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​Some artists store their awards in a trophy case

In a new interview with Rolling Stone, Tame Impala’s Kevin Parker revealed that one of his ARIAs (Australia’s Grammy equivalent) ended up under the dirt after a strange mushrooms trip.

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Some artists store their awards in a trophy case, others… bury them in their backyard?

In a new interview with Rolling Stone, Tame Impala's Kevin Parker revealed that one of his ARIAs (Australia's...

Some artists store their awards in a trophy case, others… bury them in their backyard?

In a new interview with Rolling Stone, Tame Impala's Kevin Parker revealed that one of his ARIAs (Australia's Grammy equivalent) ended up under the dirt after a strange mushrooms trip.

"I decided to bury one of my ARIAs in the backyard—an Australian version of a Grammy, basically," he said. "Maybe someone was holding one, and I said, 'Let's fucking bury it. Deep.' I can't remember which one it was—maybe Best Rock Album, for Lonerism. I can't imagine when that thing will ever resurface. You know? This metal, triangular, prism artifact—how long into the future will that thing be lying beneath the ground? And if it gets pulled up, who will pull it up, and will they be human?"

Tame Impala has won eight ARIA awards since 2013, including two wins each for Best Group and Album of the Year.

Parker previously discussed how a mushroom trip inspired the band's 2015 album, Currents, in an interview with The Guardian. Download free ringtones for Android and iPhone

"I was in LA a few years ago and for some reason we'd taken mushrooms, it must have been the end of our tour," he said. "I was coked up as well, and a friend was driving us around LA in this old sedan. He was playing the Bee Gees and it had the most profound emotional effect. I'm getting butterflies just thinking about it. I was listening to 'Staying Alive', a song I've heard all my life. At that moment it had this really emotive, melancholy feel to it. The beat felt overwhelmingly strong and, at that moment, it sounded pretty psychedelic. It moved me, and that's what I always want out of psych music. I want it to transport me."

Although burying an award in the backyard is certainly odd, Parker isn't the only artist to do something unconventional with an award. JAY-Z famously keeps his Grammys on the floor, and John Mayer broke his 2005 Grammy award in half because he thought his competitor, Alicia Keys, had made a better song.

Read Parker's full Rolling Stone interview here and catch up on all the lyrics to the band's Currents on Genius now.

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