Sign the Petition to

Congress: Pass H.R. 499, The Ending Marijuana Prohibition Act

The ongoing enforcement of cannabis prohibition financially burdens taxpayers, encroaches upon civil liberties, engenders disrespect for the law, impedes legitimate scientific research into the plant's medicinal properties, and disproportionately impacts communities of color. Furthermore, the criminalization of cannabis simply doesn't work.

A pragmatic regulatory framework that allows for limited, licensed production, sale, and taxation of cannabis to adults -- but restricts use among young people -- best reduces the risks associated with its use or abuse. I encourage you to support legislation to regulate marijuana, not criminalize it. Therefore, I urge you to support House Resolution 499: The Ending Marijuana Prohibition Act of 2013.

Signed,

NORML

This petition closed about 2 months ago

How this will help

The ongoing enforcement of cannabis prohibition financially burdens taxpayers, encroaches upon civil liberties, engenders disrespect for the law, impedes legitimate scientific research into the...

The ongoing enforcement of cannabis prohibition financially burdens taxpayers, encroaches upon civil liberties, engenders disrespect for the law, impedes legitimate scientific research into the plant's medicinal properties, and disproportionately impacts communities of color. Furthermore, the criminalization of cannabis simply doesn't work.

Despite more than 70 years of federal marijuana prohibition, Americans' consumption of and demand for cannabis is here to stay. It is time for members of Congress to acknowledge this reality. It is time to stop ceding control of the marijuana market to untaxed criminal enterprises and it is time for lawmakers to impose common-sense regulations governing cannabis' personal use by adults and licensing its production. 

A majority of voters support regulating the adult consumption of cannabis, according to a variety of national polls. Further, according to a December 2012 Gallup poll, 64 percent of respondents do not believe that the federal government "should take steps to enforce federal anti-marijuana laws in those states" that have legalized the plant.

Never in modern history has there existed greater public support for ending the nation's nearly century-long experiment with marijuana prohibition and replacing it with regulation. The historic votes on Election Day in Colorado and Washington -- where, for the first time ever, a majority of voters decided at the ballot box to abolish cannabis prohibition -- underscore this political reality.

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