Pledge to

Save the rhino

Learn how to do this...

How to do this

Complete these steps by July 8

  1. 1

    Report any suspicious activity to the authorities, if you suspect someone is selling/buying rhino horn products. - I love rhinos

  2. 2

    Donate towards much-needed anti-poaching equipment and support

    - I love rhinos

  3. 3

    Become a member of Save the Rhino and join the struggle -

    - I love rhinos

How this will help

At the turn of the 19th century, there were approximately one million
rhinos. In 1970, there were around 70,000. Today, there are only around 28,000 rhinos surviving in the wild.

Three of...

At the turn of the 19th century, there were approximately one million
rhinos. In 1970, there were around 70,000. Today, there are only around 28,000 rhinos surviving in the wild.

Three of the five species of rhino are "Critically Endangered" as defined by the IUCN (World Conservation Union). A taxon is classified as critically endangered when the best available evidence indicates that it meets any of a range of pre-determined criteria. It is therefore considered to be facing an extremely high risk of extinction in the wild. The Southern subspecies of the white rhino is classified by the IUCN in the lesser category of being "Near Threatened"; and the Greater one-horned rhino is classified as "Vulnerable"; even this is considered to be facing a high risk of extinction in the wild.

In 2014, some of us are lucky enough to be able to travel to Africa and Asia to see them in the wild. In 2024, when our children have grown up, will they still be able to see wild rhinos? 

- I love rhinos

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