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Pledge to

Not watch or encourage watching of p0rn.

How this will help

Defenders of p0rnography argue that it is not harmful, and thus should not be regulated or banned. Citing the 1970 Presidential Commission on Obscenity and P0rnography, they conclude that there is no relationship between exposure to erotic material and subsequent behavior. But two subsequent decades of research based on the increased production of more explicit and violent forms of p0rnography has shown the profound effects p0rnography can have on human behavior.Psychologist Edward Donnerstein (University of Wisconsin) found that brief exposure to violent forms of p0rnography can lead to anti-social attitudes and behavior. Male viewers tend to be more aggressive towards women, less responsive to pain and suffering of r@pe victims, and more willing to accept various myths about r@pe.Dr. Dolf Zimmerman and Dr. Jennings Bryant showed that continued exposure to p0rnography had serious adverse effects on beliefs about sexuality in general and on attitudes toward women in particular. They also found that p0rnography desensitizes people to r@pe as a criminal offense.These researchers also found that massive exposure to p0rnography encourages a desire for increasingly deviant materials which involve violence, like sadomasochism and r@pe.Feminist author Diana Russell notes in her book R@pe and Marriage the correlation between deviant behavior (including abuse) and p0rnography. She also found that p0rnography leads men and women to experience conflict, suffering, and sexual dissatisfaction.Researcher Victor Cline (University of Utah) has documented in his research how men become addicted to p0rnographic materials, begin to desire more explicit or deviant material, and end up acting out what they have seen.According to Charles Keating of Citizens for Decency Through Law, research reveals that 77 percent of child molesters of boys and 87 percent of child molesters of girls admitted imitating the sexual behavior they had seen modeled in p0rnography.Sociologists Murray Straus and Larry Baron (University of New Hampshire) found that r@pe rates are highest in states which have high sales of sex magazines and lax enforcement of p0rnography laws.6Michigan state police detective Darrell Pope found that of the 38,000 sexual assault cases in Michigan (1956-1979), in 41 percent of the cases p0rnographic material was viewed just prior to or during the crime. This agrees with research done by psychotherapist David Scott who found that "half the r@pists studied used p0rnography to arouse themselves immediately prior to seeking out a victim."The Final Report of the 1986 Attorney General's Commission on P0rnography lists a full chapter of testimony (197-223) from victims whose assailants had previously viewed p0rnographic materials. The adverse effects range from physical harm (r@pe, torture, murder, sexually transmitted disease) to psychological harm (suicidal thoughts, fear, shame, nightmares).

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