Former SCOTUS Justice Sandra Day O'Connor Dies at 93

Will you celebrate her legacy?

  • 90.1k
    LeslieG
    Voted Yes
    12/04/2023

    Sandra Day O'Connor (SDO) will always be remembered as not only the 1st female judge on the Supreme Court, known for her hard working, moderate conservative position where she was the deciding vote and wrote an opinion for 360 cases but also the 1st State Attorney General (AZ) unlike todays court where most cases come through the shadow docket where neither a written opinion nor signature is required.

    Like RBG, she was initially offered secretarial positions after graduating from a pre-eminent law school (Stanford versus RBG Harvard-Columbia) but eventual found work in the public sector (deputy district attorney versus RBG Rutgers law professor).

    SDO's husband was also an attorney (like RBGs) so they both did a stint in the U.S. Army Judge Advocate General Corps in Germany before returning to the U.S. for private practice followed by becoming the 1st U.S. state attorney general (AZ) until she was appointed to the Supreme Court during the Reagan Presidency.

    Even in retirement she was civic minded creating an online games platform to teach 5M students in 50 states civics.

    "She was the first woman to serve on the Supreme Court. A moderate conservative, she was known for her dispassionate and meticulously researched opinions."

    "360 Supreme Court cases decided 5-4, she cast the deciding vote for the majority, including 114 cases where she wrote an opinion."

    "developed a reputation for independent, rigorously fact-based legal thinking and analysis. Justice O'Connor often focused on the real-world implications of any given Court decision and prioritized the impacts on real people over purely ideological or theoretical considerations. This prevented her from being pigeonholed into a simple "liberal" or "conservative" box."

    "After retiring from the Supreme Court, she spearheaded the creation of an online games platform for learning civics that is used today by more than 5 million students in all 50 states."

    https://oconnorinstitute.org/civic-programs/oconnor-history/sandra-day-oconnor-policy-archives-research-library/legacy/

    https://www.britannica.com/biography/Sandra-Day-OConnor

  • 1,820
    RoyB
    12/04/2023

    She will be honored among the greats.  Yes, I will celebrate her legacy.  

  • 1,122
    Lois
    Voted Maybe
    12/05/2023

    I am glad she broke that glass ceiling and I agreed with her vote on Roe v Wade.  But she also was too biased toward the republicans

  • 3,634
    John
    Voted Yes
    12/04/2023

    I look at this woman's groundbreaking legacy as a Supreme Court judge with amazement and think my god what a wonderful person, then I look at Clarence Thomas and I think I wanna throw up on my shoes.

  • 3,645
    Kevin
    Voted Maybe
    12/05/2023

    I didn't agree with her about everything.

  • 6,757
    DaveS
    Voted Yes
    12/09/2023

    She was way better than Alitos will ever and his sloppy work to get his way!

  • 2,380
    Martha
    Voted Yes
    12/05/2023

    She followed and upheld the Constitution, unlke the 6 jackass conservatives currently on the bench.

  • 2,573
    530 East Hunt Highway
    Voted Yes
    12/05/2023

    As a woman she broke the glass ceiling and thrived in a man's world!

  • 378
    Jim
    Voted Yes
    12/04/2023

    She was an outstanding judge that did her best to uphold and  interpret the constitution. Unlike some of our sitting judges today that are more than willing to change positions or interpretation based upon gifts, vacations, or favors. P

  • 202
    Robert
    Voted Yes
    12/04/2023

    I was just a kid when we arrived in Arizona in 1948. Mostly everyone was like Sandra Day, frank, accepting, hard-working, gracious, friendly. We looked out for one another. Now, not so much. This country was built by people like her. She represents the very best in human nature and in the American spirit.

  • 45.0k
    Brian
    Voted Yes
    12/04/2023

    Despite her conservative leanings on some rulings, O'Connor was historic and remarkable as both the first woman on the Supreme Court (after, you know, 200+ years of only men) and a consensus builder her used her ample retirement years to speak out on behalf of Alzheimer's care. I'm sad that I didn't realize she was still alive, but really happy she had a long retirement and enjoyed her privacy.

    Justice O'Connor forged a path for other women to follow and is a role model for girls across the country, and I hope her legacy is never diminished as the Court itself struggles for relevance and credibility.