Like Causes?

Install the App
TRY NOW

house Bill H.R. 1313

Should Small-Business Loans For Disabled Veterans Extend to Their Spouses?

Argument in favor

This bill would ensure that the surviving spouses of individuals who were disabled in combat receive their benefits. Just because a veteran isn’t 100% disabled doesn’t mean they don’t face huge obstacles because of the sacrifice they made for the country.

Alis's Opinion
···
05/19/2015
Stop nickeling & diming veterans! If the country destroy their lives, it also destroys their families' life! Do everything to make up for Congressional war-mongering that has been followed by Congressional whining that wars have horrible long-term financial consequences!!
Like (4)
Follow
Share
···
05/18/2015
I join the VFW in support of this bill. If a spouse co-owns a business with a disabled veteran and the veteran passes on, the spouse should not be denied the benefits the veteran accrued. Though a spouse may enlist or be commissioned, the reality is that their home front is pulling along with the serviceman or woman in uniform.
Like (1)
Follow
Share
···
06/04/2015
AThe sum of the veteran still down supper. They do make a choice to marry a military personnel, one who might go to war and die. The widow left standing at that point is the one who suffers most m, though I doubt the military is blamed. Regardless, the spouse and their children should benefit from the risks of the man of the house. Anyways, it isn't like the military pays all that well.
Like (1)
Follow
Share

Argument opposed

Disabled veterans and their families are certainly entitled to benefits thanks to their sacrifice to the country. But the distinctions that this bill makes are so arbitrary. Are veterans who are only 10% disabled entitled to the same rights as those who are 90% disabled? No.

LibertyForAll's Opinion
···
07/29/2015
Benefits are the right of the veterans. But the transfer of such benefits should be available.
Like (3)
Follow
Share
Paul's Opinion
···
05/20/2015
This bill is too vague and arbitrary in applying the rules for eligibility
Like (2)
Follow
Share
V's Opinion
···
05/28/2015
This is an arbitrary benefit for Veterans. They deserve whatever benefits have been established. I do not think benefits should be expanded. If current benefits are too little for anyone planning to serve, they should not serve.
Like (1)
Follow
Share

What is House Bill H.R. 1313?

This bill seeks to protect businesses owned by disabled veterans by extending the grants offered to disabled veterans to their spouses, in the event of their death.

Veterans that were disabled in combat are eligible for some grants to start small businesses. Under current law, if the veteran is 100% disabled, their spouse will continue to get their benefits until they remarry, until they give up their share of the business, or for ten years after the veteran’s death. 

This bill would amend that law so that the spouses of veterans who are less than 100% disabled could keep getting those benefits for three years after their death. The surviving spouses of people who were 100% disabled would still be able to receive benefits for ten years.

Impact

The spouses of disabled veterans, disabled veterans, their business partners and customers, the Department of Veterans Affairs.

Cost of House Bill H.R. 1313

A CBO estimate is unavailable.

More Information

Of Note:

What does it mean to be 100% disabled? Well, it can mean a whole lot of different things. The VA rates individuals’ disabilities within a wide array of categories — respiratory system, skin, mental health and even dental condition — basically, every part of the body. Within those categories, individuals are given a rating of disability. 

For example: if a veteran has a hard time keeping a job and maintaining relationships from a combat-related mental health disorder, and maybe also has panic attacks more than once a week and trouble speaking, they’ll probably be rated as 50% disabled. If they’re having constant hallucinations or unable to remember the names of the people close to them, they’ll be rated as 100% disabled. On the other hand, if they experience something like an increased tendency to get stressed, something that can often be managed with medication, they’ll be rated as 10% disabled.

Veterans’ ratings across different categories add up, but not arithmetically. The VA uses a combined rating table to determine disability. So, for instance, if a veteran had a chronic ringing in their ears from loud noises in combat — that’s tinnitus, the most common disability among veterans — and failure of their heart’s left ventricle, they’d be counted as 64% disabled. That’s where 10% (tinnitus) and 60% (left ventricle failure) meet on the chart.


It’s also worth remembering that this bill only applies to disabilities that veterans acquire during combat. If the veteran got tinnitus from, say, working on a loud construction site or at an airport, they wouldn’t be able to apply that to their VA compensation.


Media:


Summary by James Helmsworth

(Photo Credit: Flickr user MTAPhotos

AKA

Service Disabled Veteran Owned Small Business Relief Act

Official Title

To amend title 38, United States Code, to enhance the treatment of certain small business concerns for purposes of Department of Veterans Affairs contracting goals and preferences.

bill Progress


  • Not enacted
    The President has not signed this bill
  • The senate has not voted
      senate Committees
      Committee on Veterans' Affairs
  • The house Passed May 18th, 2015
    Roll Call Vote 403 Yea / 0 Nay
      house Committees
      Economic Opportunity
      Committee on Veterans' Affairs
    IntroducedMarch 4th, 2015

Log in or create an account to see how your Reps voted!
    Stop nickeling & diming veterans! If the country destroy their lives, it also destroys their families' life! Do everything to make up for Congressional war-mongering that has been followed by Congressional whining that wars have horrible long-term financial consequences!!
    Like (4)
    Follow
    Share
    Benefits are the right of the veterans. But the transfer of such benefits should be available.
    Like (3)
    Follow
    Share
    This bill is too vague and arbitrary in applying the rules for eligibility
    Like (2)
    Follow
    Share
    It doesn't matter if a vet is 10 or 90 percent disabled. They are disabled because they were protecting Americans from seeing the horrible things in this world that make us feel uncomfortable. And while they were gone their spouses had to survive alone missing them and worrying about them - now caring for them. They deserve the opportunity to pursue the American Dream of owning a business. They are the reason it is possible.
    Like (1)
    Follow
    Share
    AThe sum of the veteran still down supper. They do make a choice to marry a military personnel, one who might go to war and die. The widow left standing at that point is the one who suffers most m, though I doubt the military is blamed. Regardless, the spouse and their children should benefit from the risks of the man of the house. Anyways, it isn't like the military pays all that well.
    Like (1)
    Follow
    Share
    I join the VFW in support of this bill. If a spouse co-owns a business with a disabled veteran and the veteran passes on, the spouse should not be denied the benefits the veteran accrued. Though a spouse may enlist or be commissioned, the reality is that their home front is pulling along with the serviceman or woman in uniform.
    Like (1)
    Follow
    Share
    Geez, we need to do so much more than this for veterans and their families. So yes to this but let's do more!
    Like (1)
    Follow
    Share
    This is an arbitrary benefit for Veterans. They deserve whatever benefits have been established. I do not think benefits should be expanded. If current benefits are too little for anyone planning to serve, they should not serve.
    Like (1)
    Follow
    Share
    They sacrificed too
    Like
    Follow
    Share
    This should aid family struck by our wars...regardless of who is the owner of the business.
    Like
    Follow
    Share
    The benefits should be limited to a certain amount of time after they pass though.
    Like
    Follow
    Share
    Losing a leg and gaining a ringing in your ear can both be hard to handle. I think that the spouses of veterans dealing with these things suffer along side the veterans both while they serve and afterward and that they should share the benefits.
    Like
    Follow
    Share
    Yes. If you are disabled, your benefits should extend to your spouse.
    Like
    Follow
    Share
    It's not just the vet that makes the sacrifice. Their whole family does as well.
    Like
    Follow
    Share
    Family members and spouses of veterans suffer when the primary service member suffers. We should take care of them for the sacrifices that they have to make in order to support our fighting force so that they remain motivated to stay in the fight.
    Like
    Follow
    Share
    The benefits are earned by their service. It is not an award for getting disabled. It matters not how much he is disabled it matters how much he needs.
    Like
    Follow
    Share
    But I also believe that ANY disabled person deserves this, regardless of serving our country or not.
    Like
    Follow
    Share
    There's no downside to growing the economy by offering reduced rate small business loans to surviving spouses of all injured veterans.
    Like
    Follow
    Share
    If the veteran is unable to work, then it would absolutely be necessary for the spouse to be eligible.
    Like
    Follow
    Share
    Spouses are the unsung heroes. Many are uneducated, or cannot work. This would be a great opportunity for military spouses to be able to do things that they only wish they could do-but can't, due to all of the circumstances that come with proudly supporting their military spouses in their military careers. It's extremely difficult to start a business from nothing when your spouse is a new vet, trying to get back into the work force with nothing.
    Like
    Follow
    Share
    MORE