease, syndrome or permanent injury which causes their chronic pain. As soon as a chronic pain patient identifies their ailments and the opioid medication(s) they're taking, if any, the vast majority of ER doctors and nurses immediately change their demeanor. They're no longer concerned about adequately treating the patient. They're more concerned with getting that patient out of their ER, so that they don't have to deal with another "drug addict." This type of treatment has caused harm, permanent physical damage, further complications, needless suffering, and sometimes death! Barbara Dawson, a 57 year old lady, lost her life in the parking lot right outside a Florida ER, while handcuffed and in custody of police, after seeking treatment for breathing problems and stomach pain at her local ER in Blountstown, Florida. She had been in that ER a few other times within those past few months complaining of the same problems - breathing problems and abdominal pain. The ER doctors and nurses assumed Ms. Dawson as a "difficult patient" and a possible "drug seeker." You see, Barbara had been a patient a few times in the past in that same ER and suffered the prejudice associated with having a chronic illness which causes pain. Ms. Dawson, scared, vulnerable and at the mercy of those who are supposed to treat their patients with compassion, was on the receiving end of this prejudice. So extreme in their prejudice they refused to see or hear what she was desperately tried to tell the doctors and nurses the night she died frightened in hand cuffs in a hospital parking lot. As the medical staff ignored her pleas and coldly discharged her from their care, she knew something was wrong with her health that was outside the current chronic ailments she suffered from. Nurses cut the cord to her oxygen tube while listening to her cry, beg and plead for help! They then proceeded to call the police because she refused to leave. She was determined to find out what was wrong with her she knew her life was in danger. Because of her refusal to leave, she was handcuffed, dragged out of the ER, all while begging for medical intervention for breathing difficulties and abdominal pain. This vile treatment on behalf of those within that medical community which treated Barbara, those who were supposed to show the utmost compassion and care when treating this ill patient, cost this 57 year old lady her life. She died of a pulmonary embolism. How many Barbaras have there been? How many more that we aren't aware of? How many have lost their lives because of the prejudice associated with having a benign, yet incurable disease, syndrome or inoperable permanent injury which causes chronic pain and requires long-term opioid therapy? If we continue to allow this prejudice against those with chronic pain, who require prescription opioids to function, live and have some quality of life, there will be many more Barbaras who will loose their lives. On behalf of all the Barbara's out there don't let her death be in vain please step in and end the prejudice associated with being a chronic pain patient who relies on long-term opioid therapy. Prejudice should never be allowed, especially when it comes to our health care system. Too many lives are at stake for this to be ignored.
Like (3)
Follow
Share
Gwenyth's Opinion
···
09/22/2015
Thanks to all the bs about medications like antibiotics and painkillers it isn't easy to get either even when one really needs them. Medicaid shouldn't get billed repeatedly for the same thing because the first dr refused to help. No one should have order drugs from outside the country or travel outside the country just to get medication their insurance covers. I've actually had medical staff accuse me of drug seeking when I did not ask for pain killers and did not complain about pain. I was totally thrown by her statement and still have no idea where that came from. Unless of course she was talking about antibiotics which I obtained later elsewhere.
Like (3)
Follow
Share
    The "war" on drugs has been going on since I first got to vote. It is time that we figure out that we can't stop drug crises by interdiction. If there is demand the drug dealers will meet it. The only solution is to decrease demand through education, drug treatment, and changing the rules for prescribing pain medication. I've been prescribed OxyContin twice and ended up turning it in at the drug gather at the end of the year twice. I think we as a society grossly over prescribe pain medications.
    Like (10)
    Follow
    Share
    Only people living in caves do not know that heroin and prescription opiates are a problem. Federal funds should be directed to either more/better treatment or improving America's crumbling infrastructure.
    Like (6)
    Follow
    Share
    Everyone knows about the danger. Morons ignore that danger, they don't deserve any government assistance.
    Like (3)
    Follow
    Share
    The war on drugs is a failure and they have chosen a new target it is time to to stop all of this and the government spending more money that will only end up being a waste for everyone. Focus on preventing China's lethal Fentanyl coming over our borders would be better money spent. Let people take personal responsibility for their actions the government wasn't put in place to control every move a person makes or be a second parent of those they feel should be controlled at the loss of everyone else's freedoms and stop the discrimination of the wrong people. Prejudice is defined as a "preconceived opinion that is not based on reason or actual experience." It is prejudging someone or something in an unfavorable manor. Prejudice involves forming an opinion before becoming aware of relevant facts associated with someone or something. Prejudice in any form is wrong, unethical and has resulted in harm, injury and even death. This cannot be more true than in the case of chronic pain patients who require long-term opioid therapy and our current health care system. Chronic pain patients are routinely treated with the utmost degradation, shame, and humiliation in just about every emergency room in this country, as the vast majority of ER doctors and nurses assume chronic pain patients as "addicts" in search of a "fix"even when presenting with medical issues unrelated to pain. Some chronic pain patients seek emergency care due to the severe pain associated with flare-ups or complications that often accompanies their chronic ailments, while others seek emergency care due to acute injuries or illnesses not related with the disease, syndrome or permanent injury which causes their chronic pain. As soon as a chronic pain patient identifies their ailments and the opioid medication(s) they're taking, if any, the vast majority of ER doctors and nurses immediately change their demeanor. They're no longer concerned about adequately treating the patient. They're more concerned with getting that patient out of their ER, so that they don't have to deal with another "drug addict." This type of treatment has caused harm, permanent physical damage, further complications, needless suffering, and sometimes death! Barbara Dawson, a 57 year old lady, lost her life in the parking lot right outside a Florida ER, while handcuffed and in custody of police, after seeking treatment for breathing problems and stomach pain at her local ER in Blountstown, Florida. She had been in that ER a few other times within those past few months complaining of the same problems - breathing problems and abdominal pain. The ER doctors and nurses assumed Ms. Dawson as a "difficult patient" and a possible "drug seeker." You see, Barbara had been a patient a few times in the past in that same ER and suffered the prejudice associated with having a chronic illness which causes pain. Ms. Dawson, scared, vulnerable and at the mercy of those who are supposed to treat their patients with compassion, was on the receiving end of this prejudice. So extreme in their prejudice they refused to see or hear what she was desperately tried to tell the doctors and nurses the night she died frightened in hand cuffs in a hospital parking lot. As the medical staff ignored her pleas and coldly discharged her from their care, she knew something was wrong with her health that was outside the current chronic ailments she suffered from. Nurses cut the cord to her oxygen tube while listening to her cry, beg and plead for help! They then proceeded to call the police because she refused to leave. She was determined to find out what was wrong with her she knew her life was in danger. Because of her refusal to leave, she was handcuffed, dragged out of the ER, all while begging for medical intervention for breathing difficulties and abdominal pain. This vile treatment on behalf of those within that medical community which treated Barbara, those who were supposed to show the utmost compassion and care when treating this ill patient, cost this 57 year old lady her life. She died of a pulmonary embolism. How many Barbaras have there been? How many more that we aren't aware of? How many have lost their lives because of the prejudice associated with having a benign, yet incurable disease, syndrome or inoperable permanent injury which causes chronic pain and requires long-term opioid therapy? If we continue to allow this prejudice against those with chronic pain, who require prescription opioids to function, live and have some quality of life, there will be many more Barbaras who will loose their lives. On behalf of all the Barbara's out there don't let her death be in vain please step in and end the prejudice associated with being a chronic pain patient who relies on long-term opioid therapy. Prejudice should never be allowed, especially when it comes to our health care system. Too many lives are at stake for this to be ignored.
    Like (3)
    Follow
    Share
    Thanks to all the bs about medications like antibiotics and painkillers it isn't easy to get either even when one really needs them. Medicaid shouldn't get billed repeatedly for the same thing because the first dr refused to help. No one should have order drugs from outside the country or travel outside the country just to get medication their insurance covers. I've actually had medical staff accuse me of drug seeking when I did not ask for pain killers and did not complain about pain. I was totally thrown by her statement and still have no idea where that came from. Unless of course she was talking about antibiotics which I obtained later elsewhere.
    Like (3)
    Follow
    Share
    While prescription opioids will remain a problem whether this bill becomes a law or not, more needs to be done to stop the flow of heroin into the U.S. This bill doesn’t address that aspect of the crisis.
    Like (3)
    Follow
    Share
    "Awareness" of the danger of drugs in all levels, and the societal impact happens in schools ad nauseam from an early age; shoving kore "awareness" down the throats of people whom abuse drugs to escape issues in life that they are otherwise unable to cope with will not do anything more than waste federal funding. If we want to stop the trend, focus money on emotional regulation, effective interpersonal communication, and individual respect training and education at a younger age. By focusing on a digital education and insulating kids from conflict, we have removed their ability to cope with conflict and communicate with one another so, as they experience these challenges later in life, they turn to drug use to escape and cope with emotions they are otherwise unprepared to deal with.
    Like (2)
    Follow
    Share
    Exhibit A: Ohio. Heroin and opioid abuse is no longer stigmatized to 'junkies' it is in high schools, colleges, and professional environments. Low, middle, and upper classes. Cheap and plentiful. It's time to make this issue not so taboo and start a dialogue for a course of action.
    Like (2)
    Follow
    Share
    The federal government needs to balance the budget and reduce the deficit! Also, they need to address the flow of illegal drugs across our borders! We all know that grants from the federal government always come with strings attached, and Obama withholds money from states that enact policies he doesn't like. So I'd think twice before accepting a grant from Uncle Sam!
    Like (2)
    Follow
    Share
    These drugs are dangerous. Drugs destroy families. The oxycodones came out in the 90s and everyone was taking them. Someone may broke a leg and they prescribed oxies. People liked the way they made them feel so they would ask doctors for more. Eventually they would get cut off my their doctors and had no idea how to function without opiates. Then they buy them on the streets. They got expensive so a lot of people went down the heroin trail. Then that's it. Spiralling down and down. They should be able to get treatment without being judged.
    Like (2)
    Follow
    Share
    I see this as a form of gun control for drugs. The bottom line is this, bad people will continue to get drugs and do bad things no matter what the law says. Just the same, drug abusers will continue to get drugs and do bad things with them. Increase sentencing and implement mandatory rehab for multiple drug offenders. It simple and doesn't cost millions, or more, in grants and other nonsense. People know the consequences and dangers when they get their hands on the drug.
    Like (1)
    Follow
    Share
    NO NO NO!!! Let the States decide to fund drug awareness programs if the residents of those States want them. WE ARE 19 TRILLION IN DEBT-- STOP SPENDING!!! YOU SHOULD REDUCE SPENDING $2 FOR EVERY $1 OF TAX CUTS.
    Like (1)
    Follow
    Share
    Yes ! I believe that there are a lot of people In this nation that have extreme chronic pain that is proven by their doctors.and justifiably need narcotic pain killers to stop and or get rid of most of that pain ! But on the other hand there is a lot of abuse that goes on everyday ! And we need to stop that illegal drug abuse and those who traffic these legal drugs to children and adults ! And I believe that education and inforcement are extremely important if we are going to stop this problem ! I also believe we need a better and more efficient accountability from the manufacture to the consumer !
    Like (1)
    Follow
    Share
    Raising awareness is better than just locking people up
    Like (1)
    Follow
    Share
    Effective education leads to better decision making.
    Like (1)
    Follow
    Share
    We need to spend less money on prisons and more money on drug education, rehabilitation and education
    Like (1)
    Follow
    Share
    All of the bills are one sided, The CDC & FDA are lumping pain patients in with ADDICTS, any grants or studies need to realize there are pain patients to be considered. Please read: http://www.painnewsnetwork.org/stories/2016/6/6/pain-patients-sound-off-on-barbaric-treatment
    Like (1)
    Follow
    Share
    "Is becoming an epidemic"? Are you kidding me? When you have a 25 to 50% graduation rate in so many schools, what do all the other kids do? You know the answer! We have so many 70 year olds addicted to pills and even cheap heroin. Age matters no more! We have so many social problems, no jobs, families living in cars or on the street, the working poor, big corporations paying tiny wages and proud to be telling their employees to apply for food stamps, yet 1 family holds the wealth of 40% of the poorest in this country. We need to be increasing treatments centers, increasing the length of stays in treatment to be sure new behaviors are learned, make sure people have the health insurance to cover the costs for longer stays,....sadly the list goes on and on! People are dying, some actually want to. No joke! This is an epidemic NOW folks!
    Like (1)
    Follow
    Share
    Quit waating money. If people don't know the harm by now, they never will.
    Like
    Follow
    Share
    15 Trillion in debt equals no grants.
    Like
    Follow
    Share
    MORE