Pledge to ask my congressman to allow science to make wildlife decisions

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5,942 pledged
+2,942 over goal

This pledge closed 3 months ago

The gray wolf was given the sad distinction of being the FIRST ANIMAL EVER REMOVED FROM FEDERAL PROTECTION (the Endangered Species Act), NOT BY SCIENCE - BUT BY CONGRESS! That would be equivalent to, and just as effective as, a fireman making an arrest or a policeman putting out a fire -- it just isn't in their career experience or job description. Yet congress did make that back- room deal to delist gray wolves from federal protection, ignoring the science---turning them over to state governments of Idaho, Montana and Wyoming for "protection and management". This predictably ended up being equivalent to turning over kindergarten students to pedophiles, as the blood-thirsty nuts in those states already had their massacres planned, and posted on public forums after years of saber rattling. Since that fateful April, states in the Great Lakes region were granted management of wolves and immediately began to annihilate the wolves. Why was this done when science never made the recommendation to delist the gray wolf? The immediate, short answer is that congress wanted to keep the Democratic majority in the senate by appeasing Jon Tester's constituents in Montana -- a great majority of them are ranchers and trophy hunters.--thus assuring his re-election. But the longer, dark answer is that the idea to delist the gray wolf had been brewing for years in the wolf killing states. It was just a matter of time before congress would cave in to those who were hungry for wolf trophies, a new 'game animal', and a new hunting season. All the misery wolves have endured since, has been strictly for the purpose of outdoor recreation and 'fun' -- as people don't eat top, apex predators like wolves--and the rancher's exaggerated claims of livestock losses were proven false, as wolves are responsible for LESS THAN 1% of all livestock losses per year. Congress going into the 'biology business' has set a highly dangerous precedent for delisting other endangered animals like the polar bear and grizzly bear--and in general, has weakened the Endangered Species Act itself---making the act, itself, also endangered! In bed with wealthy trophy hunting groups like Safari Club International, the NRA, and Fish & Game Forever (just to name a few), and in bed with the oil industry who wants to clear land of wildlife for drilling and pipelines, and the ranching industry who wants public lands for grazing---congress is being bought and sold down the river. What chance does wildlife have against those with enormous war chests wining and dining greedy congressmen?  One must also look at how the public was, again, betrayed by congress when the revered wolves of Yellowstone (collared and un-collared, alike) became targets for hunters and trappers who were permitted to lure the wolves over the Yellowstone boundary to be killed. Tax paying citizens of America, tourists from around the world, and the wolves were truly blindsided and betrayed by a government who promised Yellowstone would be a sanctuary for people to enjoy nature and for creatures to live as they were intended. The action of congress to delist wolves in April of 2011 is still believed by many to be unconstitutional---Boston Law School came to this conclusion when a rider was inserted that with the delisting there could be no judicial review! In this country the power of the judiciary is supposed to be equal to the power of the legislation---but somehow, not in the case of the gray wolf. Seems that congress, acting like pseudo-scientists, did not realize (or care) that they were dooming our wolves by over-hunting, creating chaotic, fragmented and dispersing wolf packs, as well as reducing the diversity of the DNA pool. Perhaps congress, with their new job description of deciding the fate of our wildlife for future generations, should first be enrolled in bio-ethic classes.Write to your legislators and suggest they give the wolves back to the real scientists.Linda Camac/Good Wolf

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