Like Causes?

Install the App
TRY NOW

house Bill H.R. 2170

Honoring the “Ghost Army” with a Congressional Gold Medal

Argument in favor

The Ghost Army’s contributions to the war effort during World War II deserve greater recognition, which a Congressional Gold Medal would provide. Not only that, but the bronze replicas would cover all the costs involved.

Anthony's Opinion
···
10/31/2015
Not sure it's ever a bad thing to honor veterans
Like (4)
Follow
Share
Julie's Opinion
···
10/31/2015
Also, the Tuskeegee Airmen and other groups of distinction!!
Like (4)
Follow
Share
AndrewGVN's Opinion
···
11/02/2015
They should be honored for their sacrifice made to the US.
Like (4)
Follow
Share

Argument opposed

While it’s a nice gesture, a Congressional Gold Medal would need to be provided to many other military units from World War II if the Ghost Army receives one. The resources and effort could be better used elsewhere.

resistor's Opinion
···
10/31/2015
First, an important effort or deed should be recognized in a timely manner, when still viewed in the context of its era, not decades later.
Like (7)
Follow
Share
Steven's Opinion
···
11/01/2015
While honoring fallen heroes is a worthy cause. How about putting effort, legislation and money into supporting the vets we have now that are living in the streets.
Like (5)
Follow
Share
GrumpyMSgt's Opinion
···
10/31/2015
Commendable, yes! Ask anyone under 30 about WWII and you're lucky if they can even provide the correct dates or name any leaders from that era. Perhaps it would be better to focus on current veterans being killed or injured in this Middle East boondoggle now to include Syria!
Like (5)
Follow
Share

What is House Bill H.R. 2170?

This bill would direct the Speaker of the House of Representatives and the President pro tempore of the Senate to award a Congressional Gold Medal to the 23rd Headquarters Special Troops for their service during World War II.

The 23rd Headquarters Special Troops were collectively known as the “Ghost Army” and were a tactical deception unit, meaning that they attempted to trick the enemy into believing that more robust American forces were active in areas that the Ghost Army operated in.

In this legislation, Congress encourages the Smithsonian Institution to make the medal available for public display at appropriate locations associated with the Ghost Army — with preference given to sites affiliated with the Smithsonian.

The Dept. of the Treasury would be authorized to mint and sell bronze duplicates of the Ghost Army’s Congressional Gold Medal that could be sold at a price sufficient to cover the costs of the medal.

Impact

Members of the Ghost Army and those who would learn about them through the Congressional Gold Medal; Congress, the Smithsonian Institution, sites that would display the Congressional Gold Medal, and the Dept. of the Treasury.

Cost of House Bill H.R. 2170

A CBO cost estimate is unavailable.

More Information

In-Depth: In a press release sponsoring Rep. Annie Kuster (D-NH), praised “all the heroic members of the Ghost Army whose innovative tactics saved thousands of lives during humanity’s darkest hour.” As this bill’s lead cosponsor, Rep. Peter King (R-NY) added this praise for the Ghost Army:

“Their heroics were unknown for more than 40 years and it is finally time that the American people not only learn about but recognize their ingenuity and selflessness which saved countless American and Allied lives.”

The Ghost Army was composed of recruits from art schools, advertising agencies, and architectural firms among other walks of life. At its peak, the 23rd Headquarters Special Troops only composed 1,100 troops, but they befuddled the German Army into believing they constituted a much longer force. This was accomplished through the use of dummy tanks and planes, and broadcasting the sounds of soldiers and artillery to trick the Germans that could be heard as far as 15 miles away.

Prior to D-Day, the Ghost Army assisted British in Operation Fortitude, a deception designed to mislead the Germans into believing that Allied landings at Normandy were a feint, and that Calais was the primary objective of the invasion. The Ghost Army would go on to participate in deceptions off the Normandy beaches with a fake Mulberry harbour, near the city of Brest, France before aiding battles near the Ruhr River, Maginot Line, the Hürtgen Forest, and the crossing of the Rhine.


Media:

Summary by Eric Revell
(Photo Credit: Flickr user PhotosNormandie)

AKA

Ghost Army Congressional Gold Medal Act

Official Title

To award a Congressional Gold Medal to the 23rd Headquarters Special Troops, known as the "Ghost Army", collectively, in recognition of its unique and incredible service during World War II.

bill Progress


  • Not enacted
    The President has not signed this bill
  • The senate has not voted
  • The house has not voted
      house Committees
      Committee on Administration
      Committee on Financial Services
    IntroducedApril 30th, 2015
    First, an important effort or deed should be recognized in a timely manner, when still viewed in the context of its era, not decades later.
    Like (7)
    Follow
    Share
    While honoring fallen heroes is a worthy cause. How about putting effort, legislation and money into supporting the vets we have now that are living in the streets.
    Like (5)
    Follow
    Share
    Commendable, yes! Ask anyone under 30 about WWII and you're lucky if they can even provide the correct dates or name any leaders from that era. Perhaps it would be better to focus on current veterans being killed or injured in this Middle East boondoggle now to include Syria!
    Like (5)
    Follow
    Share
    Not sure it's ever a bad thing to honor veterans
    Like (4)
    Follow
    Share
    Also, the Tuskeegee Airmen and other groups of distinction!!
    Like (4)
    Follow
    Share
    They should be honored for their sacrifice made to the US.
    Like (4)
    Follow
    Share
    Every members of the military should be recognized. THAT SHOULD BE DONE ALL THE TIME.
    Like (3)
    Follow
    Share
    It's a nice thought. However, and I mean no disrespect to their contributions to the Allies victory over the Axis powers, they used their God given talents in a productive way to help the war effort. And while their efforts were different and fascinating, I'm not sure that they were anymore heroic than others who did menial work...i.e., the African-American and The Red Ball Express moving supplies and ammo - and made as much of an impact as well.
    Like (2)
    Follow
    Share
    Let us honor these men who stood by justice in the world's darkest hour. Let us educate future generations of Americans about their hard work and committment to freedom. Let us also care for the veterans we have back home--if the bronze minting has a surplus of revenue, perhaps put that towards helping veterans start businesses?
    Like (2)
    Follow
    Share
    You should honor ALL VETERNS in WWII
    Like (2)
    Follow
    Share
    I don't think World War 2 veterans need to be honored anymore than we already do honor them, which is continuously. I think a true WW2 veteran would advise us to focus our energy and resources in present and future affairs.
    Like (1)
    Follow
    Share
    As one of our military's first and most effective Special Operations units, they should finally get the recognition they deserve
    Like (1)
    Follow
    Share
    I know what it's like to be shot at and have to watch your brother bleed to death!!! So you God Damn Right they deserve it.!!! Semper Fi....!!!
    Like (1)
    Follow
    Share
    Too little, too late. There many Korean War Vets still living.. Give them the Congressional medal of honor. Give them at least what Congress makes, and the benefits they have.
    Like (1)
    Follow
    Share
    The con argument sounds like the latest Republican attack on the military & veterans! Why is it that a party that wants eternal war & hates every country that is not in North America (excluding Mexico, of course!) despises those who actually fight in the endless wars & begrudges honoring them? Just honor these people and stop behaving like idiots!
    Like (1)
    Follow
    Share
    Soldiers of that time offered the ultimate sacrifice. They have earned all honors.
    Like (1)
    Follow
    Share
    Seems like the right thing to do. They should have recognized them decades ago - when most of them were still alive. Better late than never...
    Like (1)
    Follow
    Share
    The time for this honor was at least 40 years ago. A great gesture but somewhat late. Honor should be bestowed following heroic deeds, not 70 years later. Most of the hero's immediate family have even passed.
    Like (1)
    Follow
    Share
    I'm a little conflicted. It doesn't sound like these guys were in as much danger as other soldiers, but I like the idea of honoring warfare that was clever instead of brutal, and this group saved lives. I'm for it.
    Like (1)
    Follow
    Share
    A little late.
    Like
    Follow
    Share
    MORE