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house Bill H.R. 160

Ending Corporal Punishment in Schools Act of 2017

Bill Details

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Title

Ending Corporal Punishment in Schools Act of 2017

Official Title

To end the use of corporal punishment in schools, and for other purposes.

Summary

Ending Corporal Punishment in Schools Act of 2017 This bill amends the General Education Provisions Act to prohibit the Department of Education (ED) from providing funding to any state or local educational agency (LEA) that allows its school personnel to inflict corporal punishment upon a student. ED may award three-year grants to states or LEAsto assist them with improving school climate and culture.Grants must be used to implement school-wide positive behavior programs.

bill Progress


  • Not enacted
    The President has not signed this bill
  • The senate has not voted
  • The house has not voted
      house Committees
      Committee on Education and Labor
    IntroducedJanuary 3rd, 2017
    Morally unethical. Scientifically an ineffective means of discipline. Personally, as a public middle school science teacher, I could not imagine inflicting pain or discomfort on a child I've promised to nurture. Unbelievable that this is still present in our day and time.
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    How is this even an issue?!?!?
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    This seems like a pretty obvious decision. Even if parents support this kind of punishment, it is only their place to administer it. This should not be happening in our schools.
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    Corporal punishment doesn't work and causes lasting psychological damage whether administered by a parent or other caregiver. It goes without saying that no one should be allowed to hit a child.
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    “He who spares his rod hates his son, but he who loves him disciplines him promptly.” ‭‭(Proverbs‬ ‭13:24‬ ‭NKJV‬‬) “Foolishness is bound up in the heart of a child; the rod of correction will drive it far from him.” ‭‭(Proverbs‬ ‭22:15‬ ‭NKJV‬‬) “Do not withhold correction from a child, for if you beat him with a rod, he will not die. You shall beat him with a rod, and deliver his soul from hell.” ‭‭(Proverbs‬ ‭23:13-14‬ ‭NKJV‬‬) “The rod and rebuke give wisdom, but a child left to himself brings shame to his mother.” (‭‭Proverbs‬ ‭29:15‬ ‭NKJV‬‬) “Now no chastening seems to be joyful for the present, but painful; nevertheless, afterward it yields the peaceable fruit of righteousness to those who have been trained by it.” (‭‭Hebrews‬ ‭12:11‬ ‭NKJV‬‬) If God thinks that spanking is not only appropriate but wise, who are we to say it's not? When one of my sons played hooky from school, I watched the principal give him a paddling; then when we got home, I gave him another one. Spanking is HARDLY cruel and inhuman punishment! Mind you, I'm not talking about beating a child! And incidentally, my son never skipped school again.
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    Violence begets violence and negative builds on negative, in life and in school. When violence occurs in school at the hands of the adults teaching children, children learn that violence is an option in life. They learn because they are taught by the same adults who are teaching them Math, Reading, Social Studies. Anytime adults hurt children there is a power imbalance and bullying and abuse have just occurred. Aren't we, as a society, incredibly concerned about bullying? Why would we sanction, institutionalize, abuse and bullying? Why would this even be a question. No to corporal punishment, yes to this bill.
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    Knowing that when one hits and humiliates a child, the only lesson (s)he learns is to hit and humiliate, there should be no question that this act should be passed.
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    Corporal punishment HAS NOT been found to be an effective discipline strategy for increasing compliance in children. The egregious costs of this antiquated and outdated disciplinary strategy do more harm than good to the children of our Nation. Corporal punishment has been associated with adverse outcomes for children, such as increased physical aggression and antisocial behaviors, higher estimates of mental health problems, and lower academic achievement. These data do not even acknowledge large disparities between race and disability. Not only will this bill eliminate corporal punishment in public schools, it will give school districts the opportunity to apply for grants from the Secretary in order to receive assistance. These grants can be used to implement positive behavioral supports within their schools- programs that aim to inform teachers on nonviolent disciplinary tactics to encourage positive behaviors and reduce problem behaviors, such as positive and negative reinforcement. This bill transcends state's rights and tackles a more pressing and important matter: the safety of our Country's children, and their future impact on our society.
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    Violence begets violence. Schools are a place where children learn the value of reasoning and discussion. Teachers and principals should embody those values especially when taking disciplinary action. Don't teach kids to bully by example.
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    We need discipline and order in our schools. Children need to learn to respect adults and themselves.
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    As a teacher, absolutely never.
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    Research has shown that corporal punishment is not an effective means for changing children's behavior. Our schools need to embrace positive behavior management strategies and focus on mental health prevention.
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    Corporal punishment at an early age is only setting kids up for failiure, they need to feel supported by their educators even through periods of disobedience.
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    Any punishment that results in assault probably should be nixed. If a man came at me with a wooden paddle meant to harm me, shooting him in self defense would be legal.
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    I still can't believe this is legal in some states
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    The research is clear that this form of punishment just doesn't work.
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    This should not be a federal issue. Leave it to the states to decide.
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    Duh?
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    We know too much to continue to this arcane practice.
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    School is a privilege. There are more effective ways to address children's behavior than corporal punishment. What are we teaching our kids if we allow this? That resorting to violence is the most effective way of solving a problem?
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