Sign the Petition to

State Representative Jeff Pyle

White Nose Syndrome has claimed 5.7 million bats since it's discovery in 2006. Fatalities of nine species have been discovered, six of those species are indigenous to Pennsylvania. Only one of the species found in Pennsylvania is listed as Federally Endangered, the Indiana myotis (Myotis sodalis). Why are the remaining 5 critically declining species not protected under the Endangered Species Act of 1973? 

More than 99% of Pennsylvania's bats have died from White Nose Syndrome. "I'm not sure that it can get much worse than what's already happened in Pennsylvania. The state has had more losses of bats than any other state in the country," said Katie Gillis, a biologist for Bat Conservation International in Austin, Texas. The state Game Commission is soliciting comments about giving endangered status to the tricolored bat, the little brown bat, and the northern long-eared bat.

The abandoned Durham Iron Mine located in upper Bucks County Pennsylvania was once home to 17,000 bats in 1999, years following the historical decline since the appearance of white nose syndrome only 7 bats remain in the Durham Mine. One colony of of as many as 300,000 bats in western Pennsylvania is down to 138 cited naturalist and researcher Scott Weidensual. 

State Representative Jeff Pyle should reconsider the devastating effects our agriculture and local ecosystem if bats disappear altogether. "I like bats. I just like humans better," said State Rep. Jeff Pyle, whose district in Armstrong and Indiana Counties includes mining, farming, and hydraulic fracturing operations. An insectivorous bat can consume 3,000 to 4,000 insects nightly during the warmer months. Bats provide pest-control to agriculture valued from $3.7 billion to $53 billion a year, studies show.

This cause was created to aid in the enforcement toward listing certain rapidly declining bat species as endangered. This protection will offer crevice dwelling bat species which occupy foliage during the maternity season an opportunity to reproduce without devastating habitat loss states USFWS :Indiana bats use trees as roosting and foraging sites during summer months. Loss and fragmentation of forested habitats can affect bat populations." Pennsylvania is the largest producer of hardwoods in the United States. This also illustrates how many natural historical roosting sites are being disturbed and demolished due to  deforestation. 

Pennsylvania bats need your help! These fragile creatures desperately need our help! Night foraging bats consume such agricultural and nightly pests as the malaria carrying mosquito, gypsy moths that destroy crops, and the invasive generalist species of Japanese beetle. Providing protection to the bats as well as their habitat, and maternity roosts ensures that they have a fighting chance to reproduce during this critical time. 


Signed,

Steph Stronsick

This petition closed almost 2 years ago

How this will help

Bats are the primary predator of night flying insects such as the invasive gypsy moth, malaria carrying mosquitos, and beetle species such as the Japanese beetle. They are agricultures number one...

Bats are the primary predator of night flying insects such as the invasive gypsy moth, malaria carrying mosquitos, and beetle species such as the Japanese beetle. They are agricultures number one pest control, saving famers $3.7 billion to $53 billion annually. 

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