Sign the Petition to

U.S. State Department

I'm writing to express serious concern regarding the proposed expansion of the Alberta Clipper Pipeline (Line 67). I thank you for preparing an environmental impact statement, however, your findings failed to account for numerous effects on the environment. I urge you address the following critical issues:

Expanding Line 67 will increase climate pollution. Tar sands projects are increasingly risky given the current price of oil and economic environment. For example, Exxon recently announced that it intends to leave millions of barrels of tar sands in the ground due to lack of economic incentive for recovery. According to Bloomberg, “low energy prices made it mathematically impossible to profitably harvest those fields within five years.” Furthermore, both Forbes and Wall Street Journal have recently detailed the fact that tar sands are no longer a stable investment, undercutting Enbridge’s arguments that the expansion of the Alberta Clipper Pipeline is necessary and that the oil will be extracted with or without this border crossing expansion. Therefore, your analysis must adequately account for the climate impacts of extracting and burning 400,000 barrels per day of additional tar sands. The State Department must also analyze the cumulative climate impacts of the Alberta Clipper expansion in conjunction with its decision on Keystone XL, which together would add 1.3 million barrels of capacity.

Added capacity on Line 67 means an increased risk of devastating oil spills. Capacity in an existing pipeline is increased by ratcheting up the pressure inside the pipeline, forcing more tar sands through and increasing the physical stress on the pipeline, increasing the risk of spills. Alberta Clipper crosses the Mississippi River, the Great Lakes’ Wild Rice region, Chippewa National Forest, and the Fond du Lac, Red Lake Nation, and Leech Lake Indian Reservations -- home to Minnesota Anishinaabe/ Ojibwe who have lived in the Great Lakes region since before 800 A.D. -- and nearly doubling the capacity increases the risk of devastating spills. In fact, the Alberta Clipper Pipeline was already shut down once because of 5,250-gallon spill -- increasing the capacity of the pipeline means the next spill will only be worse.

Enbridge already has a long history of devastating pipeline spills. Between 1999 and 2010, it was responsible for more than 800 pipeline spills. It was responsible for three of the fifteen largest inland oil spills in the U.S. including the Kalamazoo River disaster which saw 843,000 gallons of toxic tar sands crude dumped into Michigan’s waterways -- costing more than a billion dollars in cleanup costs and making local residents sick.

Finally, a 45 day comment period and only one public meeting is insufficient for adequate public engagement on a project with such a wide range of impact, so I ask that you expand the public comment period to 90 days and hold hearings in communities that would suffer the impacts in the case of an oil spill in order to better understand the risk this expansion project poses.

Signed,

Sierra Club

This petition closed 9 months ago

How this will help

Enbridge -- the company responsible for the biggest inland oil spill in the U.S. and part owner of the Dakota Access Pipeline -- wants to double the capacity of tar sands coming to the US from...

Enbridge -- the company responsible for the biggest inland oil spill in the U.S. and part owner of the Dakota Access Pipeline -- wants to double the capacity of tar sands coming to the US from Canada on its Alberta Clipper pipeline. The State Department recently said they didn't think this would harm the environment at all. Simply put, that's absurd.This announcement came just after the Trump administration advanced the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) and the Keystone XL pipeline (KXL) -- despite the fact that DAPL was in the midst of its own environmental review and KXL had already been rejected by the State Department because of its climate impacts. It's clear that putting former Exxon CEO Rex Tillerson in charge of the State Department means giving Big Oil a free pass to run roughshod over our clean air, water, and to ignore tribal treaty rights and concerns.Alberta Clipper currently pumps up to 450,000 barrels per day (bpd) of tar sands crude from Alberta, Canada to Wisconsin. It crosses the Mississippi River, the Great Lakes' Wild Rice region, Chippewa National Forest, and the Fond du Lac, Red Lake Nation, and Leech Lake Indian Reservations -- home to Minnesota Anishinaabe/Ojibwe who have lived in the Great Lakes region since before 800 A.D. Enbridge wants to almost double the pipeline's capacity to 800,000 bpd, nearly the same as the Keystone XL pipeline. Capacity in an existing pipeline is increased by ratcheting up the pressure to pump more tar sands through, increasing the physical stress on the pipeline, and increasing the risk of spills. Thankfully, the State Department is required to take public comments on its shortsighted plan to approve the Alberta Clipper tar sands pipeline expansion, so this fight isn't over. Submit a public comment now to let Trump and his oil-loving State Department know that we aren't backing down.

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